Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
ccook70
Posts: 86
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:50 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001

Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby ccook70 » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:12 am

Hello,

I would like to take retreats in the future.
At the monastery, how would I address the monks when speaking?

How to address a monk in written letter form?

Thanks!

Corey

User avatar
pilgrim
Posts: 1002
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 6

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby pilgrim » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:25 am

You can't go wrong if you just address him as "Bhante", whether by speech or in writing.

ccook70
Posts: 86
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:50 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby ccook70 » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:29 am

:thanks:

ccook70
Posts: 86
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:50 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby ccook70 » Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:47 am

You mean "Bhante, (Last Name)" or just "Bhante?"

User avatar
cooran
Posts: 7817
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:32 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Queensland, Australia

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby cooran » Tue Feb 04, 2014 1:18 am

Just "Bhante".

Bhante or Ajahn by Ajahn Sujato
http://sujato.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/bhante-or-ajahn/

With metta,
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

ccook70
Posts: 86
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:50 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby ccook70 » Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:14 am

:thanks:

User avatar
Mkoll
Posts: 4219
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:55 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1006
Location: California, USA

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby Mkoll » Tue Feb 04, 2014 3:13 am

There's also other matters of etiquette like not pointing your feet at people, especially monks.

Minor Matters of Etiquette

Vinaya also extends into the realm of convention and custom. Such observances, which it mentions, are not 'rules' but skillful means of manifesting beautiful behaviour. In monasteries, there is some emphasis on such matters as a means of establishing harmony, order and pleasant relationships within a community. Lay people may be interested in applying such conventions for their own development of sensitivity, but it should not be considered as something that is necessarily expected of them.

Firstly, there is the custom of bowing to a shrine or teacher. This is done when first entering their presence or when taking leave. Done gracefully, at the appropriate time, this is a beautiful gesture, which honours the person who does it; at an inappropriate time, done compulsively, it can appear foolish to onlookers. Another common gesture of respect is to place the hands so that the palms are touching, the fingers pointing upwards and the hands held immediately in front of the chest. This is a pleasant means of greeting, bidding farewell, saluting the end of a Dharma talk or concluding an offering.

Body language is something that is well understood in Buddhist cultures. Apart from the obvious reminder to sit up for a Dharma talk rather than loll or recline on the floor one shows a manner of deference by ducking slightly if having to walk between a monk and the person he is speaking to. Similarly, one would not stand looming over a monk to talk to him or offer him something, but rather approach him at the level at which he is sitting.

"Good is restraint in body,
restraint in speech is good,
good is restraint in mind,
everywhere restraint is good;
the bhikkhu everywhere restrained
is from all dukkha free."

Dharmapada no. 361

http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/bud ... yguide.htm
Peace,
James

User avatar
Cittasanto
Posts: 5876
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Ellan Vannin
Contact:

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:43 pm

Bhante is the safest form of address for a monk, and Ayya for a nun. Ajahn, Tan, Ashin, Sayadaw are country specific terms (\former two Thai and the latter two Burmese).
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

chris98e
Posts: 127
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 12:52 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1006

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby chris98e » Tue Feb 11, 2014 6:50 am

Thanks for letting me know to address a monk as Bhante. An interesting story, I brought a friend to a Buddhist Temple. And after we both got done bowing to the Buddha a monk came out and my friend started talking to the monk about a dream he had or visions he had or something like that. After the monk was done talking to my friend, my friend put his arm around the monk as a sign of appreciation. Then the monk looked at me to see if I knew that it was inappropriate to touch a monk, even if the touching is an act of kindness. I quickly told my friend that its inappropriate to touch a monk. I knew only because a few days latter I read on the internet that it's inappropriate to touch a monk i.e. handshaking. :buddha2:

User avatar
appicchato
Posts: 1603
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:47 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Bridge on the River Kwae

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby appicchato » Tue Feb 11, 2014 8:06 am

Re:Thailand...you never hear 'Bhante'...usually (phonetically) 'Loong Paw' (Venerable Father (for abbots and monks one does, or doesn't know (generally speaking))...or 'Loong Pee' (Venerable Uncle' (usually used when addressing a monk one knows))...or 'Loong Dta' (Venerable Grandfather' (an old(er) monk, known or not))...and there's always 'Ajahn'...but not to an abbot (always 'Loong Paw')...if the monk has a title ('Tan Chao', 'Maha', 'Pra Khru', etc.) it's best to use it...everyone might not agree but this has been my experience...

User avatar
forestmat
Posts: 138
Joined: Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:50 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 6
Location: Northeastern Thailand

Re: Etiquette & How to Address a Monk

Postby forestmat » Sat Feb 15, 2014 11:29 pm

appicchato wrote:Re:Thailand...you never hear 'Bhante'...usually (phonetically) 'Loong Paw' (Venerable Father (for abbots and monks one does, or doesn't know (generally speaking))...or 'Loong Pee' (Venerable Uncle' (usually used when addressing a monk one knows))...or 'Loong Dta' (Venerable Grandfather' (an old(er) monk, known or not))...and there's always 'Ajahn'...but not to an abbot (always 'Loong Paw')...if the monk has a title ('Tan Chao', 'Maha', 'Pra Khru', etc.) it's best to use it...everyone might not agree but this has been my experience...


Namassakarn,

agreed, I generally address monks as Tan Ajahn, or alternatively Luangpor if I'm certain or suspect they might be the abbot (in Thailand).


Return to “General Theravāda discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], paul and 4 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine