The questions of Dr Dukkha

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.

Re: Is it worth being friends with this girl?

Postby ihrjordan » Wed Jul 16, 2014 5:19 pm

TheNoBSBuddhist wrote:The more you continue seeing her the more you nurture hope in your heart that something will come of it.

Cut off all contact and do not see her again, or speak with her or have anything to do with her.

I am sending you a PM with a link to a very supportive website. Post your thread there and you will receive the above advice, I guarantee it.

I will also criticise your continued sleeping with her, even though you were out of a relationship.
That's casual sex, or indulging in a FWB situation.

Sex for the sake of it.

Something, in your other thread, you seem to wish to shy away from....

It's a bit self-contradictory, if you don't mind me saying....

I agree, all it leads to (especially with regard to a woman you used to have very strong feelings for) is unneeded frustration and sadness because sooner or later you will wish things were how they used to be when "you and her were happy together" to repeat what NoBSBuddhist said : drop all contact with her, and move on...save yourself the heart ache man..
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Re: If I meditate without a timer, when do I know to stop?

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Wed Jul 16, 2014 5:35 pm

The purpose of not using a timer is to forget about how long you have been sitting and just focus on the meditation objects. If you're wondering about whether to stop or not, note that too. Don't worry, you won't ever sit too long.

With regular practice, one knows almost to the minute when the usual period of sitting is up.
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How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby Dr. Dukkha » Wed Jul 16, 2014 6:39 pm

If it's been going on forever, why haven't we all been enlightened by now?
"There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting."
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Re: Is it worth being friends with this girl?

Postby Dr. Dukkha » Wed Jul 16, 2014 6:58 pm

TheNoBSBuddhist wrote:The more you continue seeing her the more you nurture hope in your heart that something will come of it.

Cut off all contact and do not see her again, or speak with her or have anything to do with her.

I am sending you a PM with a link to a very supportive website. Post your thread there and you will receive the above advice, I guarantee it.

I will also criticise your continued sleeping with her, even though you were out of a relationship.
That's casual sex, or indulging in a FWB situation.

Sex for the sake of it.

Something, in your other thread, you seem to wish to shy away from....

It's a bit self-contradictory, if you don't mind me saying....


I understand how you've gotten that idea. I was still deeply in love with her, I just thought it would be more beneficial if she saw other people. Having sex with them and me was a bit much. We had sex mainly because I wanted to develop the passion to prove myself wrong about the situation. To say that with all that was going on in our relationship, I would take it on even though it would ruin my life. It didn't turn out that way because I realized I should be more worried about the kids having a decent father, although I'd probably be just as good a father as the guy she's with now. It's all a lot of ruckus. But she obviously didn't have my best interest in mind, but it's only kamma, because I wasn't that much of a saint to her either. I treated her well, but I was blatantly honest and upfront, which she really didn't like.
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Can you identify as Buddhist and still reach Nirvana?

Postby Dr. Dukkha » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:08 pm

In esoteric Hinduism, non-self is considered to include any identity. In their method, if I identified myself as a Buddhist, I couldn't reach enlightenment. I'd have to not identify myself, be nothing, to reach enlightenment. Does Buddhism teach this?

If so, could I not reach enlightenment with a sense of Jewish identity?
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby daverupa » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:09 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:If it's been going on forever, why haven't we all been enlightened by now?


Lack of knowing the cause, lack of knowing the cure.

More generally, lack of knowing the possibility.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby Dr. Dukkha » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:10 pm

daverupa wrote:Lack of knowing the cause, lack of knowing the cure.

More generally, lack of knowing the possibility.


"Forever."
"There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting."
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby culaavuso » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:11 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:If it's been going on forever, why haven't we all been enlightened by now?


AN 10.95: Uttiya Sutta wrote:Uttiya, suppose that there were a royal frontier fortress with strong ramparts, strong walls & arches, and a single gate. In it would be a wise, competent, & knowledgeable gatekeeper to keep out those he didn't know and to let in those he did. Patrolling the path around the city, he wouldn't see a crack or an opening in the walls big enough for even a cat to slip through. Although he wouldn't know that 'So-and-so many creatures enter or leave the city,' he would know this: 'Whatever large creatures enter or leave the city all enter or leave it through this gate.'

In the same way, the Tathagata isn't concerned with whether all the cosmos or half of it or a third of it will be led to release by means of that [Dhamma]. But he does know this: 'All those who have been led, are being led, or will be led [to release] from the cosmos have done so, are doing so, or will do so after having abandoned the five hindrances — those defilements of awareness that weaken discernment — having well-established their minds in the four frames of reference, and having developed, as they have come to be, the seven factors for Awakening.


