The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

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starter
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Tue May 13, 2014 11:14 pm

Miln 335

Whatever medicines are found
In the world — many and varied —
None are equal to the Dhamma.
Drink of this, monks!

And having drunk
The medicine of the Dhamma,
You'll be untouched by age and death.
Having meditated and seen —
(You'll be) healed by ceasing to cling.

starter
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Tue May 20, 2014 1:46 am

Dhammapada 1. Pairs:

“He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.”
Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred.

“He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me.”
Those who do not harbor such thoughts still their hatred.

Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world.
By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased.
This is a law eternal."

Note: "The Buddha's constant advice to His followers is not to retaliate but to practise patience at all times, at all places, even under provocation. The Buddha extols those who bear and forbear the wrongs of others though they have the power to retaliate. In the Dhammapada itself there are many instances to show how the Buddha practised patience even when He was severely criticised, abused, and attacked. Patience is not a sign of weakness or defeatism but the unfailing strength of great men and women."

[The translation is from http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... budd.html; the note is from http://www.metta.lk/english/Narada/01-Y ... gga.htm#N8]
Last edited by starter on Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

starter
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:01 pm

Yamakavagga: Pairs

manopubbaṅgamā dhammā, ~ manoseṭṭhā manomayā,
manasā ce paduṭṭhena ~ bhāsati vā karoti vā,
tato naṁ dukkham-anveti ~ cakkaṁ va vahato padaṁ.

Mind [intentions/thoughts] is the forerunner of states [states of verbal/bodily acts, suffering or happiness, ...].
Mind is their chief; they are all produced by mind.
If with a corrupted mind [with malevolent intentions/thoughts]
a person speaks or acts,
suffering follows him
like the wheel that follows the foot of the ox.

manopubbaïgamà dhammà, manoseññhà manomayà,
manasà ce pasannena bhàsati và karoti và,
tato naü sukham-anveti chàyà va anapàyinã. [2]

Mind [intentions/thoughts] is the forerunner of states.
Mind is their chief; they are all produced by mind.
If with a pure mind [with wholesome intentions/thoughts]
a person speaks or acts,
happiness follows him
like his never-departing shadow.

starter
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:51 am

There are these five themes that should often be reflected upon by a woman or a man, by a householder or one gone forth:

(1) "I am subject to old age; I am not exempt from old age."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] youth's intoxication with youth. Because of that intoxication with youth, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that youth's intoxication with youth will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(2) "I am subject to illness; I am not exempt from illness."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] healthy person's intoxication with health. Because of that intoxication with health, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that healthy person's intoxication with health will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(3) "I am subject to death; I am not exempt from death."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] living person's intoxication with life. Because of that intoxication with life, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that living person's intoxication with life will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(4) "I must be parted and separated from all that is dear and appealing to me."

"There are beings who feel desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing. Because of that passion, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(5) "I am the owner of my kamma/actions, heir to my kamma/actions, born of my kamma/actions, related through my kamma/actions, and have my kamma/actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir."

"There are beings who conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that bad conduct in body, speech, and mind will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

"When he/she often reflects on this, the [factors of the] path take birth. He/she sticks with that path, develops it, cultivates it. As he/she sticks with that path, develops it and cultivates it, the fetters are abandoned, the obsessions destroyed."

[From AN 5.57 Upajjhatthana Sutta: Subjects for Contemplation]

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phil
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby phil » Thu Aug 14, 2014 10:46 pm

starter wrote:There are these five themes that should often be reflected upon by a woman or a man, by a householder or one gone forth:

(1) "I am subject to old age; I am not exempt from old age."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] youth's intoxication with youth. Because of that intoxication with youth, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that youth's intoxication with youth will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(2) "I am subject to illness; I am not exempt from illness."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] healthy person's intoxication with health. Because of that intoxication with health, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that healthy person's intoxication with health will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(3) "I am subject to death; I am not exempt from death."

"There are beings who are intoxicated with a [typical] living person's intoxication with life. Because of that intoxication with life, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that living person's intoxication with life will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(4) "I must be parted and separated from all that is dear and appealing to me."

