Ekottara Agama 17.1

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.

Ekottara Agama 17.1

Postby jcsuperstar » Fri Feb 06, 2009 7:21 am

i have no idea where to put this, but thought you guys might like it. it's from the chinese canon and i dont think it's in the pali. ~jc

Seventh Fascicle


Ānāpāna[smṛti] (a)



<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[1]<!--[endif]-->‘Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was staying in Śrāvastī, at the Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍada’s Park. Then, in time, the Exalted One put on his [outer] robes and took up his alms-bowl. Entering the city of Śrāvastī, he was followed by Rāhula.

Caring for the latter, he turned to the right and looking back, said: Now, Rāhula, you must contemplate form as being impermanent.

Certainly, Exalted One, replied Rāhula, form is impermanent.

O Rāhula, the Exalted One went on to say, feeling, perception, formative forces, and consciousness – they are all absolutely impermanent.

Again Rāhula responded: Certainly, Exalted One; feeling … and consciousness – all are impermanent. – Now Venerable (bhadanta) Rāhula thought to himself: For what reason (kiṁkāraṇa) am I being cared for while just reaching the city? And why is it that on the way the Exalted One admonishes (avavadati) me? Now I ought to return to my place; no need to enter the city and beg for alms-food.

So, midway on the spot, Venerable Rāhula returned to the Jetavanavihāra<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[2]<!--[endif]-->, and with robes and alms-bowl, he proceeded to the root of a tree and sat down cross-legged (paryaṅka), straightening body and mind. Fully concentrated and with one-pointedness of mind (cittaikāgratā), he contemplated form, feeling, perception, formative forces, and consciousness as being impermanent.

Meanwhile, the Exalted One had finished begging for alms-food at Śrāvastī and, after his repast at the Jetavanavihāra, he took his walking-exercise (caṅkramaṇa). In the course of time he came to the place where Rāhula was to be found and addressed him as follows:

You should practise [mindfulness of] breathing (ānāpānasmṛti). If such is your practice (dharma) all sorrow (śokasaṁjñā) you may experience is bound to be completely left behind. You are still in the grip of worldly ways<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[3]<!--[endif]--> and muddled thinking. Covetousness (lobha) and attachment (anunaya) have to be eradicated.

Now, Rāhula, you should cultivate friendliness (maitrī) in your heart. You have already cultivated it, but any dislike (dveṣa), any aversion (pratigha) still in existence – an end has to be put to all that once and for all. O Rāhula, you must also cultivate a heart [full of] compassion (karuṇā). You have surely cultivated it, but even the slightest [tendencies towards] cruelty (vihiṁsā) in your heart have to be wiped out. You must further cultivate a heart [full of] sympathetic joy (muditā). [Although] you have already done so, you must [persist in your practice in order to] cleanse your heart totally of jealousy (īrṣyā). O Rāhula, do cultivate equanimity (upekṣā)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[4]<!--[endif]-->. You have certainly been doing so, [but continue cultivating it] so as to extirpate conceit (māna) and arrogance (mada).

Thereupon the Exalted One addressed these verses to Rāhula:

Eschew once and for all attachment to views and

Always follow [instead] the Teaching wholeheartedly.

He who is endowed [due to Dharma practice] with [insight]

Knowledge will therefore be held in esteem everywhere.

Holding [aloft] for mankind the torch of wisdom (vidyā),

One will dispel the darkness [of delusion] and [thus]

Be deeply respected by gods and nāgas.

[This is the] proper [way of] venerating one’s Master.

Thereupon the bhikṣu Rāhula, in reply to the Exalted One, uttered the following verses:

I will not be attached to views and will

Always follow the Teaching. {T 2, 582a}

Being endowed with [insight-]knowledge [due to

Dharma practice], [I will] thus be able [really] to venerate the Master.

Having given this instruction, the Exalted One left and went back to his [own] quiet room, whilst Venerable Rāhula was wondering how one would practise [mindfulness of] breathing, abandon [vain] thoughts and overcome all sorrow. Then Rāhula rose from his seat and went to the Exalted One’s whereabouts. On his arrival, he bowed down his head at [the Exalted One’s] feet and sat down at one side. Presently (muhūrtena), he rose again and asked the Exalted One:

How does one practise [mindfulness of] breathing, abandon [vain] thoughts and overcome all sorrow? How does one obtain as sublime result (mahāphala) the taste of deathlessness (amṛtarasa)?