MN 2: Sabbāsava Sutta wrote:This is how he attends inappropriately: 'Was I in the past? Was I not in the past? What was I in the past? How was I in the past? Having been what, what was I in the past? Shall I be in the future? Shall I not be in the future? What shall I be in the future? How shall I be in the future? Having been what, what shall I be in the future?' Or else he is inwardly perplexed about the immediate present: 'Am I? Am I not? What am I? How am I? Where has this being come from? Where is it bound?'
...
He attends appropriately, This is stress... This is the origination of stress... This is the cessation of stress... This is the way leading to the cessation of stress.
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:14 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:
daverupa wrote:Lack of knowing the cause, lack of knowing the cure.

More generally, lack of knowing the possibility.


"Forever."
"Forever" what?

Also, would you mind changing your avatar. This image and the filmed version of it were things I lived through in the 60's when it happened. It was disturbing then, and it remains so. The monk in the photo should not have his photograph used in such a casual manner.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Can you identify as Buddhist and still reach Nirvana?

Postby culaavuso » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:17 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:Does Buddhism teach this?


MN 44: Cūḷavedalla Sutta wrote:"But, lady, how does self-identification come about?"

"There is the case, friend Visakha, where an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — assumes form (the body) to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in form.

"He assumes feeling to be the self...

"He assumes perception to be the self...

"He assumes (mental) fabrications to be the self...

"He assumes consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness. This is how self-identification comes about."

"But, lady, how does self-identification not come about?"

"There is the case where a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for noble ones, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of integrity, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma — does not assume form to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in form.

"He does not assume feeling to be the self...

"He does not assume perception to be the self...

"He does not assume fabrications to be the self...

"He does not assume consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness. This is how self-identification does not come about."
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby Dr. Dukkha » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:20 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
Dr. Dukkha wrote:
daverupa wrote:Lack of knowing the cause, lack of knowing the cure.

More generally, lack of knowing the possibility.


"Forever."
"Forever" what?

Also, would you mind changing your avatar. This image and the filmed version of it were things I lived through in the 60's when it happened. It was disturbing then, and it remains so. The monk in the photo should not have his photograph used in such a casual manner.


I'm sorry about that. I will be sure to do that.
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:21 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:
I'm sorry about that. I will be sure to do that.
Thank you. It is appreciated.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Is it worth being friends with this girl?

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:31 pm

Never, ever be prepared to change or sacrifice your principles to make someone else satisfied. In every sense of the word.

The moment we compromise our ideals, we are a liar - both to others and to ourselves.

Sitting firmly on the box marked 'personal Ethics' and keeping the lid on things, does nobody any favours.

She was obvioulst dismayed by your disarming honesty.

If someone wants you in an image they have formed of you, then really, (I hate to say it) but they are not worthy of the effort.
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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‘Absit invidia verbo’ - may ill-will be absent from the word. And mindful of that, if I don't respond, this may be why....
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Re: Severely attached to the Dhamma.

Postby culaavuso » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:32 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:If I could drop the Dhamma for a little bit, I'd probably be happier than being so hooked onto it that I can't even small talk anymore. Buddhism this, Buddhism that. That's all I can say and I'm spiraling.


If the problem is with speech, it might be helpful to consider practices of Right Speech.

AN 10.176: Cunda Sutta wrote:And how is one made pure in four ways by verbal action? There is the case where a certain person, abandoning false speech, abstains from false speech. When he has been called to a town meeting, a group meeting, a gathering of his relatives, his guild, or of the royalty, if he is asked as a witness, 'Come & tell, good man, what you know': If he doesn't know, he says, 'I don't know.' If he does know, he says, 'I know.' If he hasn't seen, he says, 'I haven't seen.' If he has seen, he says, 'I have seen.' Thus he doesn't consciously tell a lie for his own sake, for the sake of another, or for the sake of any reward. Abandoning false speech, he abstains from false speech. He speaks the truth, holds to the truth, is firm, reliable, no deceiver of the world. Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord. Abandoning abusive speech, he abstains from abusive speech. He speaks words that are soothing to the ear, that are affectionate, that go to the heart, that are polite, appealing & pleasing to people at large. Abandoning idle chatter, he abstains from idle chatter. He speaks in season, speaks what is factual, what is in accordance with the goal, the Dhamma, & the Vinaya. He speaks words worth treasuring, seasonable, reasonable, circumscribed, connected with the goal. This is how one is made pure in four ways by verbal action.