"There are beings who feel desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing. Because of that passion, they conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that desire and passion for the things they find dear and appealing will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

(5) "I am the owner of my kamma/actions, heir to my kamma/actions, born of my kamma/actions, related through my kamma/actions, and have my kamma/actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir."

"There are beings who conduct themselves in a bad way in body... in speech... and in mind. But when they often reflect on that fact, that bad conduct in body, speech, and mind will either be entirely abandoned or grow weaker..."

"When he/she often reflects on this, the [factors of the] path take birth. He/she sticks with that path, develops it, cultivates it. As he/she sticks with that path, develops it and cultivates it, the fetters are abandoned, the obsessions destroyed."

[From AN 5.57 Upajjhatthana Sutta: Subjects for Contemplation]


I teach English as a second language as my vocation and although it is considered an old-fashioned method I encourage students to memorize sentences in order to internalize the target language. Internalizing the Buddhist teachings certainly a good idea as long as we can avoid ascribing some sort of magic power to it. I think I will use my phone's voice recorder to read the target passages out loud and listen later, that is another good way to help in the process.

I will start with this one Starter has selected. The Buddha recommends reflecting on it often as we know.

Phil
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)

starter
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby starter » Fri Sep 12, 2014 11:01 pm

Hi Phil and other friends,

Thanks for your good effort.

I'd like to add another selection which is helpful for establishing moral fear and shame of wrong doings:

"Those in whom shame and fear of wrong,
Are not consistently found,
Have deviated from the bright root,
And are led back to birth and death.

But those in whom shame and fear of wrong,
Are consistently ever present,
Peaceful, mature in the holy life,
They put an end to renewal of being."

[From http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .irel.html]

May all of us good progress in the path!

Starter

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby gben » Mon Jan 12, 2015 7:20 pm

It is important to think of why memories are cultivated. If there is no paper or ink or other recording method available then it has to suffice.

It is important to know that nobody is going to find their way to freedom just because they can parrot the words of others.

It is pretty worn out and cliched, but it is a classic example where the teacher tries to point at freedom while the student never understands but sits there and just looks at the finger! Making a drawing of the pointing hand is no more a picture of freedom than any string of words.

Buddhas don't remember words as they are dead things while freedom is always new. Each time a buddha puts what is real into words it will be done in a different way and yesterday's words are to be washed away and forgotten with each new moment.

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Subharo
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Kāḷakārāma Sutta excerpt

Postby Subharo » Tue Sep 15, 2015 6:42 pm

Respectful Greetings, Bhante Khemaratana, :anjali:

I've chosen an excerpt from the Kāḷakārāma Sutta (from the Aṅguttara Nikāya, Book of the Fours).

Note: Thanissaro Bhikkhu's translation here: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.024.than.html

...and Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation is here: https://suttacentral.net/en/an4.24

...but in the case of this particular sutta, I've chosen to quote from Bhikkhu Ñānananda's translation (found in “The Magic of the Mind: An Exposition of the Kalakarama Sutta” ISBN-13: 978-9552401350, Pariyatti Press):


Thus, monks, a Tathāgata does not conceive of a visible thing apart from sight;
he does not conceive of an unseen;
he does not conceive of a 'thing-worth-seeing';
he does not conceive about a seer.

He does not conceive of an audible thing as apart from hearing;
he does not conceive of an unheard;
he does not conceive of a 'thing-worth-hearing';
he does not conceive about a hearer.

He does not conceive of a thing to be sensed as apart from sensation;
he does not conceive of an unsensed;
he does not conceive of a 'thing-worth-sensing';
he does not conceive about one who senses.

He does not conceive of a cognizable thing as apart from cognition;
he does not conceive of an uncognized;
he does not conceive of a 'thing-worth-cognizing';
he does not conceive about one who cognizes.

Thus, monks, the Tathāgata being such-like in regard to all phenomena seen, heard, sensed and cognized, is 'Such'. Moreover, than he who is 'Such', there is none other greater or more excellent, I declare.

