The Way It Is (Ajahn Sumedho)

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Tex
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The Way It Is (Ajahn Sumedho)

Postby Tex » Sat Jun 05, 2010 2:43 pm

This is a great collection of transcribed Dhamma talks. Dependent origination is covered in some detail (in the introduction by Ven Sucitto and in 5 talks by Ven Sumedho) and the other topics vary. Just wanted to point it out to any that might not be familiar with it:

http://www.amaravati.org/abmnew/documen ... /cont.html

:buddha2:
"The serene and peaceful mind is the true epitome of human achievement."-- Ajahn Chah, Living Dhamma

"To reach beyond fear and danger we must sharpen and widen our vision. We have to pierce through the deceptions that lull us into a comfortable complacency, to take a straight look down into the depths of our existence, without turning away uneasily or running after distractions." -- Bhikkhu Bodhi

PeterB
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Re: The Way It Is (Ajahn Sumedho)

Postby PeterB » Sat Jun 05, 2010 4:16 pm

The talk Dependant Origination 11..Momentary Arising...... had a particularly strong impact on me.

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bodom
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Re: The Way It Is (Ajahn Sumedho)

Postby bodom » Sat Jun 05, 2010 5:01 pm

Thanks Tex! Im currently reading a book of his collected teachings called The Sound of Silence.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah

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Re: The Way It Is (Ajahn Sumedho)

Postby Tex » Sat Jun 05, 2010 5:35 pm

I especially liked these two passages:

The problem of perception is that it tends to limit us to just being conscious of certain points. We tend to be conscious in certain designated points and the natural change and flux and flow is not really noticed. One is only conscious at the A, B, C, D, E, F, G - the points between A and B are never really noticed because one is only really conscious at the designated points of perception. That is why when the mind is opened with vijja and is receptive, then Dhamma reveals itself, there is a kind of revelation. The empty mind in the state of wonder allows truth to be revealed - not through perception anymore. This is where it is ineffable truth, words fail us and it is impossible to put it into perceptions or concepts.


'Kama-tanha' is quite obvious - it is the desire for pleasurable sense experiences. These forms of desire are to be known and understood. The trap is that we tend to think that the Buddha teaches you to get rid of your desires. That is how some people interpret Buddhism. But that's wrong: the Buddha taught us how to look and understand desire so that we do not grasp it! That's not telling us to get rid of desire but to really understand it so that desire can no longer delude us. The desire to get rid of desire is still desire, it is not looking at desire. With that desire you are just grasping a perception that you shouldn't have desires and you have got to get rid of them. But understanding Dependent Origination we see the tanha as Dhamma rather than as self - you are looking at tanha, the desire as that which arises and ceases. That's Dhamma isn't it? I have not found one desire in twenty-two years of careful looking and close observation that arises and keeps arising. If any of you do find one, please tell me.
"The serene and peaceful mind is the true epitome of human achievement."-- Ajahn Chah, Living Dhamma

"To reach beyond fear and danger we must sharpen and widen our vision. We have to pierce through the deceptions that lull us into a comfortable complacency, to take a straight look down into the depths of our existence, without turning away uneasily or running after distractions." -- Bhikkhu Bodhi


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