MN 58: Abhayarājakumāra Sutta wrote:
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial (or: not connected with the goal), unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.
  • In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing & agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.
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Re: Can you identify as Buddhist and still reach Nirvana?

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:50 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:In esoteric Hinduism, non-self is considered to include any identity. In their method, if I identified myself as a Buddhist, I couldn't reach enlightenment. I'd have to not identify myself, be nothing, to reach enlightenment. Does Buddhism teach this?

If so, could I not reach enlightenment with a sense of Jewish identity?


This I have found to be true for me:

I can practise any religion on the planet I choose, and fully incorporate Buddhism and all it teaches, as a support and pinion to that religion.

I cannot practise Buddhism as my primary calling, and choose that, but also hope to incorporate any other religions wholeheartedly.

If I have chosen Buddhism, after a while, with much deliberation, examination, thought, cogitation, meditation and appraisal - I must release any other dogma, and abandon the religion in its entirety.

It cannot be done, in that order of things.

I can 'go to Heaven' if I practise Christianity, Judaism, Islam.....Buddhism is a natural companion.

I cannot consider myself able to fulfil the required criteria in other religions, if i have primarily taken to Buddhism.

Buddhism supports, endorses and can replace.

it cannot be wholeheartedly adhered to, and be accompanied or supported by the others.
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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‘Absit invidia verbo’ - may ill-will be absent from the word. And mindful of that, if I don't respond, this may be why....
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Re: Can you identify as Buddhist and still reach Nirvana?

Postby purple planet » Wed Jul 16, 2014 8:26 pm

Buddhist monks and also very advanced and respected buddhist monks use the words "I" "me" "you" ect ...

Lots of them also tell stories about their personal life

Buddhism is a way of becoming a better person -(not a crazy person) so whatever you read in buddhism if it seems to make you a worse person...than you probably got it wrong - if it makes you a nicer better person you probably got it right

examples : if your "angry" and you see the anger as non-self - you know the anger is not who you are but just something you experience at the moment you can let it go more easier - and become a better person = this is a right way of understanding non-self

If you stop using words like "i,me,you" ect than you become crazy - you got something wrong

if you become less greedy more nice you understand buddhism correct
if you become more angry and snub people cause they dont know much about buddhism - you didnt understand something right

answer is yes by the way (lol) you can identify as a jew and reach nibana - identify whatever you want on the outside be buddhist, jewish whatever fits you whatver helps you in your life

the wrong ways understanding this can be :

im jewish/buddhist this people are not i am better cause im jewish/buddhist
im jewish/buddhist so i cant go to my sisters jewish/buddhist wedding - i cant participate in this jewish/buddhist holiday cause im jewish/buddhist
ect ect...
Please send merit to my dog named Mika who has passed away - thanks in advance
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Re: Can you identify as Buddhist and still reach Nirvana?

Postby SarathW » Wed Jul 16, 2014 9:16 pm

Hi Dr Dukkha
Yes Buddha taught not to attached to Dhamma. Hence not to have a self identification as a Buddhist.
Dhamma is considered a raft to cross the Samasaric river.
Once you cross the river he advised us to discard the raft (Dhamma)
Four Noble Truths are considered a fabrication.
Please refer to Culavusso reply.
:)
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby SarathW » Wed Jul 16, 2014 9:34 pm

Hi Dukkha
In relation to your OP:
Buddha did not say samsara has no beginning.
He said it is inconceivable.

By the way you don't have to know who built the house to break it.
:)
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Re: Severely attached to the Dhamma.

Postby Mkoll » Wed Jul 16, 2014 10:35 pm

TheNoBSBuddhist wrote:As the lute strings should be neither too tight, nor too loose, to make pleasant and melodious sounds, so your practice should be balanced and in tune with your life.
:goodpost:

Yes, the lute strings metaphor definitely applies here.
Peace,
James
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Re: How can samsara have no beginning but has an end?

Postby Jason » Wed Jul 16, 2014 10:53 pm

Dr. Dukkha wrote:If it's been going on forever, why haven't we all been enlightened by now?


From the Buddhist point of view, all conditional things, whether they have a definite beginning point or not, persist for only as long as the conditions for their existence persist:

    When this is, that is.
    From the arising of this comes the arising of that.
    When this isn't, that isn't.
    From the cessation of this comes the cessation of that.

In this case, whether you view samsara as referring the continual cycle of death and rebirth of beings or to the continual cycle of death and rebirth of the conceit 'I am,' the self-identification that designates a being (satta), it's a conditional process that persists for as long as the requisite causes and conditions persist. Once those cease, the cycle of samsara ceases or breaks down.

