What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
User avatar
dragonwarrior
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 1:03 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: somewhere

What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby dragonwarrior » Sun Feb 01, 2009 6:55 am

What's your favorite Buddha's quote? [Share here] :thanks: :namaste:

User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
Posts: 14813
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby retrofuturist » Sun Feb 01, 2009 7:13 am

Greetings Winny,

Rather than a "quote" per se, here is my favourite sutta... it's a small one.

SN 56.31 - Simsapa Sutta
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

User avatar
Jechbi
Posts: 1268
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 3:38 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Jechbi » Sun Feb 01, 2009 7:18 am

His last words.

Vayadhamma sankhara, appamadena sampadetha’ti.

Lots of translations out there.
Last edited by Jechbi on Sun Feb 01, 2009 4:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Rain soddens what is kept wrapped up,
But never soddens what is open;
Uncover, then, what is concealed,
Lest it be soddened by the rain.

Element

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Element » Sun Feb 01, 2009 9:23 am

"'He has been stilled where the currents of construing do not flow. And when the currents of construing do not flow, he is said to be a sage at peace.' Thus was it said. With reference to what was it said? 'I am' is a construing. 'I am this' is a construing. 'I shall be' is a construing. 'I shall not be'... 'I shall be possessed of form'... 'I shall not be possessed of form'... 'I shall be percipient'... 'I shall not be percipient'... 'I shall be neither percipient nor non-percipient' is a construing. Construing is a disease, construing is a cancer, construing is an arrow. By going beyond all construing, he is said to be a sage at peace.

"Furthermore, a sage at peace is not born, does not age, does not die, is unagitated and is free from longing. He has nothing whereby he would be born. Not being born, will he age? Not aging, will he die? Not dying, will he be agitated? Not being agitated, for what will he long? It was in reference to this that it was said, 'He has been stilled where the currents of construing do not flow. And when the currents of construing do not flow, he is said to be a sage at peace.'

MN 140

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 4661
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1006
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby bodom » Sun Feb 01, 2009 1:43 pm

"Then, Bahiya, you should train yourself thus: In reference to the seen, there will be only the seen. In reference to the heard, only the heard. In reference to the sensed, only the sensed. In reference to the cognized, only the cognized. That is how you should train yourself. When for you there will be only the seen in reference to the seen, only the heard in reference to the heard, only the sensed in reference to the sensed, only the cognized in reference to the cognized, then, Bahiya, there is no you in terms of that. When there is no you in terms of that, there is no you there. When there is no you there, you are neither here nor yonder nor between the two. This, just this, is the end of stress."

Ud 1.10

Let one not trace back the past
Or yearn for the future-yet-to-come.
That which is past is left behind
Unattained is the "yet-to-come."
But that which is present he discerns —
With insight as and when it comes.
The Immovable — the-non-irritable.
In that state should the wise one grow
Today itself should one bestir
Tomorrow death may come — who knows?
For no bargain can we strike
With Death who has his mighty hosts.
But one who dwells thus ardently
By day, by night, untiringly
Him the Tranquil Sage has called
The Ideal Lover of Solitude.

MN 131

There are these roots of trees, these rooms that are void: meditate, bhikkhus, do not delay lest you regret it later. This is our instruction to you."

MN 8; MN 152

:namaste:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah

User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 3579
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby clw_uk » Sun Feb 01, 2009 2:47 pm

"Both formerly and now, monks, I declare only stress and the cessation of stress. 14 And if others insult, abuse, taunt, bother, & harass the Tathagata for that, he feels no hatred, no resentment, no dissatisfaction of heart because of that. And if others honor, respect, revere, & venerate the Tathagata for that, he feels no joy, no happiness, no elation of heart because of that. And if others honor, respect, revere, & venerate the Tathagata for that, he thinks, 'They do me such service at this that has already been comprehended.' 15

"Therefore, monks, if others insult, abuse, taunt, bother, & harass you as well, you should feel no hatred, no resentment, no dissatisfaction of heart because of that. And if others honor, respect, revere, & venerate you as well, you should feel no joy, no gladness, no elation of heart because of that. And if others honor, respect, revere, & venerate you, you should think, 'They do us 16 such service at this that has already been comprehended.'

"Therefore, monks, whatever isn't yours: Let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term welfare & happiness. And what isn't yours? Form (body) isn't yours: Let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term welfare & happiness. Feeling isn't yours... Perception... Thought fabrications... Consciousness isn't yours: Let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term welfare & happiness.

