The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.

The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:01 pm

The woman of Buddha must have been the most unhappy human being in the world. She knew an enlightened person who didn't help her at all. It feels like cutting your wrists. What else? Woman must be very bad to be treated this way by an enlightened being. Why existing then? There is no need to exist. Imagine your mother being enlightened and not giving a damn about you and not helping you with enlightenment at all. How would you feel? Your own mother! The God himself! Of course you would want to die. Why do you exist in the first place? Mother, why was I born? Why do I even exist?
You really want to die.

Woman better leave this world so that only mountains peaks exist because nobody really loves valleys or cares about them. Let this world be full of mountain peaks and you plant your crops there in the peaks and take your animals to graze in the peaks also.

:namaste:



I think the monks and priests who came after Buddha hide and twisted many things
because it's obvious that something here doesn't smell right. are you puppets or are you people who meditate?
stop reading books. focus on your meditation.
oh yes, I won't be surprised if you delete this topic. but then don't complain your mother despizes you. you are just despizing your mother
Last edited by Ana on Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:03 pm

Greetings


Im not sure i understand your post, are you saying the Buddha (and us?) are in some way sexist towards women? Yasodharā (the Buddhas wife) joined the Sangha and became a Arahant





Metta


:anjali:
Last edited by clw_uk on Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:07 pm

clw_uk wrote:Greetings


Im not sure i understand your post, are you saying the Buddha (and us?) are in some way sexist towards women? Perhaps if you could expand your point a bit further?


Metta


:anjali:



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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:12 pm

Enlightenment comes naturally. After many reincarnations. You can't stop being something. You can't stop being yourself. You can't provoke it.
So in the meantime while you are still a man and a woman and not Buddha, be true, be genunine, be authentic. Nothing doesn't exist, that's why you try and you try and you can't be nothing because simply it doesn't exist; be whole.
If you are nothing you will suffer. Suffer is there, it won't stop. If you refuse suffering it will come in double. Accept life as the gift of God that it is. God made man and woman, live as a man and woman until naturally you drop all desires, all ego, all necessity to be with someone. Naturally,

The secret is not to be nothing, the secret is to be everything. Only when you are everything buddha nature can come to you. Buddha nature doesn't want repressed people. Buddha Nature comes from the excess of everything, not from the renunciation of everything.
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:17 pm

Greetings Ana


Taken from your site

All success and all misery is a product of the mind. Next life you will be a woman and woman will be men. The body is temporary and so is sex. And then the sex of your body doesn't speak for you, it doesn't says who you really are. We are all men, everybody is a man but Buddha. Buddha is the only woman. She who is like the Sun. She who warms like fire..



I would like to challenge this if i may, Buddha is neither man or woman, to say Buddha is a man is clinging to form and gender and claiming them as "self", to say Buddha is woman is the same, clinging to form and gender and saying this is "self"

You do seem to have this point but then i dont understand why you continue with the reasoning

"We are all men, everybody is a man but Buddha. Buddha is the only woman. She who is like the Sun. She who warms like fire."

A Buddha doesnt have a sex or gender, only the physical body does which is Anatta or not-self, not "I", not something that can be identified as Buddha

So Buddha's arent male or female

Metta
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:19 pm

clw_uk wrote:Greetings Ana


Taken from your site

And then the sex of your body doesn't speak for you, it doesn't says who you really are. We are all men, everybody is a man but Buddha. Buddha is the only woman. She who is like the Sun. She who warms like fire.



I would like to challenge this if i may, Buddha is neither man or woman, to say Buddha is a man is clinging to form and gender and claiming them as "self", to say Buddha is woman is the same, clinging to form and gender and saying this is "self"

A Buddha doesnt have a sex or gender, only the physical body does which is Anatta or not-self, not "I", not something that can be identified as Buddha

So Buddha's arent male or female

Metta


I understand. But I speak for common man, not for scholars.
We must rescue the common man because the scholars already know all that

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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:26 pm

