The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Individual » Sat Apr 04, 2009 3:24 am

Ana wrote:Enlightenment comes naturally. After many reincarnations. You can't stop being something. You can't stop being yourself. You can't provoke it.

This seems to be the view propounded by the Ajivikas, which the Buddha rejected. The Buddha taught that enlightened comes through gradual, disciplined training. Your remarks above about the Buddha's woman, assuming they're about his wife, they're also wrong. She was well taken care of. He was gone, but everything is impermanent. No one would fault the world if the Buddha was taken away by cancer and yet if he was taken away by a quest to seek enlightenment for the sake of all sentient beings equally, this is a controversy?
The best things in life aren't things.

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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Fede » Sat Apr 04, 2009 10:03 am

Today, now, I am a woman.
I am a Buddhist woman.
I am a free-thinker and independent.
I am what many might call 'liberated'.
But I am not 'Feminist.'

I used to think as you do.

I have moved on somewhat.....

I actually find your view jaded, and objectionable.
It is obvious you have a prejudiced view and are propounding an agenda.
I think you need to shed the obscurations and clouds from your eyes and understand, know and accept that Gender, in Buddhism is entirely irrelevant.
Starting from this viewpoint, then you can build on the real message of Buddhism:

Life is Suffering/Unsatisfactory.
It is thus because we cling, grasp and insist....
We can rise above and leave this clinging, grasping insistence.
The way to do this, is through the Eightfold Path.

Nowhere here, is it even insinuated that there exists the Woman of Buddha Sakyamuni.
But there is emphasis on the clinging, grasping insistence.

Stop insisting.

You'll do fine.

:namaste:
"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

I am sooooo happy - How on earth could I be otherwise?! :D


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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Sat Apr 04, 2009 12:09 pm

This seems to be the view propounded by the Ajivikas, which the Buddha rejected. The Buddha taught that enlightened comes through gradual, disciplined training.


I agree here, it does seem to be an Ajivika thinking


In reguards to the Ajivikas, I read somewhere (cant find the site now) that out of his contemporaries the Buddha opposed the Ajivikas the most, since they denied action and result while others like ajita kesakambali denied result but not action etc
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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