What is your favorite sutta and why ?

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metta28
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What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby metta28 » Tue Jul 19, 2011 12:22 pm

Extra Question: What was the first sutta you read and how well did you understand it ?

robertkleckley
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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby robertkleckley » Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:31 pm

MN 95 Canki Sutta (steps toward the realization of truth)

This sutta outlines a very profound system for accomplishing anything! Not only relevant to searching for the truth/enlightenment but can be used in daily life with an extremely high rate of success. When I read this sutta it resonated very strongly with me because It is the same system I have used to accomplish goals all of my life, And it works! The problem is, when a normal goal in life is reached with this method nothing is behind it(hollow), leaving a feeling of dissatisfaction, it seems one has put so much effort into something only to gain nothing (kind of helpful in a way). This sutta was the turning point for me in my Buddhist study and faith, elevating my commitment to the practice. The sutta also shows the amount of reason and logic the Buddha expected people to use in searching for a religion/teacher/guidance, if someone actively asks followers to 'investigate the teachings' it is a sure sign of confidence in the strength of the teachings.

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Majjhima Patipada » Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:26 am

My favorite would be any from the Atthakavagga (fourth chapter of the Sutta Nipata), since most would suggest that having a favorite can easily unfold into attachment to views. These and similar suttas help me understand my own preferences, biases, and predispositions, and they inspire me to challenge them.

My first was the Akkosa Sutta (Samyutta NIkaya 7.2), which suggests to "turn the other cheek" when insulted. This teaching resonated deeply with me, and I have since taken its advice to heart.

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:59 am

For me it's the Anapanasati Sutta because it tells you everything you need to know about practice. I just wish I understood it. :rofl:

spiny

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby santa100 » Thu Jul 21, 2011 12:51 pm

Hi Spiny, check out Bhikkhu Bodhi's wonderful lecture on the Anapanasati Sutta at the below link. It helped me a lot..

http://bodhimonastery.net/bm/about-budd ... ml?start=5

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby buddhadhamma » Sat Feb 25, 2012 1:38 am

Kalama Sutta
- Reaffirms my faith in Lord Buddha's teachings and helps me direct my attention to reality as perceived, each time I go through it.

The Lord Buddha said in the “Kå¬åma Sutta”:

Do not believe in what you have heard; do not believe in
traditions because they have been handed down for many
generations; do not believe in anything because it is
rumoured and spoken by many; do not believe merely
because a written statement of some old sage is produced;
do not believe in conjectures; do not believe in that as
truth to which you have become attached from habit; do
not believe merely the authority of your teachers and
elders. After observation and analysis, when it agrees
with reason and is conducive to the good and gain of one
and all, then accept it and live up to it.
Pray do not, therefore, believe me when I come to the
philosophical issues until and unless you are convinced of
what I say, either as a sequel to proper reasoning or by means
of a practical approach.
To abstain from evil,
To do good,
To purify the mind,
These are the teachings of all the Buddhas.

Dhammapada, verse 183
This extract taken from the Dhammapada gives in brief the essence of Buddhism. It sounds simple, but is so difficult to practise. One cannot be a true Buddhist unless one puts the doctrine of the Buddha into practice. The Buddha said: You, to whom the truths I have perceived have been made known by me, make them truly your own, practise them,meditate upon them, spread them abroad: in order that the pure religion may last long and be perpetuated for the good and the gain and the well-being of gods and men.

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby happylotus1 » Sat Feb 25, 2012 2:18 pm

One of my favorite suttas is Sigalovada Sutta. It feel me laugh while reading the sutta. very joyful. :quote:
A householder or householder's son, hearing the Dhamma, gains conviction in the Tathāgata and reflects: 'Household life is confining, a dusty path. The life gone forth is like the open air. It is not easy living at home to practice the holy life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Cal » Sat Feb 25, 2012 2:55 pm

First I read was the Kakacupama Sutta, specifically looking for the similie of the saw. It continues to inspire me to practice, such a long way to go...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.021x.than.html

Current "favourite" is the Kataññu Sutta, gratitude to parents. As a carer for my father, it motivates me each and every day...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an02/an02.031.than.html

