Extra-Canonical Theravada Texts

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism

Re: Extra-Canonical Theravada Texts

Postby pt1 » Sat Feb 06, 2010 4:29 am

Thanks for pointing out my mistake retro. I guess a better way to put it would have been to say that all things are impermanent, sasana included. Whether one sees a particular action as restoration/destruction of the sasana - that's down to speculative views, and there's little point arguing these, which is why I felt links to the mentioned works might be a little more useful than arguing.

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Re: Extra-Canonical Theravada Texts

Postby BlackBird » Sat Feb 06, 2010 11:51 am

Buddha's Dancer wrote:Also, simply the fact of something being a matter of opinion does not make the opinion wrong.


Indeed, could you please explain to me why you think these texts are 'just as precious and virtuous' as the Nikayas?

Buddha's Dancer wrote:To establish the truth or otherwise of a statement or thesis you need to use logic.


I agree, let's hear your's.

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Re: Extra-Canonical Theravada Texts

Postby Paññāsikhara » Sat Feb 06, 2010 12:23 pm

BlackBird wrote:
Buddha's Dancer wrote:To establish the truth or otherwise of a statement or thesis you need to use logic.


I agree, let's hear your's.


Actually, logic won't help that much.

For instance, if the premises are false, then a logically coherent statement may still be wrong.
eg. all human beings are reptiles, reptiles are cold blooded, therefore human beings are cold blooded.

Or, even when a statement is logically incoherent, the conclusion may still be true.
eg. all human beings are mammals, mammals are warm blooded, therefore snakes are cold blooded.

Logic can only help as a tool to organize knowledge and draw conclusions from that, however, it is sufficient to produce new knowledge in an of itself. For that, other means are necessary. Usually, good arguments will contains both true premises and coherent logic, to draw further true conclusions.
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