Greetings

Ana wrote:Enlightenment comes naturally. After many reincarnations. You can't stop being something. You can't stop being yourself. You can't provoke it.
So in the meantime while you are still a man and a woman and not Buddha, be true, be genunine, be authentic. Nothing doesn't exist, that's why you try and you try and you can't be nothing because simply it doesn't exist; be whole.
If you are nothing you will suffer. Suffer is there, it won't stop. If you refuse suffering it will come in double. Accept life as the gift of God that it is. God made man and woman, live as a man and woman until naturally you drop all desires, all ego, all necessity to be with someone. Naturally,

The secret is not to be nothing, the secret is to be everything. Only when you are everything buddha nature can come to you. Buddha nature doesn't want repressed people. Buddha Nature comes from the excess of everything, not from the renunciation of everything.



After many reincarnations


In Buddhism there is no reincarnation


You can't stop being something. You can't stop being yourself


Yes you can, nibbana is the end of all "I" making, all sense of self. In reality there is no permanent self, nothing that can be claimed as "me"


So in the meantime while you are still a man and a woman and not Buddha,


I am not anything, this physical form of "mine" has the gender of male, with the conditioned tendencies of a male mind, but its not self, not "me" since all conditoned things are not-self

No one "becomes" a Buddha, but if you saying i am not enlightened then i agree, that hasnt occured yet


If you are nothing you will suffer. Suffer is there, it won't stop. If you refuse suffering it will come in double


This is wrong understanding friend, if you become something you will suffer, when there is no more becoming, no more identification or sense of self, there is no more suffering. Suffering can be stopped by the Noble eight fold path



Accept life as the gift of God that it is. God made man and woman, live as a man and woman until naturally you drop all desires, all ego, all necessity to be with someone


If this is your belief about God i respect that, but to my understanding this isnt so

In reguards to being with someone, as Lord Buddha said

"why should i, subject to birth, ageing, sickness and death, also seek that which is subject to birth, ageing, sickness and death?"



Buddha nature doesn't want repressed people. Buddha Nature comes from the excess of everything, not from the renunciation of everything.


As a follower of Theravada i dont know much about Buddha Nature but in my understanding, excess of everything is desire. Desire is the source of all dukkha

Renunciation is the way to the deathless, to peace

The Buddha taught the middle way, not endulging in pleasure nor extreme denial

Metta
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:40 pm

Greetings


I understand. But I speak for common man, not for scholars.
We must rescue the common man because the scholars already know all that


Im not a scholar :)

One doesnt have to be one to understand Dhamma


Metta
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby SeerObserver » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:56 pm

I'm sure you and many women, in accordance with comtemporary societal roles, prefer a man who to stay with you and raise children and live the traditional family life.

Of course this only serves to repeat the samsara of birth, ageing, sickness, and death. So knowing what you know, I would expect that you would rejoice in the Princess' merit that her Prince went to find the way out of the cycle and came back to teach it. How exactly is this not helping her at all?
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:05 pm

Give it all to me. You have no ego, no I, you renounce to everything.
So give it all to me, your politics, your religion, your institutions, your commerce, your industries.
You don't want it. You don't want to suffer, you don't want to rule, you are nothing.
That is the true meaning of renounciation and no "I" - you give it all to me.
What else do you want? I am giving you the chance to be an enlightened being by being the Princess who keeps all that you don't want and all that makes you suffer. You will not have the "I" to judge me because you also renounced to judgement.
Give it to your Princess, to the mother of your child. Who else should you give it to?
Give it to your mother, to the mother of you. Who else should you give it to?
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby cooran » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:22 pm

Hello Ana,

The Title of this Thread - "The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni" is incorrect. Prior to his enlightenment, the layman Siddatha Gotama was a married man. Once becoming The Buddha, he never had an intimate relationship with any woman.