Best wishes
Cal
Right Speech: It is spoken at the right time. It is spoken in truth. It is spoken affectionately. It is spoken beneficially. It is spoken with a mind of good-will. [AN 5.198]

Personally, I seem to gain the most insight when I am under the most pressure, when life is at its most unpleasant. There is something in me on those occasions which feels that there is nothing left but to be aware of 'this'. Ajahn Sumedho - Don't Take Your Life Personally, p288

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Gotami Sutta: To Gotami

Postby Prasadachitta » Sat Feb 25, 2012 4:15 pm

This Sutta shows that the Buddha was supremely confident in the potential of consistent awareness to separate what conduces to understanding the truth and what does not. As long as we have a sense of how free the Buddha was while exploring and testing what lends to that kind of freedom and what blocks it. I think its why the Buddhas last words were "I exhort you, monks: All fabrications are subject to decay. Bring about completion by being heedful." Which means to me that all my ideas about practice much less all the rest of my impressions are nothing when compared to the activity of being cautiously alert with the desire to be unlimited.

I dont remember the first Sutta I read but I do remember reading this in a introduction to Buddhism on BuddhaNet.Net...
When this is, that is.

From the arising of this comes the arising of that.

When this isn't, that isn't.

From the cessation of this comes the cessation of that.


And while I can not say I fully understood, I did have the sense of being exposed to a teaching that led onwards like an invitation to let go of all limitations. I was excited that a religious teacher would describe a seemingly simple and observable principle and put it at the core of his teaching.

Metta

Prasadachitta




Gotami Sutta: To Gotami
I have heard that at one time the Blessed One was staying at Vesali, in the Peaked Roof Hall in the Great Forest.

Then Mahapajapati Gotami went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, stood to one side. As she was standing there she said to him: "It would be good, lord, if the Blessed One would teach me the Dhamma in brief such that, having heard the Dhamma from the Blessed One, I might dwell alone, secluded, heedful, ardent, & resolute."

"Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to contentment; to entanglement, not to seclusion; to laziness, not to aroused persistence; to being burdensome, not to being unburdensome': You may categorically hold, 'This is not the Dhamma, this is not the Vinaya, this is not the Teacher's instruction.'

"As for the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to dispassion, not to passion; to being unfettered, not to being fettered; to shedding, not to accumulating; to modesty, not to self-aggrandizement; to contentment, not to discontent; to seclusion, not to entanglement; to aroused persistence, not to laziness; to being unburdensome, not to being burdensome': You may categorically hold, 'This is the Dhamma, this is the Vinaya, this is the Teacher's instruction.'"

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, Mahapajapati Gotami delighted at his words.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an08/an08.053.than.html
Last edited by Prasadachitta on Sat Feb 25, 2012 9:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"Beautifully taught is the Lord's Dhamma, immediately apparent, timeless, of the nature of a personal invitation, progressive, to be attained by the wise, each for himself." Anguttara Nikaya V.332

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Feb 25, 2012 4:20 pm

Hi Buddhadhamma
who translated the Kalama sutta you use? it seams added onto.

buddhadhamma wrote:Kalama Sutta
- Reaffirms my faith in Lord Buddha's teachings and helps me direct my attention to reality as perceived, each time I go through it.

The Lord Buddha said in the “Kå¬åma Sutta”:

Do not believe in what you have heard; do not believe in
traditions because they have been handed down for many
generations; do not believe in anything because it is
rumoured and spoken by many; do not believe merely
because a written statement of some old sage is produced;
do not believe in conjectures; do not believe in that as
truth to which you have become attached from habit; do
not believe merely the authority of your teachers and
elders. After observation and analysis, when it agrees
with reason and is conducive to the good and gain of one
and all, then accept it and live up to it.
Pray do not, therefore, believe me when I come to the
philosophical issues until and unless you are convinced of
what I say, either as a sequel to proper reasoning or by means
of a practical approach.
To abstain from evil,
To do good,
To purify the mind,
These are the teachings of all the Buddhas.

