conventions for pitch in chanting?

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Re: conventions for pitch in chanting?

Postby Cittasanto » Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:03 pm

Sanghamitta wrote:Ah but Manapa. :smile: .if you listen to the Queen herself recorded 50 years ago and more recently there is a huge difference in her pronounciation of certain words, it has softened considerably over the years.

Is the Chithust /Amaravati chanting consided authentic in the sense of pronounciation ?


in case anyone doesn't know the Queens (or Kings) English is a pseudonym for Received Pronunciation or BBC English, the standard form of English either written or spoken, not regional meaning, dialect, or slang terms. it is not a term which denotes off-shoot languages such as Scottish, or American which have their own particular linguistic norms. myself speaking Manx-English, just to confuse you all more.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
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Re: conventions for pitch in chanting?

Postby echalon » Wed Feb 03, 2010 3:50 pm

mikenz66 wrote:
echalon wrote:Is it possible to derive the tone solely from the Pali syllable, with no explicit tone marks, like in that webpage?

Yes, part of learning to read Thai script is the tone rules...
Which are quite complicated as you can see from the "Tone Rule Summary" table on that page you linked to: http://www.thai-language.com/ref/tone-rules

You need to know the "class" of the consonant (low, mid high), whether the syllable is "live" or "dead" (long or short basically), whether it has an tone mark, and then apply the algorithm. Quite logical really... The Pali transliterations don't have tone marks, so that simplifies it a bit...

And then there are some slightly tricky exceptions, such as if there is no vowel then an "a" will get stuck in (as in svakkhato, which becomes sa wak khaa to)

Not something I'd suggest worrying about unless you actually want to learn Thai.

The place I linked to: http://www.thai2english.com/online/ will accept Thai script and figure out the rules for you...

Metta
Mike


I was never intending to memorize the rules myself, but rather write a computer program to do it for me, quite like the one you've pointed to. I already did one to indicate the syllable length, and I found it wonderfully helpful. I suppose I'll use that program as a start, thanks!
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Re: conventions for pitch in chanting?

Postby echalon » Wed Feb 03, 2010 3:53 pm

Manapa wrote:in case anyone doesn't know the Queens (or Kings) English is a pseudonym for Received Pronunciation or BBC English, the standard form of English either written or spoken, not regional meaning, dialect, or slang terms. it is not a term which denotes off-shoot languages such as Scottish, or American which have their own particular linguistic norms. myself speaking Manx-English, just to confuse you all more.


I realize this is pretty :offtopic: , but I can't resist adding that in fact the English of Shakespeare's time was much more similar to modern American accents than to Received Pronunciation. Go figure!
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