Here is a little factual information about Siddattha Gotama before he made The Renunciation of family and worldly life for the sake of all sentient beings, and uncovered the long forgotten Path to Liberation, making it available to the world once again:

"Critics have condemned Siddhartha for His manner of leaving home and Kingdom. Some described it as a 'callous abandonment of wife and family'. Yet what would have happened if He had not left so stealthily and had approached His loved ones for a formal farewell? They would, of course, have implored him to change His mind. The scene would have been hysterical, and quite possibly the little domain of His father Rajah Suddhodana would have been thrown into turmoil. His intention to seek the truth would have had to be aborted by His father and wife who would prevent Him from His renunciation plans. At the age of 29 years, Siddhartha was a full-blooded young man in the prime of life. As it was, the temptation not to abandon all He had know and loved in order to seek the truth must have been formidable. During His final moments in the palace, He visited His bedroom and looked at His slumbering wife and their newborn child. The great impulse to remain and abandon His plan must have caused Him agony. Certainly in those days in India, it was considered a noble thing for a man to forsake home and loved ones to become an ascetic to lead a holy life. All things considered, it would seem that Siddhartha was right in boldly and quickly achieving His plan.
He renounced the world not for His own sake or convenience but for the sake of suffering humanity. To Him the whole of mankind is one family. The renunciation of Prince Siddhartha at that early age was the boldest step that a man could have taken.
Detachment is one of the most important factors for the attainment of Enlightenment. The attainment of Enlightenment is by way of non-attachment. Most of life's troubles are caused by attachment. We get angry, we worry, we become greedy and complain bitterly. All these causes of unhappiness, tension, stubbornness and sadness are due to attachment. When we investigate any trouble or worry we have, the main cause is always attachment. Had Prince Siddhartha developed His attachment towards His wife, Child, kingdom and worldly pleasures, He would never have been able to discover the remedy for suffering mankind. Therefore, He had to sacrifice everything including worldly pleasures in order to have a concentrated mind free from distractions, in order to find the Truth that can cure humanity from suffering.
In the eyes of this young Prince, the whole world was burning with lust, anger, greed and man other defilements which ignite the fire of passions. He saw each and every living being in this including His wife and child, suffering from all sorts of physical and mental ailments. So determined was He to seek a solution for the eradication of suffering amongst suffering humanity, that He was prepared to sacrifice everything.
Two thousand five hundred years after His renunciation, some people shed crocodile tears or criticize Him for His action. His wife, however, did not accuse Him for desertion when she realized the purpose of His renunciation. Instead, she gave up her luxurious life to lead a simple life as a mark of respect.
Here is how a well-known poet saw the renunciation of the Buddha:
'Twas not through hatred of children sweet,
'Twas not through hatred of His lovely wife,
Thriller of hearts-not that He loved them less,
But Buddhahood more, that He renounced them all.
(Dwight Goddard)
http://evans-experientialism.freewebspa ... ists01.htm

The Buddha and Yasodhara
Princess Yasodhara, also known as Rahulamata, Bimba and Bhaddakaccana, was the daughter of King Suppabuddha, who reigned over the Koliya race, and Pamita, sister of King Suddhodana [ the Buddha's father ]. She was of the same age as Prince Siddhattha, whom she married at the age of sixteen.
Yasodhara also entered the Order and attained Arahantship.

The Buddha and Rahula
Rahula was the only son of Prince Siddhattha and Princess Yasodhara. He was born on the day when Prince Siddhattha decided to renounce the world. The happy news of the birth of his infant son was conveyed to him when he was in the park in a contemplative mood. Contrary to ordinary expectations, instead of rejoicing over the news, he exclaimed ' Rahu jato, bandhanam jatam -- A Rahu is born, a fetter has arisen! ' Accordingly the child was named Rahula by King Suddhodana, his grandfather.
Rahula was admitted into the Noble Order at the age of seven .
From "The Buddha and His Relatives" By Venerable Narada Mahathera
http://www.budsas.org/ebud/budtch/budteach08.htm