"What do you think, monks: If a person were to gather or burn or do as he likes with the grass, twigs, branches & leaves here in Jeta's Grove, would the thought occur to you, 'It's us that this person is gathering, burning, or doing with as he likes'?"

"No, lord. Why is that? Because those things are not our self, nor do they belong to our self."

"Even so, monks, whatever isn't yours: Let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term welfare & happiness. And what isn't yours? Form isn't yours... Feeling isn't yours... Perception... Thought fabrications... Consciousness isn't yours: Let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term welfare & happiness.]



:namaste:
“The Great Way is not difficult for those who have no preferences. When love and hate are both absent, everything becomes clear and undisguised." Verses on the Faith Mind, Sengcan

User avatar
David N. Snyder
Site Admin
Posts: 8292
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun Feb 01, 2009 3:54 pm

Do not believe in something because it is reported. Do not believe in something because it has been practiced by generations or becomes a tradition or part of a culture. Do not believe in something because a scripture says it is so. Do not believe in something believing a god has inspired it. Do not believe in something a teacher tells you to. Do not believe in something because the authorities say it is so. Do not believe in hearsay, rumor, speculative opinion, public opinion, or mere acceptance to logic and inference alone. Help yourself, accept as completely true only that which you test for yourself and know to be good for yourself and others.”

Kalama Sutta, Anguttara Nikaya 3.65

(paraphrased, not the actual word-by-word quote, but meaning is the same)

Full text:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html (Thanissaro)

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .soma.html (Soma)

On another note, the exact translations of the above and Pali Text Society include "not to go by specious reasoning or logic . . ." which simply means not to go by logic or inference alone. It does not mean that logic is not used in examining the Buddha's teachings, just not by superficial logic or logic alone.

User avatar
Prasadachitta
Posts: 974
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 6:52 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: San Francisco (The Mission) Ca USA
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Prasadachitta » Sun Feb 01, 2009 4:54 pm

Dhammapada

Pairs
Verse one and two

"Experiences are preceded by psyche, led by psyche, and produced by psyche. If one speaks or acts with an impure psyche, suffering follows even as the cart-wheel follows the hoof of the ox."

"Experiences are preceded by psyche, led by psyche, and produced by psyche. If one speaks or acts with a pure psyche, happiness follows like a shadow that never departs."


Metta

Gabriel
"Beautifully taught is the Lord's Dhamma, immediately apparent, timeless, of the nature of a personal invitation, progressive, to be attained by the wise, each for himself." Anguttara Nikaya V.332

User avatar
genkaku
Posts: 416
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 11:14 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Northampton, Mass. U.S.A.
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby genkaku » Sun Feb 01, 2009 5:24 pm

"It is not what others do and do not do that is my concern. It is what I do and do not do -- that is my concern."

User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
Posts: 14813
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby retrofuturist » Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:46 pm

Cool Gabriel... that's my 2nd favourite. :thumbsup:

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

Individual
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Individual » Sun Feb 01, 2009 11:34 pm

Winny wrote:What's your favorite Buddha's quote? [Share here] :thanks: :namaste:

It's very hard to say. I haven't read enough suttas to really have much to choose from too. But I honestly can say that no word of the Buddha was more well-spoken than his first words after his enlightenment and his last words before death.

His first words, upon attaining enlightenment, the Buddha's "Song of Victory" from the Dhammapada:
O house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again. For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered. My mind has reached the Unconditioned; I have attained the destruction of craving.

And his last words, before attaining parinibbana, in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta:
Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!

With that said, the Buddha also had a good sense of humor and I was also a bit amused when he said to Ananda in the Maha-Parinibbana sutta (paraphrase), "If you had asked me to live on for another 20 years, the first two times I might have said no, but the third time you asked, I would have said yes."

Although it can be a bit obscured by the repetitive and simple style of Indian literature, Gautama had a great wit and sense of humor, even on matters as serious as his own death. :D
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra

User avatar
kowtaaia
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 6:54 pm

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby kowtaaia » Mon Feb 02, 2009 4:10 am

Staying at Savatthi. "Monks, suppose there were four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — standing in the four directions, and a man were to come along saying, 'I will catch & bring down the arrows let fly by these four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they have fallen to the ground.' What do you think? Would that be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed?"

"Even if he were to catch & bring down the arrows let fly by one archer — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they fell to the ground, lord, that would be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed, to say nothing of four such archers."

