subcategories for aggregates

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subcategories for aggregates

Postby convivium » Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:39 am

so form: elements -- earth, air, fire, water ...
feeling: pleasant, unpleasant, neutral
reaction: craving, aversion ...
perseption: ... ?
consciousness: ... ?


how many & what are the other subcatagories for the five aggregates?
Just keep breathing in and out like this. Don't be interested in anything else. It doesn't matter even if someone is standing on their head with their ass in the air. Don't pay it any attention. Just stay with the in-breath and the out-breath. Concentrate your awareness on the breath. Just keep doing it. http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Just_Do_It_1_2.php
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Re: subcategories for aggregates

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:50 am

Greetings convivium,

Interesting question.

Form is an interesting one... does earth, air, fire, water refer to the subjective experience of hardness, motion and so on, or is it referring to objective ontological characteristics of matter? It's a question worth asking.

Another concept with some overlay between the aggregates is nama-rupa, where rupa is defined as per above, and nama (literally: name) which constitues vedana, sanna, cetana, phassa and manasikara (i.e. feelings, perceptions, intentions, contact, attention). See also:

On Understanding Namarupa by Kingsley Heendeniya
http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha262.htm

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: subcategories for aggregates

Postby Anicca » Tue Jun 29, 2010 2:34 am

Howdy convivium!

Here's a few for feelings:
SN 36.22 Atthasatapariyaya Sutta: One Hundred Eight Feelings
"I shall show you, O monks, a way of Dhamma presentation by which there are one hundred and eight (feelings). Hence listen to me.

"In one way, O monks, I have spoken of two kinds of feelings, and in other ways of three, five, six, eighteen, thirty six and one hundred and eight feelings.

"What are the two feelings? Bodily and mental feelings.

"What are the three feelings? Pleasant, painful and neither-painful-nor-pleasant feelings.

"What are the five feelings? The faculties of pleasure, pain, gladness, sadness and equanimity.

"What are the six feelings? The feelings born of sense-impression through eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind.

"What are the eighteen feelings? There are the (above) six feelings by which there is an approach (to the objects) in gladness; and there are six approaches in sadness and there are six approaches in equanimity.

"What are the thirty six feelings? There are six feelings of gladness based on the household life and six based on renunciation; six feelings of sadness based on the household life and six based on renunciation; six feelings of equanimity based on the household life and six based on renunciation.

"What are the hundred and eight feelings? There are the (above) thirty six feelings of the past; there are thirty six of the future and there are thirty six of the present.

"These, O monks, are called the hundred and eight feelings; and this is the way of the Dhamma presentation by which there are one hundred and eight feelings."


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Re: subcategories for aggregates

Postby Shonin » Tue Jun 29, 2010 6:02 am

If I may interject...

retrofuturist wrote:Form is an interesting one... does earth, air, fire, water refer to the subjective experience of hardness, motion and so on, or is it referring to objective ontological characteristics of matter? It's a question worth asking.


...or is this a bit of ontology/metaphysics that we as Westerners tend to impose? The characteristics of matter cannot ultimately be separated from our experiences of it and interactions with it (individual and shared). And Buddha was not interested in ontology or physics but in how our experiences of the world create suffering. The Buddha talked about phenomenology not ontology - he was a pragmatist in that sense - therefore questions about how things really are in themselves did not come up.
Last edited by Shonin on Tue Jun 29, 2010 4:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: subcategories for aggregates

Postby acinteyyo » Tue Jun 29, 2010 3:22 pm

Hi,
convivium wrote:so form: elements -- earth, air, fire, water ...
feeling: pleasant, unpleasant, neutral
reaction: craving, aversion ...
perseption: ... ?
consciousness: ... ?

how many & what are the other subcatagories for the five aggregates?

Parivatta Sutta: The (Fourfold) Round SN22.56
"And what is form? The four great existents and the form derived from them: this is called form. From the origination of nutriment comes the origination of form. From the cessation of nutriment comes the cessation of form. And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of form, i.e., right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

[...]

"And what is feeling? These six classes of feeling — feeling born of eye-contact, feeling born of ear-contact, feeling born of nose-contact, feeling born of tongue-contact, feeling born of body-contact, feeling born of intellect-contact: this is called feeling. From the origination of contact comes the origination of feeling. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feeling. And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of feeling...

"And what is perception? These six classes of perception — perception of form, perception of sound, perception of smell, perception of taste, perception of tactile sensation, perception of ideas: this is called perception. From the origination of contact comes the origination of perception. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of perception. And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of perception...

"And what are fabrications? These six classes of intention — intention with regard to form, intention with regard to sound, intention with regard to smell, intention with regard to taste, intention with regard to tactile sensation, intention with regard to ideas: these are called fabrications. From the origination of contact comes the origination of fabrications. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of fabrications. And just this noble eightfold path is the path of practice leading to the cessation of fabrications...

"And what is consciousness? These six classes of consciousness — eye-consciousness, ear-consciousness, nose-consciousness, tongue-consciousness, body-consciousness, intellect-consciousness: this is called consciousness. From the origination of name-&-form comes the origination of consciousness. From the cessation of name-&-form comes the cessation of consciousness.


best wishes, acinteyyo
Pubbe cāhaṃ bhikkhave, etarahi ca dukkhañceva paññāpemi, dukkhassa ca nirodhaṃ. (M.22)
Api cāhaṃ, āvuso, imasmiṃyeva byāmamatte kaḷevare, sasaññimhi samanake lokañca paññāpemi lokasamudayañca lokanirodhañca lokanirodhagāminiñca paṭipadan. (AN4.45)

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Re: subcategories for aggregates

Postby acinteyyo » Tue Jun 29, 2010 3:31 pm

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings convivium,

Interesting question.

Form is an interesting one... does earth, air, fire, water refer to the subjective experience of hardness, motion and so on, or is it referring to objective ontological characteristics of matter? It's a question worth asking.

I'm sure you probably already read this, maybe it's helpful:
Shorter Notes on nāma by Ven. Ñanavira:
In any experience (leaving out of account arūpa) there is a phenomenon that is present (i.e. that is cognized). The presence, or cognition, or consciousness, of the phenomenon is viññāna (q.v.). The phenomenon has two characteristics, inertia and designation (patigha and adhivacana). The inertia of a phenomenon is rūpa ('matter' or 'substance'), which may be seen also as its behaviour; and this presents itself only in the passage of time (however short). (These four mahābhūtā are the general modes of behaviour or matter: earthy, or persistent and resistant, or solid; watery, or cohesive; fiery, or ripening, or maturing; airy, or tense, or distended, or moving. See RŪPA.) The designation of a phenomenon is nāma ('name'), which may be seen also as its appearance (the form or guise adopted by the behaviour, as distinct from the behaviour itself).


best wishes, acinteyyo
Pubbe cāhaṃ bhikkhave, etarahi ca dukkhañceva paññāpemi, dukkhassa ca nirodhaṃ. (M.22)
Api cāhaṃ, āvuso, imasmiṃyeva byāmamatte kaḷevare, sasaññimhi samanake lokañca paññāpemi lokasamudayañca lokanirodhañca lokanirodhagāminiñca paṭipadan. (AN4.45)

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