Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

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Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 6:15 am

Any one know why the lone Buddhas live their life without teaching the Dhamma? I assume they didn't teach because they have no disciples. Is it because they did not have the ability to teach it? Even so, with their awakening, do they not at least try? Despite that, I really admire them since they attain enlightenment without ever hearing the Dhamma before.

I hear it's impossible for a Paccebabuddha to appear while the teaching of Dhamma still floats about in the world? Is that true? Couldn't someone who live in a remote region where Buddhism has not reach become a Paccebuddha? I can't see why it's not possible.
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby cooran » Fri May 21, 2010 6:35 am

Hello wind,

This might be of assistance:
pacceka-buddha
an 'Independently Enlightened One'; or Separately or Individually (=pacceka) Enlightened One (renderings by 'Silent' or 'Private Buddha' are not very apt).
This is a term for an Arahat (s. ariya-puggala) who has realized Nibbāna without having heard the Buddha's doctrine from others. He comprehends the 4 Noble Truths individually (pacceka), independent of any teacher, by his own effort. He has, however, not the capacity to proclaim the Teaching effectively to others, and therefore does not become a 'Teacher of Gods and Men', a Perfect or Universal Buddha (sammā-sambuddha). -
Pacceka-buddhas are described as frugal of speech, cherishing solitude. According to tradition, they do not arise while the Teaching of a Perfect Buddha is known; but for achieving their rank after many eons of effort, they have to utter an aspiration before a Perfect Buddha.
Canonical references are few; Pug. 29 (defin.); A.II.56; in M.116, names of many Pacceka-buddhas are given; in D.16 they are said to be worthy of a thūpa (dagoba); the Treasure-Store Sutta (Nidhikhandha Sutta, Khp.) mentions pacceka-bodhi; the C. Nidd. ascribes to individual Pacceka-buddhas the verses of the Rhinoceros Sutta (Khaggavisāna Sutta, Sn.) - See bodhi.
See The Pacceka-Buddha, by Ria Kloppenborg (WHEEL 305/307).
http://www.palikanon.com/english/wtb/n_ ... buddha.htm

Pacceka Buddha
The name given to one who is enlightened by and for himself - i.e., one who has attained to supreme and perfect insight, but who dies without proclaiming the truth to the world - hence the equivalent "Silent Buddha" sometimes found in translations. Pacceka Buddhas practise their pāramī for at least two thousand asankheyya kappas. They are born in any of the three kulas: brāhmana, khattiya, or gahapati only in a vivattamāna kappa, during which Buddhas are also born, but they never meet a Buddha face to face. They cannot instruct others; their realization of the Dhamma is "like a dream seen by a deaf mute." They attain to all the iddhi, samāpatti and patisanhidā of the Buddhas, but are second to the Buddhas in their spiritual development. They do ordain others; their admonition is only in reference to good and proper conduct (abhisamācārikasikkhā).
Sometimes (e.g., at J.iv.341) it is stated that a Pacceka Buddha's knowledge and comprehension of ways and means is less than that of a Bodhisatta. They hold their uposatha in the Ratanamālaka, at the foot of the Mañjūsarukkha in Gandhamādana. It is possible to become a Pacceka Buddha while yet a layman, but, in this case, the marks of a layman immediately disappear. Three caves in the Nandamūlakapabbhāra - Suvannaguhā, Maniguhā and Rajataguhā - are the dwelling places of Pacceka Buddhas. Round the Ratanamālaka, q.v. (or Sabbaratanamālaka), seats are always ready to receive the Pacceka Buddhas. When a Pacceka Buddha appears in the world, he immediately seeks the Ratanamālaka, and there takes his appointed seat. Then all the other Pacceka Buddhas in the world assemble there to meet him, and, in reply to a question by the chief of them, he relates the circumstances which led to his enlightenment. Similarly, all the Pacceka Buddhas assemble at the same spot when one of them is about to die. The dying one takes leave of the others, and, after his death, they cremate his body and his relics disappear. These details are given in SNA.i.47, 51, 58, 63; KhA.178, 199; ApA.i.125; see also s.v. Gandhamādana.
But, according to another account, they die on the mountain called Mahāpapāta (q.v.). There does not seem to be any limit to the number of Pacceka Buddhas who could appear simultaneously. In one instance, five hundred are mentioned as so doing, all sons of Padumavatī (q.v.), at the head of whom was Mahāpaduma. In the Isigili Sutta (M.iii.68ff ) appears a long list of Pacceka Buddhas who dwelt on the Isigili Mountain (q.v.), and after whom the mountain was named.
According to Buddhaghosa (MA.ii.889ff), the names in this list belonged to the five hundred sons of Padumavatī, but the number of the names is far less than five hundred. This discrepancy is explained by saying that as many as twelve bore the same name. Other names are found scattered over different texts, such as the Jātakatthakathā. E.g., Darīmukha (J.iii.240), Sonaka (v.249); see also DhA. iv.120, etc.
The name occurring most frequently in the texts is that of Tagarasikhī (q.v.). Mention is also made of the Pacceka Buddhas going among men for alms and spending the rainy season in dwellings provided by men. E.g., DhA.ii.112f.; iii.91, 368; iv.200. Their patthanā (SNA.51). Their wisdom less than that of a Bodhisatta (J.iv.341).
Among the teachings preserved of the Pacceka Buddhas, the most important is the Khaggavisāna Sutta (q.v.). For the definition of a Pacceka Buddha see Puggalapiññatti (p.14; cf. p.70). There he is described as one who understands the Truth by his own efforts, but does not obtain omniscience nor mastery over the Fruits (phalesu vasībhāvam).
See also Mātanga (2).
http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_n ... buddha.htm