Here is some information about Siddatha Gotama's wife, with links to stories about their contact in previous lives:
Rāhulamātā The name, generally given in the texts, of Rāhula's mother (E.g., Vin.i.82) and Gotama's wife.
She is also called Bhaddakaccā,* and, in later texts, Yasodharā (BuA., p.245; Dvy.253), Bimbādevī (J.ii.392f.; DA.ii.422) and, probably, Bimbāsundarī (J.vi.478 [12]).
* E.g., Bu.xxvi.15; Mhv.ii.24 calls her Bhaddakaccānā; but see Thomas, op. cit., 49; she is also called Subhaddakā, this being probably a variant of Bhaddakaccānā.
The Northern texts seem to favour the name of Yasodharā, but they call her the daughter of Dandapānī. (See also Rockhill, op. cit., where various other names are given as well). It is probable that the name of Gotama's wife was Bimbā, and that Bhaddakaccā, Subhaddakā, Yosadhāri and the others, were descriptive epithets applied to her, which later became regarded as, additional names. It is also possible that in Gotama's court there was also a Yasodharā, daughter of Dandapānī, and that there was a later confusion of names. The Commentarial explanation (E.g., AA.i.204), that she was called Bhaddakaccānā because her body was the colour of burnished gold, is probably correct. To suggest (E.g., Thomas, op. cit., 49) that the name bears any reference to the Kaccānagotta seems to be wrong, because the Kaccāna was a brahmin gotta and the Sākiyans were not brahmins.
Rāhulamātā was born on the same day as the Bodhisatta (J.i.54; BuA. 106, 228). She married him (Gotama) at the age of sixteen (the following account is taken chiefly from J.i.58ff), and was placed at the head of forty thousand women, given to Gotama by the Sākiyans, after he had proved his manly prowess to their satisfaction. Gotama left the household life on the day of the birth of his son Rāhula (according to one account, referred to in the Jātaka Commentary, i.62, Rāhula was seven days old). It is said that just before he left home he took a last look at his wife from the door of her room, not daring to go nearer, lest he should awake her.

When the Buddha paid his first visit to Kapilavatthu after the Enlightenment, and on the second day of that visit, he begged in the street for alms. This news spread, and Rāhulamātā looked out of her window to see if it were true. She saw the Buddha, and was so struck by the glory of his personality that she uttered eight verses in its praise. These verses have been handed down under the name of Narasīhagāthā; on that day, after the Buddha had finished his meal in the palace, which he took at the invitation of Suddhodana, all the ladies of the court, with the exception of Rāhulamātā, went to pay him obeisance. She refused to go, saying that if she had any virtue in her the Buddha would come to her. The Buddha went to her with his two chief Disciples and gave orders that she should be allowed to greet him as she wished. She fell at his feet, and clasping them with her hands, put her head on them. Suddhodana related to the Buddha how, from the time he had left home, Rāhulamātā had herself abandoned all luxury and had lived in the same manner as she had heard that the Buddha lived - wearing yellow robes, eating only once a day, etc. And the Buddha then related the Candakinnara Jātaka, to show how, in the past, too, her loyalty had been supreme.
On the seventh day of the Buddha's visit, when he left the palace at the end of his meal, Rāhulamātā sent Rāhula to him saying, "That is your father, go and ask him for your inheritance." Rāhula followed the Buddha, and, at the Buddha's request, was ordained by Sāriputta. The account of this event is given in Vin.i.82; this is probably the only passage in the Pitakas where Rāhulamātā, is mentioned by name.

Later, when the Buddha allowed women to join the Order, Rāhulamātā became a nun under Mahā Pajāpatī Gotamī (AA.i.198).

Buddhaghosa identifies (AA.i.204f) Rāhulamātā with Bhaddakaccānā who, in the Anguttara Nikāya (A.i.25), is mentioned as chief among nuns in the possession of supernormal powers (mahābhiññappattānam). She was one of the four disciples of the Buddha who possessed such attainment, the others being Sāriputta, Moggallāna and Bakkula. She expressed her desire for this achievement in the time of Padumuttara Buddha.
In this account Bhaddakaccānā is mentioned as the daughter of the Sākyan Suppabuddha and his wife Amitā.* She joined the Order under Pajāpatī Gotamī in the company of Janapadakalyānī (Nandā), and in the Order she was known as Bhaddakaccānā Therī. Later, she developed insight and became an arahant. She could, with one effort, recall one asankheyya and one hundred thousand kappas (AA.i.205).
* Cf. Mhv.ii.21f. It is said (DhA.iii.44f) that Suppabuddha did not forgive the Buddha for leaving his daughter; Devadatta was Bhaddakaccanā's daughter, and it has been suggested that Devadatta's enmity against the Buddha was for reasons similar to her father's.
In the Therī Apadāna (Ap.ii.584ff ) an account is found of a Therī, Yasodharā by name, who is evidently to be identified with Rāhulamātā, because she speaks of herself (vvs. 10, 11) as the Buddha's pajāpatī before he left the household (agāra), and says that she was the chief (pāmokkhā sabbaissarā) of ninety thousand women.

In the time of Dīpankara Buddha, when the Bodhisatta was born as Sumedha, she was a brahmin maiden, Sumittā by name, and gave eight handfuls of lotuses to Sumedha, which he, in turn, offered to the Buddha. Dīpankara, in declaring that Sumedha would ultimately become the Buddha, added that Sumittā would be his companion in several lives. The Apadāna account (vvs. 1ff ) mentions how, just before her death, at the age of seventy eight, she took leave of the Buddha and performed various miracles. It also states (Ap.ii.592f ) that eighteen thousand arahants nuns, companions of Yasodharā, also died on the same day.
The Abbhantara Jātaka* mentions that Bimbādevī (who is called the chief wife of Gotama and is therefore evidently identical with Rāhulamātā) was once, after becoming a nun, ill from flatulence. When Rāhula, as was his custom, came to visit her, he was told that he could not see her, but that, when she had suffered from the same trouble at home, she had been cured by mango juice with sugar. Rāhula reported the matter to his preceptor, Sāriputta, who obtained the mango juice from Pasenadi. When Pasenadi discovered why the mango juice had been needed, he arranged that from that day it should be regularly supplied. The Jātaka relates how, in a past birth too, Sāriputta had come to Rāhulamātā's rescue.
* J.ii.392f.; cf. the Supatta Jātaka, where Sāriputta, at Rāhula's request, obtained for her from Pasenadi rice with ghee, flavoured with red fish. This was for abdominal pain (J.ii.433).
Numerous stories are found in the Jātaka Commentary in which Rāhulamātā is identified with one or other of the characters - e.g.,
the queen consort in the Abbhantara,
Sammillabhāsinī in the Ananusociya,
Samuddavijayā in the āditta,
Udayabhaddā in the Udaya,
the potter's wife (? Bhaggavī) in the Kumbhakāra,
the queen in the Kummāsa,
the queen consort in the Kurudhamma,
Pabhāvatī in the Kusa,
Candā, in the Khandahāla,
the queen in the Gangamāla,
the female in the two Cakkavāka Jātakas,
Candā in the Candakinnara,
Sumanā in the Campeyya,
the woman ascetic in the Cullabodhi,
Candā in the Culla Sutasoma,
the queen in the Jayaddisa,
Sītā in the Dasaratha,
the queen in the Pānīya,
the wife in the Bandhanāgāra,
Sujātā in the Manicora,
Manoja's mother in the Manoja,
Sīvalī in the Mahājanaka,
Subhaddā in the Mahāsudassana,
the mother deer in the Lakkhana,
Visayha's wife in the Visayha,
Maddī in the Vessantara,
Suphassā in the Supatta,
the queen in the Susīma,
and the smith's wife in the Sūci.
http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_n ... lamata.htm

metta
Chris
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:39 pm

:rules:
Last edited by Ana on Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:42 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:39 pm

Greetings Ana,

Ana wrote:are you puppets or are you people who meditate?


Ana wrote:oh yes, I won't be surprised if you delete this topic. but then don't complain your mother despizes you. you are just despizing your mother


If you wish to discuss something, please do so without attacking other participants. It is entirely unneccessary and irrelevant to the point that you seem to be trying to make.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:41 pm

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings Ana,
If you wish to discuss something, please do so without attacking other participants. It is entirely unneccessary and irrelevant to the point that you seem to be trying to make.

Metta,
Retro. :)


Is that your son?
You have that picture for a long time now
It's a beautiful picture.