Whatever is seen, heard, sensed, or clung to,
is esteemed as truth by other folk,
Midst those who are entrenched in their own views
Being “Such” I hold none as true of false.

This barb I beheld, well in advance,
whereupon mankind is hooked, impaled,
“I know, I see, 'tis verily so” – no such clinging
for the Tathāgatas.


:bow:

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Subharo
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby Subharo » Tue Sep 15, 2015 7:09 pm

gben wrote:Buddhas don't remember words as they are dead things while freedom is always new. Each time a buddha puts what is real into words it will be done in a different way and yesterday's words are to be washed away and forgotten with each new moment.


Here's a passage from the arahat disciple Ananda, which I think would clash with your view (that the Dhamma should not be memorized). Quoted from the Theragāthā, Verses of the Senior Monks, Chapter of the Thirties 17.3 "Ānanda" https://suttacentral.net/en/thag17.3:

You should stay close to a learned person—
Don’t lose what you’ve learned.
It is the root of the spiritual life,
So you should memorize the Dhamma.

Knowing the sequence and meaning of the teaching,
Skilled in the interpretation of terms,
He makes sure it is well memorized,
And then examines the meaning.

Accepting the teachings, he becomes enthusiastic;
Making an effort, he scrutinizes the Dhamma;
Striving at the right time,
He is serene inside himself.

If you want to understand the Dhamma,
You should associate with the sort of person
Who is learned, and has memorized the Dhamma,
A wise disciple of the Buddha.

A monk who is learned, and has memorized the Dhamma,
A keeper of the great sage’s treasury,
Is a visionary for the entire world,
Venerable, and learned.

Delighting in Dhamma, enjoying Dhamma,
Reflecting on Dhamma,
Recollecting Dhamma,
He doesn’t decline in the true Dhamma.
Subharo Bhikkhu
"There is but one taste on this path, the taste of freedom" -The Buddha :buddha1:

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby dhammarelax » Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:58 am

Hi,

I have just memorized the MN 38 and starting MN 111. Based on draft calculations is taking me about 10 minutes to memorize one line (BB translation) does anyone have a comparison on this?

smile all the time
dhammarelax
MN 38: "Abandoning harsh speech he abstains from harsh speech, he speaks words that are gentle, pleasant to the ear, and loveable as go to the heart, are courteous, desired by many and agreeable to many"

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Re: Kāḷakārāma Sutta excerpt

Postby Spiny Norman » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:22 am

Subharo wrote:I've chosen an excerpt from the Kāḷakārāma Sutta (from the Aṅguttara Nikāya, Book of the Fours).


Thanks, that's a really interesting sutta. I have an AN anthology but I don't think that sutta is included unfortunately.
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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 6:38 pm

But it is available here:
https://suttacentral.net/an4.24

:anjali:
Mike

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Re: The Dhamma Wheel Memorization Challenge

Postby gben » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:32 pm

Subharo wrote:Here's a passage from the arahat disciple Ananda, which I think would clash with your view (that the Dhamma should not be memorized).


Only for those who mistake words for reality or truth does it clash. One can remember all the words in the world and still understand nothing about them or what their writer or speaker sees, memory has nothing to do with understanding.

Once the real world is seen, once there is freedom, then there is also freedom from memory including written and spoken texts. The Buddha certainly does not refer to written or spoken words each moment to remain a Buddha. A Buddha does not need words, chants, meditation, memories, hierarchies, Buddhism or the word "Buddha" to be a Buddha.

If that phenomena which is dependent on another is false, then that Buddha or freedom which is dependent on words is false.

To be clear, being free of memory does not mean having no memory. A Buddha can recall the past at will as needed but is not enslaved by it. A Buddha is also free of the future, not because it is incapable of conceptualizing one at will as needed, but as it is done a Buddha is not enslaved by the future or any other conception.

When a Buddha is asked a question it does not have to reply with dead memories, but is capable at any moment of expressing the truth it is in communion with in a way as current as that moment.


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