Tea?

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.

Tea?

Postby K.Dhamma » Wed May 01, 2013 12:46 am

With or without milk?

I prefer milk and honey. But only with certain brands and I usually get the Irish Morning blend. How about you guys?
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Re: Tea?

Postby Modus.Ponens » Wed May 01, 2013 1:18 am

It depends on the tea, but in most cases, no. There is only one specific tea that my sister in law makes that takes milk and it makes a good combination.

By the way, earl grey is my favorite.
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Re: Tea?

Postby m0rl0ck » Wed May 01, 2013 1:57 am

Punjana irish breakfast has been my mainstay of late, tho i do like Red Rose earl grey. I usually take it straight, i have a tendancy to let it become a chemistry experiment if i start adding stuff.
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Re: Tea?

Postby Mojo » Wed May 01, 2013 5:18 am

I've really become fond of adding milk and splenda to my tea - even iced!
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Tea?

Postby GraemeR » Wed May 01, 2013 6:30 am

K.Dhamma wrote:With or without milk?

I prefer milk and honey. But only with certain brands and I usually get the Irish Morning blend. How about you guys?


I have green tea which is best plain

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Re: Tea?

Postby Sam Vara » Wed May 01, 2013 9:49 am

Why thank you! Soya milk but no sugar, please. Just leave it next to the keyboard until I've finished typing. I'm on Dhamma Wheel at the moment.

Are there any biscuits? Gingers would be nice...
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Re: Tea?

Postby Coyote » Wed May 01, 2013 10:04 am

I like strong breakfast tea with just milk. :coffee:
Sugar in tea is revolting IMO.

Though I have started to cut down on caffeinated drinks because of their effect on the body.

I also like green and white tea, darjeeling, lapsang souchong, you name it.
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Re: Tea?

Postby James the Giant » Wed May 01, 2013 11:16 am

Tea! This is how I like it!
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Re: Tea?

Postby Kim OHara » Wed May 01, 2013 12:34 pm

:twothumbsup:

:focus:
My parents' idea of tea was very strong with milk and sugar ... I didn't like it much but didn't know any better. When I left home I discovered herbal teas - peppermint, lemongrass and more - and green tea.
No milk and sugar! Good!
So then I tried "normal" tea made the same way - not too strong, unadulterated ... it was actually not bad that way :smile:

But by then I was a confirmed coffee drinker anyway. :shrug:

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Re: Tea?

Postby zavk » Wed May 01, 2013 11:03 pm

Have had to avoid coffee because the high levels of caffeine are not good for an ongoing skin condition. I don't miss the caffeine hit so much as the aroma. :(

So I'm rediscovering the rich tradition of Chinese tea which I've not paid much attention to, even though I have been exposed to it as part of my ancestral heritage. Though, it is not uncommon for the diverse 'Chinese' diaspora around the world to be uneducated or unconcerned about such things, nor should they be expected to.

龙井茶 long jing tea, or literally dragon's well tea http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longjing_tea
Have not yet tasted the expensive ones.

茉莉花茶 jasmine tea. Very common but I've been fascinated at the many sub-varieties, some of which are extremely delicate and aromatic, like when they are rolled up into 'pearls' - sometimes marketed as 'Buddha's tears'. Apparently the jasmine flower was introduced to China together with Buddhism.

乌龙茶 Oolong tea, literally black dragon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oolong
Another common tea, but never knew about the intricate craft behind its many sub-varieties. I really enjoy the Tie Guanyin (Iron Guanyin) when it is served in the traditional Gongfu tea ceremony. Not as elaborate as the Japanese chado, but something very mindful about the whole process: rinsing the teaware, appreciating only the aroma of the first brew before discarding it, then allowing the different scents of each subsequent brews to unfold...

Right now, I'm sipping on breakfast black tea cultivated in Sri Lanka, which is really an offshoot of red tea introduced by the British in the 1800s from China.
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Re: Tea?

Postby zavk » Wed May 01, 2013 11:31 pm

Oh and I've only had it at eateries and homes of friends, have not visited those countries yet. But the chai (not the instant premix) of South Asian cultures like India and Pakistan - strong, very milky, spiced, and often sweet - they are in a class of their own. :clap:
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Re: Tea?

Postby cooran » Wed May 01, 2013 11:44 pm

Queen of all Teas, I have been trying to find a ''real Masala Chai'' since my last trip to India - no luck so far:

Masala Chai
http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/11/c ... -chai.html

craving, craving, craving :cry:

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Re: Tea?

Postby Kim OHara » Thu May 02, 2013 12:03 am

cooran wrote:Queen of all Teas, I have been trying to find a ''real Masala Chai'' since my last trip to India - no luck so far:

Masala Chai
http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/11/c ... -chai.html

craving, craving, craving :cry:

with metta
Chris

Thanks, Chris - great link! I particularly liked "Some people really empty out the whole spice rack here," and later, "freshly ground spices, which will release a great deal more depth and aroma into your chai than will something you've held onto in a tin for the course of several apartment moves." :D

But it suggests the possibility that the normal English tea I grew up with was a degenerate (simplified) masala chai in the first place. :thinking: Weird!

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Re: Tea?