SeerObserver wrote: So knowing what you know, I would expect that you would rejoice in the Princess' merit that her Prince went to find the way out of the cycle and came back to teach it. How exactly is this not helping her at all?


then it's the Princess who has no ego, no "I", because she is happy that you are enlightened, she is not wanting the enlightenment for herself. she is rejoicing that you found the way out of the cycle, not her. She is the one who renounced to everything, even enlightenment, even finding, because the Prince went searching and if you search it's because you want something. the Princess is happy that you get it. How has she not helped you at all?


ps: Hi Chris, o please it's such a big text. I prefer your words, your heart. That is important for me, your heart. the rest matter little. buddha renounced to the mind but he did not renounce to the heart
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:45 pm

Ana wrote:Give it all to me. You have no ego, no I, you renounce to everything.
So give it all to me, your politics, your religion, your institutions, your commerce, your industries.
You don't want it. You don't want to suffer, you don't want to rule, you are nothing.
That is the true meaning of renounciation and no "I" - you give it all to me.
What else do you want? I am giving you the chance to be an enlightened being by being the Princess who keeps all that you don't want and all that makes you suffer. You will not have the "I" to judge me because you also renounced to judgement.
Give it to your Princess, to the mother of your child. Who else should you give it to?
Give it to your mother, to the mother of you. Who else should you give it to?



When people renounce the wordly life to focus on enlightenment, they dont give the worldly life they had to others

Im not sure what you mean by

Give it to your Princess, to the mother of your child. Who else should you give it to?
Give it to your mother, to the mother of you. Who else should you give it to


What is there to give? unless you mean the gift of Dhamma which many people have given to both their family and friends and strangers


You will not have the "I" to judge me because you also renounced to judgement.


I dont think anyone is judging you :)

Metta
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:48 pm

clw_uk wrote:
Ana wrote:Give it all to me. You have no ego, no I, you renounce to everything.
So give it all to me, your politics, your religion, your institutions, your commerce, your industries.
You don't want it. You don't want to suffer, you don't want to rule, you are nothing.
That is the true meaning of renounciation and no "I" - you give it all to me.
What else do you want? I am giving you the chance to be an enlightened being by being the Princess who keeps all that you don't want and all that makes you suffer. You will not have the "I" to judge me because you also renounced to judgement.
Give it to your Princess, to the mother of your child. Who else should you give it to?
Give it to your mother, to the mother of you. Who else should you give it to?


When people renounce the wordly life to focus on enlightenment, they dont give the worldly life they had to others

Give it to your Princess, to the mother of your child. Who else should you give it to?
Give it to your mother, to the mother of you. Who else should you give it to


What is there to give?


the legacy of course
the institutions, the kingdom, the religion, buddhism

:reading:
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:48 pm

Greetings


then it's the Princess who has no ego, no "I", because she is happy that you are enlightened, she is not wanting the enlightenment for herself. she is rejoicing that you found the way out of the cycle, not her. She is the one who renounced to everything, even enlightenment, even finding, because the Prince went searching and if you search it's because you want something. the Princess is happy that you get it. How has she not helped you at all?


Who is this princess your refering to? If you mean Yasodharā, "she" died many centuries ago
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby clw_uk » Fri Apr 03, 2009 9:50 pm

Greetings

the legacy of course
the institutions, the kingdom, the religion, buddhism



These things arent forced on others, they are left behind for those who wish to follow the path to awakening (with the exception of "kingdom", Buddhadhamma isnt about kingdoms or goverment in my understanding)


Metta
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ana » Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:05 pm

clw_uk wrote:Greetings

the legacy of course
the institutions, the kingdom, the religion, buddhism


These things arent forced on others, they are left behind for those who wish to follow the path to awakening (with the exception of "kingdom", Buddhadhamma isnt about kingdoms or goverment in my understanding)


Metta



I got to go and meditate now :meditate:
I hope you feel happy I came here to chat a bit :pig:







:rofl: bye everybody
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Re: The woman of Buddha Sakyamuni

Postby Ngawang Drolma. » Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:51 am

Striking resemblance here! The photo on the left is an actress named Isabella Rossellini.

Image Image
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