Monks splashing blood. No authority at the monkhood?

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Re: Monks splashing blood. No authority at the monkhood?

Postby alan » Sun Mar 21, 2010 5:13 pm

Thanks for the interesting link!

*Losing respect for the Thais on a daily basis.*
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Re: Monks splashing blood. No authority at the monkhood?

Postby Mukunda » Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:56 pm

alan wrote:Thanks for the interesting link!

*Losing respect for the Thais on a daily basis.*


Why? Are they different than anyone else? Doesn't appear so to me.
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Re: Monks splashing blood. No authority at the monkhood?

Postby suriyopama » Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:13 am

Mukunda wrote:
alan wrote:Thanks for the interesting link!

*Losing respect for the Thais on a daily basis.*


Why? Are they different than anyone else? Doesn't appear so to me.


Neither to me. In Thailand I've found the most generous, tolerant, affectionate, respectful and charming people that I've ever met (both monks and lay people). That's one of the many reasons that keeps me happily living in this amazing country.
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Re: Monks splashing blood. No authority at the monkhood?

Postby gavesako » Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:37 pm

If you are interested in the Buddhist and Brahmin rituals which are part of the current protests in Bangkok, they are described in detail here:

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandal ... #more-8635


... The following day, 14 March, the day of the big gathering, more Red Shirts arrived. In a media stunt a few boats of Red Shirts arrived from Ayutthaya. At Sanam Luang maybe 500 Red Shirt monks camped out, and went on a short march to the main stage. Several of the monks blessed protesters with sacred water, sprinkled and splashed the protesters with short grass brooms, attendants holding the bowls with the sacred water. ...

... Two distraught officials of the Democrat Party, who had pleaded with the protesters not to spill the blood at their entrance during the melee, stood with a bowl of sacred water and waited until the scene was clear. When I asked them if that is “Naam Mon” (sacred water), they answered evadingly that this were just normal water to clean the mess. They were quite embarrassed when I pointed out that bits of wax from candles usually do not float in normal water. I apologised though for the mess created by us journalists. Soon they proceeded to spill the bowl of sacred water at the edge of the blood. The blood was then professionally cleaned, and I found a hose to wash my feet which were covered in blood.

Over the following days I spoke several times with Sakrapee Promchart — the Brahmin priest who performed the cursing ceremony, and who has been with the Red Shirt movement since its beginning. It was quite difficult as this was a topic which soon reached the limits of my language abilities.

The “saab cheng”(curse) he used is the strongest possible curse and will last for more than 100 years. There is no possible counter ceremony, and could only be lifted by the one performing the curse. Also the spilling of sacred water by the Democrat Party officials was of no use, he said, but shows that they were aware of the power of this curse. Neither was the more elaborate ceremony led by Deputy Prime Minister Suthep Thaugsuban the following day of any use. The curse itself is of Thai Brahmanistic origin, not of Indian origin. Also during the reign of King Naresuan in the Ayutthaya period blood ceremonies to clean Chao Mae Toranee (the goddess of the earth) were performed. It is a highly unusual “Khun Sai” (Black Magic) ceremony, and only rarely performed by Brahmins. The last time this particular curse was performed was during the foundation of a prison in the district of Ban Pranang, Nakhorn Sri Thammarat province, about 100 hundred years ago. Even though such a curse has bad effects on the one performing it he still accepted those as he felt this curse was for the good of the land, as it was against those he considered bad people – the government. He also mentioned that a further reason for this particular curse was that the Democrat Party used Chao Mae Toranee in their party symbol, the goddess he prays to as well. He also said that spilling blood in this way would help prevent bloodshed. This point was also mentioned by a Red Shirt villager from Isaarn I talked with.

The day after the ceremony the priest was behind the stage, and very angry over media reports of Phra Ratchakru Wamadhepmuni, head of the royal Brahmin priests, who denounced his Brahmin heritage by stating that his father was removed from his position due to misbehavior. Sakrapee Promchart countered that his father, still alive and 100 years old, retired due to old age, and that Phra Ratchakru Wamadhepmuni was too young at the time. He also said that due to his ancestry and education he is a Brahmin priest. ...
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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