Dhammapada, verse 183
This extract taken from the Dhammapada gives in brief the essence of Buddhism. It sounds simple, but is so difficult to practise. One cannot be a true Buddhist unless one puts the doctrine of the Buddha into practice. The Buddha said: You, to whom the truths I have perceived have been made known by me, make them truly your own, practise them,meditate upon them, spread them abroad: in order that the pure religion may last long and be perpetuated for the good and the gain and the well-being of gods and men.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sat Feb 25, 2012 6:06 pm

The Nandana Sutta is pretty great:

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery.
Then Mara the Evil One went to the Blessed One and recited this verse in his presence:

Those with children delight because of their children.
Those with cattle delight because of their cows.
A person's delight comes from acquisitions,
since a person with no acquisitions doesn't delight.

[The Buddha responded:]
Those with children grieve because of their children.
Those with cattle grieve because of their cows.
A person's grief comes from acquisitions,
since a person with no acquisitions doesn't grieve.

Then of course the Metta Sutta:
This is what should be done By one who is skilled in goodness, And who knows the path of peace:
Let them be able and upright,
Straightforward and gentle in speech,
Humble and not conceited,
Contented and easily satisfied,
Unburdened with duties and frugal in their ways.
Peaceful and calm and wise and skillful,
Not proud or demanding in nature.
Let them not do the slightest thing
That the wise would later reprove.
Wishing: In gladness and in safety,
May all beings be at ease.
Whatever living beings there may be;
Whether they are weak or strong, omitting none,
The great or the mighty, medium, short or small,
The seen and the unseen,
Those living near and far away,
Those born and to-be-born —
May all beings be at ease!

Let none deceive another,
Or despise any being in any state.
Let none through anger or ill-will
Wish harm upon another.
Even as a mother protects with her life
Her child, her only child,
So with a boundless heart
Should one cherish all living beings;
Radiating kindness over the entire world:
Spreading upwards to the skies,
And downwards to the depths;
Outwards and unbounded,
Freed from hatred and ill-will.
Whether standing or walking, seated or lying down
Free from drowsiness,
One should sustain this recollection.
This is said to be the sublime abiding.
By not holding to fixed views,
The pure-hearted one, having clarity of vision,
Being freed from all sense desires,
Is not born again into this world.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Feb 25, 2012 10:43 pm

Too many good ones to narrow it down to one. Another good questions is:

Which is your favorite Nikaya?

For me, it is the Anguttara Nikaya.

Here are just a few good ones of many in the Anguttara Nikaya:

http://www.thedhamma.com/anguttaranikaya.htm

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby rowboat » Sun Feb 26, 2012 12:36 am

The Sammaditthi Sutta: The Discourse on Right View - MN:9 has been my big focus for a while.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .ntbb.html
and here: http://bodhimonastery.org/a-systematic- ... ikaya.html
(MN: 9 begins down page at VII. The Cultivation of Wisdom)

Otherwise, lately I've had a strong appreciation for the suttas of the Sutta-Nipata, and I'm privately fond of wondering about the strange Brahma-nimantanika Sutta: The Brahma Invitation MN-49 :o
Rain soddens what is covered up,
It does not sodden what is open.
Therefore uncover what is covered
That the rain will not sodden it.
Ud 5.5

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby ignobleone » Sun Feb 26, 2012 4:38 am

My favorite is Potthapada Sutta (DN 9) because I don't know what jhana is all about until I've read the sutta.

robertkleckley wrote:MN 95 Canki Sutta (steps toward the realization of truth)

Thank you for bringing up the sutta.

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby buddhadhamma » Sun Feb 26, 2012 3:48 pm

Cittasanto wrote:Hi Buddhadhamma
who translated the Kalama sutta you use? it seams added onto.


Hi Cittasanto

The translation is from "What Buddhism Is?" By Sayagyi U Ba Khin - http://www.internationalmeditationcentr ... aTexts.pdf

Metta

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:15 pm

buddhadhamma wrote:
Cittasanto wrote:Hi Buddhadhamma
who translated the Kalama sutta you use? it seams added onto.