The Exalted One replied: well said, well said, (sādhu), Rāhula! You are indeed capable of asking this question and thereby ‘roaring the lion’s roar’ (siṁhanādanādin) in front of the Tathāgata: How does one practise [mindfulness of] breathing … the taste of deathlessness? Now, Rāhula, listen attentively and take heed (śṛṇu sādhu ca suṣṭhu ca manasi-kuru)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[5]<!--[endif]-->. The time has come for me to elucidate and give you details (nir-diś).

Just so, Exalted One, replied Rāhula. While Venerable Rāhula [joined his hands as a token of reverence] to receive the Exalted One’s Teaching, he was given the following instruction:

A bhikṣu intent on a quiet, secluded and really lonely place [goes there], sits down cross-legged and straightens body and mind. Concentrating on the tip of his nose without letting mental proliferation (nānātva) arise, he breathes out<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[6]<!--[endif]--> a long [breath] and is fully aware of it; breathing in a long [breath], he is fully aware of it; breathing out a short [breath], he is fully aware of it; breathing in a short [breath], he is fully aware of it; breathing out a cool [breath] … breathing in a cool [breath] …, breathing out a warm [breath] … breathing in a warm [breath], he is fully aware of it. He contemplates the whole bodily [process of] inhaling and exhaling<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[7]<!--[endif]--> and is fully aware of everything. When there is breathing he is fully aware of its presence, and when there is no breathing, he is fully aware of its absence. In the event of breathing out conditioned by the mind, he is fully aware of it; and in the event of breathing in conditioned by the mind, he is fully aware of it. In this way, Rāhula, one can practise [mindfulness of] breathing and thereby abandon all thoughts of aversion and confusion (vikṣiptasaṁjñā), overcome all sorrow and thus obtain the taste of deathlessness as sublime result.

When the Exalted One had imparted this subtle Teaching (sūkṣmadharma) in some detail to Rāhula, the latter rose from his seat, paid his respects at the Buddha’s feet, circumambulated<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[8]<!--[endif]--> [the former] thrice and left. Rāhula went to the foot of a tree in the Andhavana<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[9]<!--[endif]-->, sat down cross-legged and straightened body and mind, concentrating on the tip of his nose without letting any redundant (adhika) thoughts arise. Breathing out a long [breath] he was fully aware of it; breathing in a long [breath], he was fully aware of it; breathing out a short [breath] … a cool [breath] … a warm [breath] …, he was fully aware of it. He contemplated the whole bodily [process of] inhaling and exhaling and was fully aware of everything. When there was breathing … and no breathing, he was also fully aware of its absence. In the event of breathing out … breathing in conditioned by the mind, he was again fully aware of it.

Then Rāhula wisely (manasi-kṛ) thus: A mind full of attachment subsequently set free from [all passions] is cleansed (nirmukta) of all that is karmically unwholesome (akuśala). He [entered and] remained in the first absorption (dhyāna) in which there is thinking, deliberation (savitarka, savicāra)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[10]<!--[endif]--> and mindfully experiencing joy (prīti) and happiness (sukha).

Upon the cessation of thinking and deliberation, he [realised] perfect inner quiet and perfect concentration (adhyātmam samprasāda, cetasa ekotībhāva)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[11]<!--[endif]-->. He [entered and] remained in the second absorption in which there is neither thinking nor deliberation, yet mindfully experiencing joy [born] of concentration (samādhija).

Then perfectly mindful, after the cessation of joy (niṣprītika), while experiencing just that physical well-being (sukhaṁ ca kāyena pratisaṁvedayati)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[12]<!--[endif]--> which the Noble Ones experience (upa-labh) with equanimity<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[13]<!--[endif]-->, complete satisfaction (paritoṣa) and mindfulness, he [entered and] remained in the third absorption.

When he had gone beyond (prahāṇa)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[14]<!--[endif]--> pleasure and pain and was rid of sorrow, he [entered and] remained in the forth absorption which is free of both suffering and happiness and utterly pure [because of] equanimity and mindfulness.