with metta
Chris
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 6:48 am

Thanks cooran. Paccekabuddhas are great inspirations and good examples that liberation is available to everyone.
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby cooran » Fri May 21, 2010 6:53 am

Hello wind,

A little more:
Khaggavisāna Sutta

The third sutta of the Uraga Vagga of the Sutta Nipāta (SN.vv.35-75), consisting of forty-one stanzas, each of which ends with the refrain: "eko care khaggavisānakappo."
The Commentary (SNA.i.46ff) divides the sutta into four vaggas and gives each a separate name (except the first), the name being generally derived from the first word of the stanza. It is said that the Buddha preached the Khaggavisāna Sutta in response to a question asked of him by Ananda regarding the attainment of Enlightenment by Pacceka Buddhas; the Buddha gave details of their abhinīhara and patthanā, and illustrated them by reciting to Ananda stanzas which had been uttered by Pacceka Buddhas of old on various occasions and at different periods as their paeans of joy (udāna).
Buddhaghosa gives the life-story of each of the Pacceka Buddhas whose stanzas are included in this sutta. It is, however, only in the case of a few Pacceka Buddhas that the actual names are given - e.g.,
Brahmadatta (v.33),
Anitthigandha (36),
Mahāpaduma (39),
Ekavajjika-Brahmadatta (40),
Ekaputtika-Brahmadatta (41),
Cātumāsika-Brahma-datta (44, 64),
Sītāluka-Brahmadatta (52),
Suta-Brahmadatta (58),
Vibhūsaka-Brahmadatta (59),
Pādalola-Brahmadatta (61),
Anivatta-Brahmadatta (62),
Cakkhulola-Brahmadatta (63),
Mātanga (74).
The rest are described as "the king of Benares," or "the son of the king," etc.

The sutta is commented on in the Culla-Niddesa (pp.56ff), in addition to those of the Parāyanavagga, an evidence of the fact that, when the Culla-Niddesa was composed, this was probably regarded as an independent sutta, not belonging to any particular group such as the Uragavagga, and that the comments on it were written at a time prior to the composition of the Sutta Nipāta as an anthology in its present form. This view is further strengthened by the fact that its mixed Sanskrit version in the Mahāvastu (i.357f) is not placed in any definite group. According to the Mahāvastu, the Pratyeka Buddhas, five hundred in number, were living in Rsipatana near Benares, and when they heard from the Suddhāvāsa devas of the approach of the Buddha in twelve years, they disappeared from Rsipatana, each repeating one of the verses of the sutta.
The Apadāna (i.7ff) includes the stanzas of the Khaggavisāna Sutta in its chapter called the Pacceka-buddhāpadāna and prefaces them with several introductory stanzas. A few stanzas are also added at the end by way of conclusion. In its exegesis the Apadāna Commentary (ApA.i.106f) gives the names of several Pacceka Buddhas. They are, however, different from those given by Buddhaghosa, and correspond more nearly to those mentioned in the Isigili Sutta.
http://www.palikanon.com/namen/ku/khaggavisaana.htm

MN 116 Isigili Sutta: The Discourse at Isigili - translated from the Pali by Piyadassi Thera