"Faster than the speed of that man, monks, is the speed of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, is the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, faster than the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon, the force of one's life span comes to an end. Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will live heedfully.' That's how you should train yourselves."


Dhanuggaha Sutta
The Archer
Where thought arises and where it dissolves,
There you should abide, O my son.



http://www.buddhistlounge.com/index.htm

Individual
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Individual » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:05 am

kowtaaia wrote:Staying at Savatthi. "Monks, suppose there were four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — standing in the four directions, and a man were to come along saying, 'I will catch & bring down the arrows let fly by these four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they have fallen to the ground.' What do you think? Would that be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed?"

"Even if he were to catch & bring down the arrows let fly by one archer — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they fell to the ground, lord, that would be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed, to say nothing of four such archers."

"Faster than the speed of that man, monks, is the speed of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, is the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, faster than the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon, the force of one's life span comes to an end. Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will live heedfully.' That's how you should train yourselves."


Dhanuggaha Sutta
The Archer

I wish I could move that quickly.
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra

teacup_bo
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2009 1:24 am

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby teacup_bo » Tue Feb 03, 2009 1:03 pm

kowtaaia wrote:Staying at Savatthi. "Monks, suppose there were four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — standing in the four directions, and a man were to come along saying, 'I will catch & bring down the arrows let fly by these four strong archers — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they have fallen to the ground.' What do you think? Would that be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed?"

"Even if he were to catch & bring down the arrows let fly by one archer — well-trained, practiced, & drilled — before they fell to the ground, lord, that would be enough to call him a swift man, endowed with the foremost speed, to say nothing of four such archers."

"Faster than the speed of that man, monks, is the speed of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, is the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon. Faster than the speed of that man, faster than the speed of the sun & moon, faster than the speed of the devas who rush ahead of the sun & moon, the force of one's life span comes to an end. Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will live heedfully.' That's how you should train yourselves."


Dhanuggaha Sutta
The Archer


Thankyou

User avatar
piotr
Posts: 371
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:33 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Khettadesa

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby piotr » Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:59 pm

Hi,

I like two short suttas from The Fives of Aṅguttara-nikāya about benefits of walking (sounds like protojogging to me :smile: ) and eating porridge. :thumbsup:

Image
Bhagavaṃmūlakā no, bhante, dhammā...

User avatar
Dhammanando
Posts: 1425
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:44 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 6
Location: Wat Pa Mieng Khun Pang, Chiang Mai

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Dhammanando » Tue Feb 03, 2009 9:22 pm

Hi Piotr,

piotr wrote:I like two short suttas from The Fives of Aṅguttara-nikāya about benefits of walking (sounds like protojogging to me :smile: ) and eating porridge.


When you've finished your porridge, don't forget the Dantakaṭṭha Sutta's teaching on the five dangers of not using a toothbrush (AN. iii. 250).

Best wishes,
Dhammanando Bhikkhu
    ...and this thought arose in the mind of the Blessed One:
    “Who lives without reverence lives miserably.”
    Uruvela Sutta, A.ii.20

    It were endless to dispute upon everything that is disputable.
    — William Penn Some Fruits of Solitude,

User avatar
piotr
Posts: 371
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 4:33 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Khettadesa

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby piotr » Tue Feb 03, 2009 9:44 pm

Image
Bhagavaṃmūlakā no, bhante, dhammā...

User avatar
Annapurna
Posts: 2639
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 8:04 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Germany
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Annapurna » Wed Feb 04, 2009 4:38 pm

Always what I read at the moment.

82

Like a deep lake,
clear, unruffled, & calm:
so the wise become clear,
calm,
on hearing words of the Dhamma.
http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/

User avatar
puthujjana
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 8:13 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Contact:

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby puthujjana » Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:11 pm

"But when I am traveling along a road and see no one in front or behind me, at that time I have my ease, even when urinating & defecating." ;)

- AN 6.42
Last edited by puthujjana on Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Once you understand anatta, then the burden of life is gone. You’ll be at peace with the world. When we see beyond self, we no longer cling to happiness and we can truly be happy."
- Ajahn Chah

User avatar
Danny
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:55 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 6

Re: What's your favorite Buddha's quote?

Postby Danny » Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:18 pm

Dhammapada VIII.

103. Though one may conquer a thousand times a thousand men in battle, yet he indeed is the noblest victor who conquers himself.


I still got alot of reading to do, but this is one of my favorites so far and up to now.


Return to “General Theravāda discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Coyote and 6 guests