Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

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Re: Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

Postby Collective » Wed May 26, 2010 11:18 pm

Shonin wrote:Our ability to go on 'automatic pilot' (not traditional Buddhist terminology I know) while driving a car or walking is very useful.

This is very interesting to me as I've experienced this and I also labelled as 'going to the store on auto-pilot'. Like arriving there and wondering how I got there.

What is this exactly? Is it good, bad? Weird thing is I am always aware and in control.
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Re: Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

Postby Tex » Wed May 26, 2010 11:23 pm

Shonin wrote: :tongue: You might want to shift your right hand over to the left very slightly


Haha, I was about to google "lomd" expecting to see some profound aboriginal word!
"The serene and peaceful mind is the true epitome of human achievement."-- Ajahn Chah, Living Dhamma

"To reach beyond fear and danger we must sharpen and widen our vision. We have to pierce through the deceptions that lull us into a comfortable complacency, to take a straight look down into the depths of our existence, without turning away uneasily or running after distractions." -- Bhikkhu Bodhi
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Re: Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

Postby Ben » Wed May 26, 2010 11:26 pm

Collective wrote:
Shonin wrote:Our ability to go on 'automatic pilot' (not traditional Buddhist terminology I know) while driving a car or walking is very useful.

This is very interesting to me as I've experienced this and I also labelled as 'going to the store on auto-pilot'. Like arriving there and wondering how I got there.

What is this exactly? Is it good, bad? Weird thing is I am always aware and in control.


Its certainly not mindfulness, that is for sure.
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


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Re: Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

Postby Ben » Wed May 26, 2010 11:28 pm

Tex wrote:
Shonin wrote: :tongue: You might want to shift your right hand over to the left very slightly


Haha, I was about to google "lomd" expecting to see some profound aboriginal word!


No such luck, Tex! I don't think I know any profound aboriginal words.
metta

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com
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Re: Eckhart Tolle: The Power of Now

Postby Pannapetar » Thu May 27, 2010 2:41 am

Collective wrote:This is very interesting to me as I've experienced this and I also labelled as 'going to the store on auto-pilot'. Like arriving there and wondering how I got there.


It's probably important to distinguish automatic functioning of certain activities from absent-mindedness. There are plenty of body functions that are always on autopilot. In particular, these are the functions controlled by the autonomic nervous system. For example, one is normally not consciously aware of the heartbeat (unless feeling the pulse), or of digestion, or of salivation. The breath is an interesting exception, because the breath is an autonomic function that one can -unlike other autonomic functions- control consciously. Then there are motor actions and motor control. The brain has the capacity to store and recall patterns (programs) of complicated motor action, such as riding a bicycle or playing a piece on the piano. Once these motor control programs are learned through repetition, they can be executed with reduced involvement of consciousness, which is an immensely useful survival feature. Obviously, this is what one would call "conditioning". The object of meditation is NOT to unlearn such conditioning, but to become aware of conditioned patterns by piercing through them. The object of mindfulness is to prevent conditioned patterns from causing inadequate or undesirable responses and to keep body and mind alert, malleable, sensitive, and responsive.

Cheers, Thomas
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