Was Buddha a spoil sport?

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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby bodom » Wed Feb 10, 2010 7:35 pm

Annapurna wrote:And to all football lovers:

I apologize if I hurt your feelings. I do have my own superbowls, rest assured. ;)

ok? :hug:

Anna (don't hate me please)


I dont hate you. I would never hate anyone over a game. Well maybe just Broncos fans. :tongue: Just kidding.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby cooran » Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:31 pm

bodom said: I would never hate anyone over a game. Well maybe just Broncos fans. Just kidding.

What?!!!!

How can such a thing be????

ONYA Broncos!!!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brisbane_Broncos
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby Annapurna » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:14 pm

bodom wrote:
Annapurna wrote:And to all football lovers:

I apologize if I hurt your feelings. I do have my own superbowls, rest assured. ;)

ok? :hug:

Anna (don't hate me please)


I dont hate you. I would never hate anyone over a game. Well maybe just Broncos fans. :tongue: Just kidding.

:anjali:


That's great, Bodom. :group:
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby bodom » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:26 pm

cooran wrote:
bodom said: I would never hate anyone over a game. Well maybe just Broncos fans. Just kidding.

What?!!!!

How can such a thing be????

ONYA Broncos!!!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brisbane_Broncos


Haha no, these Broncos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denver_Broncos

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby cooran » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:29 pm

OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby bodom » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:34 pm

cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


:jumping: you need them when your playing against guys that are as big as trucks and just as fast.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:47 pm

cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)

But what do I know? I'm a fan of association football and aussie football. Werd. Them be real sports. =D
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Feb 10, 2010 10:26 pm

Greetings,

seanpdx wrote:aussie football. Werd.


Go Saints!

Metta,
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Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby Cittasanto » Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:20 pm

seanpdx wrote:
cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)


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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby bodom » Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:27 pm

seanpdx wrote:
cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)

But what do I know? I'm a fan of association football and aussie football. Werd. Them be real sports. =D


Read these articles and tell me helmets are for pansy's. I guess the real men will be all the ones with brain damage at the end of their careers. Oh and by the way aussie's dont hit hard enough to need helmets. Haha just kidding just kidding.

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference ... index.html
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:19 am

Manapa wrote:
seanpdx wrote:
cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)




Ha! Good times, good times. =D
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:20 am

bodom wrote:
seanpdx wrote:
cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)

But what do I know? I'm a fan of association football and aussie football. Werd. Them be real sports. =D


Read these articles and tell me helmets are for pansy's. I guess the real men will be all the ones with brain damage at the end of their careers. Oh and by the way aussie's dont hit hard enough to need helmets. Haha just kidding just kidding.


Then thar be fightin' words! :guns:
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:28 am

seanpdx wrote:
Ha! Good times, good times. =D

Really???
:tongue:
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:46 am

Manapa wrote:
seanpdx wrote:
Ha! Good times, good times. =D

Really???
:tongue:


I just watched that movie again not two weeks ago! =D
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby baratgab » Thu Feb 11, 2010 4:57 pm

Annapurna wrote:I think to abandon some desires is hard at times. Like, if you don't want to contribute to animals suffering and so want to eat less meat, or become a Vegetarian. I've gone without meat for many months, but then I eat meat again!


Yes, I understand your position. :smile: But my perspective is that if we can't feel these changes as a gain in the here and now, then this is a sign that our motivation, attitude or intention is maybe not in line with the dhamma. Of course the point is not to criticize anybody, but just to express what could be the most important area of development. After all we, western people, conditioned by this materialistic culture, are quite prone to focus on the externalities: I should eat less, I should sleep less, I should do more meditation, I should give more donations... And at the same time we very rarely question our motivation, attitude or intention with which we are eating, sleeping, meditating or giving donations. If only the externalities change, of course that the change is hard and the craving remains. On the other hand, if the change happens in our motivation, attitude or intention, the change in the externalities can be almost automatic.

So, if you have problems with craving for meat (as your example goes), maybe this is because you are a meat-eater who doesn't eat meat.

I have spoken to somebody 2 weeks ago who harshly condemned celibacy as "unnatural"...he said it was impossible for him to go without, -but monks can.


Yes, it is natural. Suffering in samsara is natural too. So I would be careful about how much nature I want. ;) Usually this is how my argument goes about this. :smile:
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:32 pm

baratgab wrote:
Annapurna wrote:I think to abandon some desires is hard at times. Like, if you don't want to contribute to animals suffering and so want to eat less meat, or become a Vegetarian. I've gone without meat for many months, but then I eat meat again!


Yes, I understand your position. :smile: But my perspective is that if we can't feel these changes as a gain in the here and now, then this is a sign that our motivation, attitude or intention is maybe not in line with the dhamma. Of course the point is not to criticize anybody, but just to express what could be the most important area of development. After all we, western people, conditioned by this materialistic culture, are quite prone to focus on the externalities: I should eat less, I should sleep less, I should do more meditation, I should give more donations... And at the same time we very rarely question our motivation, attitude or intention with which we are eating, sleeping, meditating or giving donations. If only the externalities change, of course that the change is hard and the craving remains. On the other hand, if the change happens in our motivation, attitude or intention, the change in the externalities can be almost automatic.