Postby zavk » Thu May 02, 2013 12:08 am

cooran wrote:Queen of all Teas, I have been trying to find a ''real Masala Chai'' since my last trip to India - no luck so far:

Masala Chai
http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/11/c ... -chai.html

craving, craving, craving :cry:

with metta
Chris


Hi Chris

It's quite extraordinary isn't it? I'm looking forward to the day when I get it off the street hawker in India. Apparently, there is no one recipe, it all comes down to the preferred mix. I've tried approximating it, based on what I've observed in real life and on TV. I find that tea dust gives it the necessary oomph. I get it from the Indian grocer/dry goods store. Then the mix of spices is really up to you, but what I do is grind them roughly in a mortar and pestle - doing spices in this manner seems to bring out the aroma more; cracking the cardamon pods really brings out the flavour. Apparently traditionalist would insist that it is made ONLY with milk. What I do is use equal parts milk and water, and quite a bit of tea dust (the tea needs to be thick and strong; I'd suggest you use a lot more than what is typically consumed). So I first cook the tea on the stove in a small amount of water, then, add the spices, bring it to a low boil, then add milk. Then I let it simmer fo a bit. I think the milk ought to be cooked down slightly, thickened. Then I add honey to taste.
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Re: Tea?

Postby cooran » Thu May 02, 2013 12:12 am

Ohhh YUM!!!!!!!!!

When I had it in India - the restaurant would only make it if there were four to six people wanting it -and then, it took over half and hour to boil all the ingredients together and get the right texture and concentration.
I would go back to India just for a 'proper cup of Masala Chai Tea' - maybe I'm a ''one hit and you're an addict'' person??

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Re: Tea?

Postby zavk » Thu May 02, 2013 12:38 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:But it suggests the possibility that the normal English tea I grew up with was a degenerate (simplified) masala chai in the first place. :thinking: Weird!

Kim


The history of tea cultivation and how it came to be adopted as an English habit is an interesting read. Roughly speaking, tea had to be promoted as a viable return cargo for the East India Company. The mass cultivation of tea in India and Ceylon occurred in the 1800s and was a means to break China's monopoly on tea trade, to force it to enter into a different trade relation - and it is worth noting that getting its people hooked on opium (cultivated and imported from South and Central Asia) was a part of this process.

So in a manner of speaking, the drinking of tea migrated from China to South Asia to England. Compared with the long history of tea culture in China, Japan, and Korea, and the ways in which South Asians make their tea rich and strong, some might say that the English approach of having tea with a spot of milk (and biscuits) is an 'adulterated' and 'degenerate' form of tea drinking. I think that is an unhelpful, decontextualised, hubristic and inhospitable way of thinking; a way to shore up cultural capital for oneself, to establish cultural hierarchies, rather than to appreciate tea.

A parallel could be drawn with the recurring discussions we witness here about 'authentic' or 'original' vs. 'adulterated' or 'degenerate' approaches to the Buddha's teachings, I reckon.... Yet, I don't think we are going to see heated debates about who has gotten it 'wrong' about tea - and hence, in need to be told off or convinced of the 'errors' of their ways or to lose their unnecessary 'cultural baggage' - any time soon, are we?

EDIT: Am reminded of this? :tongue: :reading:

Image
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Re: Tea?

Postby Kim OHara » Thu May 02, 2013 6:08 am

zavk wrote:Image

Another Asterix fan! Great!

And I will come back to the rest of your post when I have a little more time.

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Re: Tea?

Postby Modus.Ponens » Thu May 02, 2013 10:47 am

Sorry for the off topic, but I think that's the story where they meet the britons. One thing that's lost in translation is a joke made by the author about the english grammar. In France, and other latin language speaking countries, the adjectives come after the substantive. The joke the author makes is to write what britons are saying (in french) with the order of the adjectives reversed. It makes a confusing but interesting read.
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Re: Tea?

Postby Feathers » Thu May 02, 2013 11:11 am

English breakfast tea, strong, with milk.

I love Arabian/Persian tea, enjoy green tea with jasmine, and drink lemon&ginger tea when my stomach feels dodgey. I also like Earl Grey. And in Japan in autumn a few years ago I discovered they sell hot sweet milky tea in plastic bottles in corner shops - absolutely loved it!
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Re: Tea?

Postby Kim OHara » Thu May 02, 2013 11:14 am

Modus.Ponens wrote:Sorry for the off topic, but I think that's the story where they meet the britons. One thing that's lost in translation is a joke made by the author about the english grammar. In France, and other latin language speaking countries, the adjectives come after the substantive. The joke the author makes is to write what britons are saying (in french) with the order of the adjectives reversed. It makes a confusing but interesting read.

A lot of language- or culture-specific jokes are actually translated into the English versions, although of course it's impossible to know how many fail to get through without (a) being as fluent in French as in in English, which I'm not, and (b) comparing the editions page by page.
Then again, good writers can and do load up their books with little jokes that pass right over the heads of readers lacking specific bits of cultural awareness. For instance, "I'm on a mission from Glod," in Pratchett's Soul Music didn't mean anything to me until I saw Blues Brothers. And the title of the tale called "Hob's Leviathan" in Gaiman's Sandman is a pretty esoteric pun.
Anyway, let me go on record here: I really like Asterix. And I really, really like Discworld and anything by Neil Gaiman, and recommend them unreservedly.
Now ... :focus:

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