Parāyanasutta

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Parāyanasutta

Postby echalon » Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:21 pm

In the Winter 2009 issue of Buddhadharma, in the article "Gautama vs. the Buddha", Glenn Wallis gives a translation of a portion of the Parāyanasutta. There's nothing new in here by any stretch of the imagination, but it has a very compact summary of the path and a wonderful call to action at the end of it. I found it very inspiring, and I would highly recommend reading it. As far as I can tell, the only English translation available online is in a copy of the article on Glenn Wallis' website. You can find it at http://www.glennwallis.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/BD_W_09_Wallis.29493350.pdf. For those interested in the Pali text, you can find it at http://studies.worldtipitaka.org/tipitaka/13S4/9/9.2/9.2.33 or at http://www.tipitaka.org/romn/cscd/s0304m.mul8.xml (all the way at the bottom, #409). Wallis' translation includes only the first portion of the sutta. Enjoy!
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby bodom » Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:33 pm

I enjoyed his Dhammapada translation and commentary as well.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby echalon » Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:54 pm

I spoke to the author through email, and he said it would be fine for me to reproduce the translation here, so here it is. It was originally published in his book Basic Teachings of the Buddha.

Destination
I will teach the destination and the path leading to the
destination. Listen to what I say. What is the destination?
The eradication of infatuation, the eradication of hostility,
and the eradication of delusion is what is called the
destination. And what is the path leading to the destination?
Present-moment awareness directed toward the body.
This awareness is what is called the path leading to the
destination.

In this way, I have taught to you the destination and
the path leading to the destination. That which should be
done out of compassion by a caring teacher who desires
the welfare of his students, I have done for you.

There are secluded places. Meditate, do not be negligent!
Don’t have regrets later! This is my instruction to you.
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby bodom » Fri Jan 15, 2010 2:03 am

[There are secluded places. Meditate, do not be negligent!
Don’t have regrets later! This is my instruction to you.


Although wallis has a different take this saying for me has always been the most inspirational in all the canon.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby echalon » Fri Jan 15, 2010 3:08 pm

bodom wrote:
[There are secluded places. Meditate, do not be negligent!
Don’t have regrets later! This is my instruction to you.


Although wallis has a different take this saying for me has always been the most inspirational in all the canon.


Frankly, I'm not sure how you could put in "there are feet of trees" and make it sound right. I think "secluded places" is a pretty good gloss for the combination of rukkhamūlāni and suññāgārāni. (Is that the 'different take' you were referring to?)
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby bodom » Fri Jan 15, 2010 3:18 pm

echalon wrote:
bodom wrote:
[There are secluded places. Meditate, do not be negligent!
Don’t have regrets later! This is my instruction to you.


Although wallis has a different take this saying for me has always been the most inspirational in all the canon.


Frankly, I'm not sure how you could put in "there are feet of trees" and make it sound right. I think "secluded places" is a pretty good gloss for the combination of rukkhamūlāni and suññāgārāni. (Is that the 'different take' you were referring to?)


There are these roots of trees, these empty huts. MEDITATE, Ananda, DO NOT DELAY, or else you will regret it later. This is our instruction to you."

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby echalon » Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:46 pm

bodom wrote:
There are these roots of trees, these empty huts. MEDITATE, Ananda, DO NOT DELAY, or else you will regret it later. This is our instruction to you."



Where did you get this version from? (I don't mean to sound questioning, I'm genuinely curious!) Looking at the Pali versions I have access to (linked above), I don't see any mention of Ananda. Looking at the PTS Dictionary, Wallis' "negligent" seems to match with "pamādattha" and his "don't have regrets later" seems to match "mā pacchā vippaṭisārino ahuvattha" pretty well. But definitely the same idea.
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby bodom » Fri Jan 15, 2010 9:57 pm

echalon wrote:
bodom wrote:
There are these roots of trees, these empty huts. MEDITATE, Ananda, DO NOT DELAY, or else you will regret it later. This is our instruction to you."



Where did you get this version from? (I don't mean to sound questioning, I'm genuinely curious!) Looking at the Pali versions I have access to (linked above), I don't see any mention of Ananda. Looking at the PTS Dictionary, Wallis' "negligent" seems to match with "pamādattha" and his "don't have regrets later" seems to match "mā pacchā vippaṭisārino ahuvattha" pretty well. But definitely the same idea.


I cannot remember which sutta this is in but MN 8 has these same instructions given to the disciple Cunda.

There are these roots of trees, there are empty places. Meditate, Cunda, do not delay, lest you later regret it. 'This is my message to you."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nypo.html

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Parāyanasutta

Postby echalon » Fri Jan 15, 2010 10:27 pm

bodom wrote:I cannot remember which sutta this is in but MN 8 has these same instructions given to the disciple Cunda.

There are these roots of trees, there are empty places. Meditate, Cunda, do not delay, lest you later regret it. 'This is my message to you."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nypo.html


Yep, the Pali is indeed the same for that last bit. (http://studies.worldtipitaka.org/tipitaka/9M/1/1.8/1.8.5, ¶255) Thanks for that, it's always nice to see the connections in the Tipitaka.
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