With the help of this concentration, his mind became utterly pure and was rid of flaws (rajas) and blemished (doṣa), while his body was exceedingly supple (mṛdu). He recognised places from the past and remembered what he had previously done. He vividly (dravyatas) recognised his [former] abodes<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[15]<!--[endif]--> during incalculable aeons. He also remembered former existences (jāti) – one, two, three, four, five, ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, a hundred, a thousand, ten thousand, several hundred thousand previous lives, a period of evolution and of destruction [of the world] (vivarta, saṁvartakalpa), innumerable periods of evolution and destruction, hundreds of millions, incalculable aeons. [He remembered:] I was born and had such and such a name, belonged to such and such a lineage, had such and such food, experienced such and such pains and pleasures, had [such and such] long and short life-spans. There I died, here I was reborn; here I died [again] and was reborn there. –

With the help of this concentration, his mind was utterly pure and rid of flaws, blemishes and all fetters (saṁyojana). Furthermore, he [directed his] mind to the knowledge of beings’ coming into existence. With the purified and immaculate ‘divine eye’ (divyacakṣus) he saw [many] kinds of beings – how they are born and how they die. He understood in accordance with fact (yathābhūtam) that [beings] are good-looking, ugly, well-destined or ill-destined – depending respectively on their good and bad behaviour (carita) and deeds (kṛta). [He understood that] on the one hand, there are beings who bodily, vocally and mentally misbehaved, insulted the Noble Ones, held false views, performed actions determined by false views, and who, at the breaking up of the body and after their death, have gone to hell (naraka); that, on the other hand, there are beings who bodily, vocally and mentally behaved well, did not insult the Noble Ones, always held right views, performed actions determined by right views and who, at the breaking up of the body and after death, have gone to a good, a heavenly world (sugati, divyam). This [superknowledge (abhijnā) of his] is called the purified and immaculate ‘divine eye’ [thanks to which he] saw [many] kinds of beings …. [and thanks to which he] understood in accordance with fact that [beings] are good-looking … depending respectively on their good and bad behaviour and deeds.

Moreover, he directed his mind to effect the destruction (kṣaya) of the mind’s malign influences (āsrava). He realised and knew in accordance with fact: This is unsatisfactoriness (duḥkha); he realised and knew in accordance with fact the origin (samudaya)<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[16]<!--[endif]--> of unsatisfactoriness, its final cessation (duḥkhanirodha) and what has necessarily to be done (avaśyakārya) in order to overcome unsatisfactoriness<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[17]<!--[endif]-->.

By dint of such penetrating insight (vipaśyanā), his mind was freed from the malign influences of desire (kāmāsrava), of becoming (bhava) and of ignorance (avidyā). Having realised [ultimate] freedom (vimukti), he gained the [insight-]knowledge of this freedom and knew in accordance with fact: Birth and death have come to an end, the holy life (brahmacarya) has been lived, what had to be done has been done, and there will be no more coming into existence.

At that time Venerable Rāhula became an Arhat<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[18]<!--[endif]--> and, after his realisation of arhatship, he rose from his seat, adjusted his robes and went to the Exalted One’s whereabouts. [There] he bowed down his head at [the Exalted One’s] feet, stood to one side and said to the Exalted One: [My] aspirations have come true: the eradication of all malign influences.

Then the Exalted One said to all the bhikṣus [present]: among all those who realised arhatship, none is like Rāhula. For what reason? As far as the eradication of malign influences is concerned, there is the bhikṣu Rāhula [who achieved it] and in respect of observing rules and of being given to training (śikṣā), there is again Rāhula [who excels]. All previous Tathāgatas and Perfectly Enlightened Ones, too, had this bhikṣu Rāhula [as their son]<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[19]<!--[endif]-->, and it was the bhikṣu Rāhula who was anxious that he should be called ‘son of the Buddha’ who himself, following the Buddha, reached the ultimate goal (dharma). – Amongst my disciples, the Exalted One went on saying to the bhikṣus, the foremost among those capable of observing the rules of training is the bhikṣu Rāhula<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[20]<!--[endif]-->.

Then the Exalted One uttered these verses:

[If one] conscientiously [observes] the rules of moral training

One will perfect all one’s spiritual faculties (indriya).

One has to [develop them] step by step until one reaches [the ultimate goal]

Completely ridding oneself of all fetters. –

Having listened to the Exalted One’s words, all the bhikṣus were pleased and respectfully applied themselves to practice’.



<!--[if !supportEndnotes]-->

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<!--[endif]-->
<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[1]<!--[endif]--> See T 2, 581b29 ff, and its Japanese translation at Hayashi, p.124 ff; cf. M I, 420 ff. (Mahā-Rāhulovādasutta); I.B. Horner, The Middle Length Sayings II, 91 ff. This translation originally published as Ekottaragama XV, Buddhist Studies Review 10.2, 1993, p 213-222. Translated from the Chinese version byThích Huyên-Vi in collaboration with Sara Boin-Webb and Bhikkhu Pāsādika

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[2]<!--[endif]--> After Hackman, p.67.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[3]<!--[endif]--> Lit kumārga

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[4]<!--[endif]--> Lit. the Chinese corresponds to ārakṣācitta, ‘a mind given to protection’.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[5]<!--[endif]--> Cf. for instance, Mahāvyut, 6215.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[6]<!--[endif]--> I.e. āśvāsa-praśvāsa which, according to the Chinese EĀ means ‘exhalation and inhalation’; also the St Petersburg Sanskrit dictionary and Monier Williams take praśvāsa to mean ‘inhalation’. In general, Pali scholars translate the dvanda compound as ‘inhalation and exhalation’, whilst pundits in Thailand understand it the other way round. In the Index to the Abhidharmakośabhāṣya by A. Hirakawa (Tokyo 1973), however, the Tibetan and Chinese versions of the Sanskrit compound corroborate the interpretation of the majority of scholars: ‘inhalation and exhalation’. See F. Edgerton’s interesting entry in his BHSD, p.110.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[7]<!--[endif]--> Here, contrary to the foregoing, the succession of the respiratory process is reversed. Cf. n.6.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[8]<!--[endif]--> I.e. pradakṣiṇā, see Soothill, p.169a: ‘turning or processing with the right shoulder towards an object of reverence’.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[9]<!--[endif]--> Cf. DPPN I, 111f.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[10]<!--[endif]--> See Mahāvyut. 1478.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[11]<!--[endif]--> Ibid., 1479.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[12]<!--[endif]--> Ibid., 1480.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[13]<!--[endif]--> Cf. n.4.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[14]<!--[endif]--> See Mahāvyut. 1481.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[15]<!--[endif]--> Cf. ibid., 207: pῡrva-nivāsānusmṛti-jñāna.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[16]<!--[endif]--> After Hayashi’s reading.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[17]<!--[endif]--> I.e. duḥkhanirodhagāminī pratipad: the path leading to the final cessation of unsatisfactoriness.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[18]<!--[endif]--> ottaragama XV, Buddhist Studies Review 10.2, 1993, p 213-222According to the Pāli tradition, at the end of the Cūla-Rāhulovādasutta (M III, 277-80; S IV, 105-7), Rāhula’s becoming an Arhat is mentioned (see Malalasekera II, 737-40); an account of his realisation of three kinds of superknowledge (abhijñā), viz. remembrance of former existences, the ‘divine eye’ and eradication of all malign influences, is not, however, given either at M I, 420ff, or at the above places. For a parallel to Rāhula’s abhijñās, cf. for instance, M I, 22f. (Bhayabheravasutta), I.B. Horner, op. cit. I, 28f; cf. also Nyanaponika, Buddhist Dictionary (revised ed.), Colombo 1956, p.2f.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[19]<!--[endif]--> As for Rāhula’s being mentioned, not as having been the son of ‘all previous Tathāgatas’, but the son of the Bodhisatta referred to in numerous Jātakas, see DPPN II, 739f.

<!--[if !supportFootnotes]-->[20]<!--[endif]--> Cf. A 1.24: Etad aggaṁ bhikkhave mama sāvakānaṁ bhikkhῡnaṁ sikkhākāmānaṁ yadidaṁ Rāhulo
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
User avatar
jcsuperstar
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 5:15 am
Location: alaska

Re: Ekottara Agama 17.1

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Feb 06, 2009 7:44 am

Greetings,

The intro reminds me of the intro to...

MN 62 - Maha-Rahulovada Sutta
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14674
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Ekottara Agama 17.1

Postby jcsuperstar » Fri Feb 06, 2009 7:50 am

it does...

this agama should corespond to the numerical discorses though...
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
User avatar
jcsuperstar
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 5:15 am
Location: alaska

Re: Ekottara Agama 17.1

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:36 am

jcsuperstar wrote:it does...

this agama should corespond to the numerical discorses though...


That may be, but one does find corresponding discourses in different nikaya/agamas.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19558
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: Ekottara Agama 17.1

Postby jcsuperstar » Fri Feb 06, 2009 9:32 am

yeh, its an interesting sutra, nothing as far as i can see that stands out as being out of the ordinary..

maybe its a mash of two?
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
User avatar
jcsuperstar
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 5:15 am
Location: alaska


Return to Lounge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: waryoffolly and 4 guests