Hi Cittasanto

The translation is from "What Buddhism Is?" By Sayagyi U Ba Khin - http://www.internationalmeditationcentr ... aTexts.pdf

Metta

Thanks
Which page?
I will just point you to access to insight any any of the translations there for another rendering.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby buddhadhamma » Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:18 pm

Cittasanto wrote:
buddhadhamma wrote:
Cittasanto wrote:Hi Buddhadhamma
who translated the Kalama sutta you use? it seams added onto.


Hi Cittasanto

The translation is from "What Buddhism Is?" By Sayagyi U Ba Khin - http://www.internationalmeditationcentr ... aTexts.pdf

Metta

Thanks
Which page?
I will just point you to access to insight any any of the translations there for another rendering.


Page No. 2 - I am sorry for not specifying it earlier.

Metta

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:11 pm

Hmm, the footnote says it's from the PTS translation:
1 Gradual Sayings, I, pp. 171f. References, unless otherwise specified, are
to the publications of the Pali Text Society.

Does anyone have quick access to check? I thought it sounded like one of the dodgy translations...

In any case, Sayagyi U Ba Khin wouldn't be using that particular translation himself....

Here's some alternatives:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .soma.html
10. "Come, Kalamas. Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing; nor upon tradition; nor upon rumor; nor upon what is in a scripture; nor upon surmise; nor upon an axiom; nor upon specious reasoning; nor upon a bias toward a notion that has been pondered over; nor upon another's seeming ability; nor upon the consideration, 'The monk is our teacher.' Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are good; these things are not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to benefit and happiness,' enter on and abide in them.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"Now, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative is our teacher.' When you know for yourselves that, 'These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to welfare & to happiness' — then you should enter & remain in them.

The last sentence seems particularly different from the quoted one:
Do not believe in what you have heard; do not believe in
traditions because they have been handed down for many
generations; do not believe in anything because it is
rumoured and spoken by many; do not believe merely
because a written statement of some old sage is produced;
do not believe in conjectures; do not believe in that as
truth to which you have become attached from habit; do
not believe merely the authority of your teachers and
elders. After observation and analysis, when it agrees
with reason and is conducive to the good and gain of one
and all, then accept it and live up to it.

:anjali:
Mike

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:17 am

Hi buddhadhamma
Thanks, I see mike has gotten the info I was looking for, So Thanks Mike also! I will be sending a PM to a friend soon to grab the info for me.
That translation is a dodgy one, it alters the meaning quite drasticly, the sutta is all about ethics and how to act & decide what is moral to do, not philosophy, or reasoning.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: What is your favorite sutta and why ?

Postby buddhadhamma » Mon Feb 27, 2012 5:48 pm

Greetings Cittasanto

I believe - Until we attain full Enlightenment, our understanding of Dhamma would vary (individually) and therefore I respect each and everyone's opinion, also your disapproval. I, myself would not be able to fully approve of all the various translations available today - having said that I would surely refrain from using strong words such as "dodgy" to express my opinion for any Earnest Dhamma work done (based on wholesome intentions) by any Pali Scholar or Revered Dhamma Teacher.

I am no Pali Scholar and therefore would not be able to validate the translation, however your choice of words to express disapproval did confuse me -
Cittasanto wrote:Hi buddhadhamma
That translation is a dodgy one, it alters the meaning quite drasticly, the sutta is all about ethics and how to act & decide what is moral to do, not philosophy, or reasoning .


phi·los·o·phy (f-ls-f)
n. pl. phi·los·o·phies
1. Love and pursuit of wisdom by intellectual means and moral self-discipline.
2. Investigation of the nature, causes, or principles of reality, knowledge, or values, based on logical reasoning rather than empirical methods.
3. A system of thought based on or involving such inquiry: the philosophy of Hume.
4. The critical analysis of fundamental assumptions or beliefs.
5. The disciplines presented in university curriculums of science and the liberal arts, except medicine, law, and theology.
6. The discipline comprising logic, ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and epistemology.
7. A set of ideas or beliefs relating to a particular field or activity; an underlying theory: an original philosophy of advertising.
8. A system of values by which one lives: has an unusual philosophy of life.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/philosophy

reasoning [ˈriːzənɪŋ]
n
1. the act or process of drawing conclusions from facts, evidence, etc.
2. the arguments, proofs, etc., so adduced

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/reasoning

Metta


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