The teachings on dependent co-arising details the casually-determined psychological process by which suffering and stress arises in the mind, and which conditions the arising of future suffering and stress. Although the basic concept is expressed by the formula, "When this is, that is. From the arising of this comes the arising of that. When this isn't, that isn't. From the stopping of this comes the stopping of that," it's expressed more fully (in the context of the arising and cessation of stress and suffering) in the form of dependent co-arising:

    From ignorance as a requisite condition come fabrications.
    From fabrications as a requisite condition comes consciousness.
    From consciousness as a requisite condition comes name-&-form.
    From name-&-form as a requisite condition come the six sense media.
    From the six sense media as a requisite condition comes contact.
    From contact as a requisite condition comes feeling.
    From feeling as a requisite condition comes craving.
    From craving as a requisite condition comes clinging/sustenance.
    From clinging/sustenance as a requisite condition comes becoming.
    From becoming as a requisite condition comes birth.
    From birth as a requisite condition, then aging-&-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair come into play. Such is the origination of this entire mass of suffering & stress.

    Now from the remainderless fading and cessation of that very ignorance comes the cessation of fabrications. From the cessation of fabrications comes the cessation of consciousness. From the cessation of consciousness comes the cessation of name-&-form. From the cessation of name-&-form comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation of the six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling comes the cessation of craving. From the cessation of craving comes the cessation of clinging/ sustenance. From the cessation of clinging/sustenance comes the cessation of becoming. From the cessation of becoming comes the cessation of birth. From the cessation of birth, then aging-&-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair all cease. Such is the cessation of this entire mass of suffering & stress. (Ud 1.3)

There are a multitude of factors and conditions that gives rise to this psycho-physical chain within the mind, all of which are mutually dependent; but there are places in the chain where, with mindfulness and effort, one can disrupt one of the links in this chain, much like a mental resonance point, which in turn can disrupt the entire causal chain, ultimately leading to a mental-state empty of passion, aversion, and delusion.

As for the question, If it's been going on forever [or at least a very long time], why haven't we all been enlightened by now?, I think it's based on the assumption that we're all moving towards nibbana in some sort of blind, teleological fashion when awakening generally requires a certain number of supporting conditions (SN 12.23). In other words, there's no reason to assume that all beings are heading towards nibbana, however you define the term.

In the Pali Canon, for example, there are at least two places where the question of whether all beings will attain liberation is addressed. The first is AN 10.95, where Uttiya the wanderer, after asking a number of other metaphysical questions, asks the Buddha if all the world will reach release, or a half of it, or a third. In this instance, the Buddha remains silent, and Ananda gives an analogy to explain the Buddha's silence:

    "Uttiya, suppose that there were a royal frontier fortress with strong ramparts, strong walls & arches, and a single gate. In it would be a wise, competent, & knowledgeable gatekeeper to keep out those he didn't know and to let in those he did. Patrolling the path around the city, he wouldn't see a crack or an opening in the walls big enough for even a cat to slip through. Although he wouldn't know that 'So-and-so many creatures enter or leave the city,' he would know this: 'Whatever large creatures enter or leave the city all enter or leave it through this gate.'

    "In the same way, the Tathagata isn't concerned with whether all the cosmos or half of it or a third of it will be led to release by means of that [Dhamma]. But he does know this: 'All those who have been led, are being led, or will be led [to release] from the cosmos have done so, are doing so, or will do so after having abandoned the five hindrances — those defilements of awareness that weaken discernment — having well-established their minds in the four frames of reference, and having developed, as they have come to be, the seven factors for Awakening. When you asked the Blessed One this question, you had already asked it in another way. That's why he didn't respond."

The second reference is in the Questions of King Milinda, a later work that's included in the Khuddaka Nikaya of the Burmese edition of Pali Canon, but not in Thai or Sri Lankan versions. Here, King Milinda asks whether everyone attains nibbana, to which the Ven. Nagasena (an arahant who's thought to have lived some time around 150 BCE) responds:

    “Not all, O king; but whoever conducts himself rightly, understands what should be understood, perceives what should be perceived, abandons what should be abandoned, develops what should be developed and realises what should be realised; he attains nibbāna.”

In addition, there's also the possibility that there there are infinite beings and infinite amount of time, which means there's the potential for there to be an infinite number of both awakened and non-awakened beings at any given point.

Those are some of my thoughts on the matter, at any rate.
"Sabbe dhamma nalam abhinivesaya" (AN 7.58).

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