So, if you have problems with craving for meat (as your example goes), maybe this is because you are a meat-eater who doesn't eat meat.

I have spoken to somebody 2 weeks ago who harshly condemned celibacy as "unnatural"...he said it was impossible for him to go without, -but monks can.


Yes, it is natural. Suffering in samsara is natural too. So I would be careful about how much nature I want. ;) Usually this is how my argument goes about this. :smile:


:goodpost:
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby Annapurna » Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:59 pm

Yes, good posting! :thumbsup:

I think you are basically saying that with a lack of insight, we also lack the energy to "live it".

But if we have insight, changing is inevitable and natural/ easy.

Things just fall away.

Right?
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby baratgab » Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:13 pm

Annapurna wrote:I think you are basically saying that with a lack of insight, we also lack the energy to "live it". But if we have insight, changing is inevitable and natural/ easy. Things just fall away. Right?


Well, yes. What I tried to emphasize is that the difficulties with the practice are not part of the dhamma, but part of our mistaken comprehension of the dhamma. There is no need to make ourselves tired and weary, and then rationalize our experiences by saying that the present hardship is for some future benefit. I believe that if one practice with a skilful comprehension of the dhamma, then there is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures, then there is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures, then is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures... directly and consistently. :smile:

As I outlined my standpoint in another post previously:

"If you think about it, worldly humans need so much stuff not because they appreciate them, but precisely because they don't appreciate them. Since discontentment is an attitude problem, and not a problem of material scarcity, their emphasis on mere materiality cannot lead to any sort of fulfilment; they are destined to an endless running for a never-to-be contentment, very much like a dog chasing his own tail. On the other hand, the path of Buddhism puts the emphasis on the very attitudes which determine our experience with the materiality. By paying more and more attention, making peace and appreciating things more and more, we are more and more contented, and eventually we need less and less. This path is the recluse life that the Buddha encouraged, in my view: one that arises from a mind thoroughly suffused with peace and contentment. And this is quite in contrary with finding faults in what we have and denying ourselves from them, which only leads to frustration, depression and craving, because the underlying attitude problem is not alleviated, but aggravated."
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby seanpdx » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:11 pm

baratgab wrote:
Annapurna wrote:I think you are basically saying that with a lack of insight, we also lack the energy to "live it". But if we have insight, changing is inevitable and natural/ easy. Things just fall away. Right?


Well, yes. What I tried to emphasize is that the difficulties with the practice are not part of the dhamma, but part of our mistaken comprehension of the dhamma. There is no need to make ourselves tired and weary, and then rationalize our experiences by saying that the present hardship is for some future benefit. I believe that if one practice with a skilful comprehension of the dhamma, then there is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures, then there is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures, then is more ease and less dependence on sense-pleasures... directly and consistently. :smile:

As I outlined my standpoint in another post previously:

"If you think about it, worldly humans need so much stuff not because they appreciate them, but precisely because they don't appreciate them. Since discontentment is an attitude problem, and not a problem of material scarcity, their emphasis on mere materiality cannot lead to any sort of fulfilment; they are destined to an endless running for a never-to-be contentment, very much like a dog chasing his own tail. On the other hand, the path of Buddhism puts the emphasis on the very attitudes which determine our experience with the materiality. By paying more and more attention, making peace and appreciating things more and more, we are more and more contented, and eventually we need less and less. This path is the recluse life that the Buddha encouraged, in my view: one that arises from a mind thoroughly suffused with peace and contentment. And this is quite in contrary with finding faults in what we have and denying ourselves from them, which only leads to frustration, depression and craving, because the underlying attitude problem is not alleviated, but aggravated."


Well said! Huzzah! =D
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Re: Was Buddha a spoil sport?

Postby Thales » Thu Feb 11, 2010 11:36 pm

bodom wrote:
seanpdx wrote:
cooran wrote:OMG! They wear motorcycle helmets when playing football?? :jumping:


Yep. It's weird. American football players are kinda pansy like that. ;)

But what do I know? I'm a fan of association football and aussie football. Werd. Them be real sports. =D


Read these articles and tell me helmets are for pansy's. I guess the real men will be all the ones with brain damage at the end of their careers. Oh and by the way aussie's dont hit hard enough to need helmets. Haha just kidding just kidding.

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference ... index.html


NFL helmets protect the skull not the brain. No helmet that I know of can prevent the brain from sloshing around up there anyway

Edit: I played american football from 5th grade through high school and I am very lucky that I escaped with only 1 or 2 concussions. For that reason I wish I had never played and would not allow my son to play; if that makes me a spoil sport, so be it.
"Just as the ocean has a single taste, the taste of salt, so this Dhamma and Discipline has a single taste, the taste of release."

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