Thus have I heard:
On one occasion the Blessed One was living on Isigili mountain near Rajagaha. Then he addressed the monks saying, "O monks." "Bhante (Venerable Sir)," replied those monks in assent to the Blessed One. Thereupon he said this:
"Do you, monks, see this Vebhara mountain?"
"Yes, bhante."
"There was another name, monks, for this Vebhara mountain, another designation. Do you, monks, see this Pandava mountain?"
"Yes, bhante."
"There was another name, monks, for this Pandava mountain, another designation. Do you, monks, see this Vepulla mountain?"
"Yes, bhante."
"There was another name, monks, for this Vepulla mountain, another designation. Do you, monks, see this Gijjhakuta mountain?"
"Yes, bhante."
"There was another name, monks, for this Gijjhakuta mountain, another designation. Do you, monks, see this Isigili mountain?"
"Yes, bhante."
"This has been the very name, monks, the very designation for this Isigili mountain. In the past, monks, five hundred paccekabuddhas [1] lived for a long time on this Isigili mountain. As they were entering the mountain they were visible, but once they have entered, they were invisible. People seeing this remarked: 'This mountain swallows these seers (isigilati)'; hence the name Isigili came into being.
"I will tell you, monks, the names of the paccekabuddhas. I will reveal, monks, the names of the paccekabuddhas. Listen, pay close attention, I will speak."
"Yes, bhante," replied the monks.
The blessed One said:
"Arittha, [2] monks, was a paccekabuddha who lived for a long time on this Isigili mountain, Uparittha... Tagarasikhi... Yasassi... Sudassana... Piyadassi... Gandhara... Pindola... Upasabha... Nitha... Tatha... Sutava... Bhavitatta, monks, was a paccekabuddha who lived for a long time on this Isigili mountain.
i. "The names of those supreme beings [3] who are free from sorrow and desire, who have overcome their passions, [4] and have individually attained enlightenment, noble among men. I make known. Listen to me:
ii. "Arittha, Uparittha, Tagarasikhi, Yasassi, Sudassana, Piyadassi the enlightened. [5] Gandhara, Pindola and Upasabha, Nitha, Tatha, Sutava, Bhavitatta.
iii. "Sumbha, Subha, Methula, Atthama, and then Megha, Anigha, Sudatha are paccekabuddhas whose desire for becoming (re-living) is destroyed. Hingu and Hinga of great power.
iv. "The two sages Jali [6] and Atthaka, then Kosala, the enlightened one, then Subahu, Upanemisa, Nemisa, Santacitta, Sacca, Tatha, Viraja, and Pandita.
v. "Kala, Upakala, Vijita and Jita, Anga and Panga and Gutijjita. Passi removed defilements, the root of suffering. Aparajita, conqueror of Mara's might.
vi. "Sattha, Pavatta, Sarabhanga, Lomahamsa, Uccangamaya, Asita, Anasava. Manomaya and Bandhuma, the destroyers of pride; Tadadhimutta, Vimala, and Ketuma.
vii. "Ketumbaraga and Matanga, Ariya. Then Accuta and Accutagamabyamaka. Sumangala, Dabbila, Suppatitthita, Asayha, Khemabhirata, and Sorata.
viii. "Durannaya, Sangha, and Uccaya, and then the sage Sayha of sublime energy. Ananda, Nanda, Upananda, the twelve paccekabuddhas, [7] Bharadvaja bearing his last body. [8]
ix. "Bodhi, Mahanama, and then Uttara; Kesi, Sikhi, Sundara, and Bharadvaja. Tissa, Upatissa, Upasidari, the destroyer of the bonds of becoming, and Sidari, the destroyer of craving.
x. "Mangala was the lust-free paccekabuddha, Usabha who cut away the ensnaring root of suffering. Upanita who attained state of Calm (Nibbana), Uposatha, Sundara, and Saccanama.
xi. "Jeta, Jayanta, Paduma, and Uppala; Padumuttara, Rakkhita, and Pabbata. Manatthaddha, Sobhita, Vataraga, and the paccekabuddha Kanha well freed in mind.
xii. "These and others are paccekabuddhas of great power whose desires for becoming (re-living) are destroyed. Do salute these great sages of immeasurable (virtue) who have gone beyond all attachment [9] and attained Parinibbana."
Notes
1.
They are Buddhas, who have attained enlightenment independent of another's aid, but lack the faculty of convincing others.
2.
For stories connected with these thirteen names see Dictionary of Pali Proper Names, G. P. Malalasekera.
3.
Literally those essences of beings, MA. iv. 129. Having declared the names of these thirteen paccekabuddhas, the names of those others who are the essences of beings, are now revealed in verse.
4.
Literally removed the spike of passions (visalla).
5.
It would appear that the reason why in the Pali stanzas attributes are mentioned in respect of some paccekabuddhas, and not all, is for metrical purposes.
6.
Culla Jali and Maha Jali.
7.
Four Anandas, four Nandas and four Upanandas, MA., iv. 129.
8.
The five aggregates of: body; feelings or sensations; perceptions; formations and consciousness.
9.
Sangha, attachment or grasping, they are: lust, hate, delusion, pride, and false views.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .piya.html

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 7:12 am

What would be the modern day name of this Isigili mountain that the Buddha refer to?
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby cooran » Fri May 21, 2010 7:19 am

Hello Wind, all,

Isigili is nowadays called Sona Hill and is near Rajgir.
http://kalyaano.blogspot.com/2009/12/ra ... landa.html

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: Why did the "lone Buddha" (Paccekabuddha) did not teach?

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 7:31 am

cooran wrote:Hello Wind, all,

Isigili is nowadays called Sona Hill and is near Rajgir.
http://kalyaano.blogspot.com/2009/12/ra ... landa.html

with metta
Chris


Seeing the landscape, now i wonder how did the Paccebabuddhas lived. Did they go on alms round? It didn't seem to have enough vegetation to survive for long periods.
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