Action is intention

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altar
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Action is intention

Postby altar » Thu Aug 01, 2013 3:50 pm

I believe there is a quote to the effect of "Action is intention." All i can find on the internet is "It is action which I call intention." But I can't find a sutta reference. Does anyone know what sutta this is from?

Sorry if this is the wrong forum as i'm basically just looking for a reference. But discuss on the sentence is okay.

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Sumano
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Re: Action is intention

Postby Sumano » Thu Aug 01, 2013 4:13 pm

Cetanāhaṃ, bhikkhave, kammaṃ vadāmi. Cetayitvā kammaṃ karoti – kāyena vācāya manasā.


"Intention, I tell you, is kamma. Intending, one does kamma by way of body, speech, & intellect.

AN 6.63


“It is volition, bhikkhus, that I call kamma. For having willed, one acts by body, speech, or mind.

AN 6.63
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lyndon taylor
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Re: Action is intention

Postby lyndon taylor » Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:58 pm

Actually I think its intention precedes and predicates action, they are two different words.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community that has so generously given me so much, sincerely former monk John

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lyndon taylor
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Re: Action is intention

Postby lyndon taylor » Thu Aug 01, 2013 10:09 pm

For instance you can have the intention to mow the lawn, but the action of actually getting started mowing it might take an hour or two weeks.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community that has so generously given me so much, sincerely former monk John

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Cittasanto
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Re: Action is intention

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:38 pm

lyndon taylor wrote:For instance you can have the intention to mow the lawn, but the action of actually getting started mowing it might take an hour or two weeks.

there are acts of body speech & mind. and as mind precedes all phenomena (Dhp1 & 2), and intention is a mental action it is, as the above quote from AN6 says, Kamma.
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