Theravada Buddhist Education

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom
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Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:30 pm

Inspired by a video on the Bhikkhuni Restoration thread here
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=1482&start=20

So what is and should be a Theravada Education system?
I know I have tried to find a online course specifically tayloured to Theravada Buddhism, with little success, but what would be a theravada Course be like, instead of the Basic courses which come mainly from Mahayana as far as I can tell.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:23 pm

A great video, talk by Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi. He raises many good points. I'll have to go through it again and pull some great quotes by him. For now, I can say that he made excellent references to promoting ideas that might be called 'Modern Theravada.'

The part about the nuns' education, specifically is not until the end. It is more about education in general for Buddhist monastics and other teachers.

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Jun 06, 2009 5:22 pm

TheDhamma wrote:A great video, talk by Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi. He raises many good points. I'll have to go through it again and pull some great quotes by him. For now, I can say that he made excellent references to promoting ideas that might be called 'Modern Theravada.'

The part about the nuns' education, specifically is not until the end. It is more about education in general for Buddhist monastics and other teachers.


Hi The Dhamma

I think there needs to be a systematic study program(s) which is from the theravada perspective, which moves forward from the basic to the most Advanced, from the top of my head a sort of basic layout of the levels, I know there are courses but these dont seam to be for a global audiance as they tend to require moving to a buddhist country from our own.
Basics Lay Education, - GCSE/A-Levels Level 1/2/3
Standard Lay Education - Certificate/Intermediate Level 4/5
Devoted Lay Education, Novice Education - Honors Level 6
Lay Teacher Education, Monastic Education - Masters Level 7
Monastic Teacher Education - Doctorate Level 8
Have tried to show where I think the two sets would sort of meet something like in UK Education,
http://www.qca.org.uk/libraryAssets/med ... qf-web.pdf

Edit to make it easier to see the comparison
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby gavesako » Sat Jun 06, 2009 8:31 pm

In fact Bhikkhu Bodhi has, many years ago, suggested such a graduated system of monastic education to be applied in the Western monasteries. However, it has never taken root there, although there have been occasional attempts at systematic study, mainly of the Vinaya and sometimes also Sutta classes. But somehow this kind of knowledge is not stressed in the Ajahn Chah tradition. I hope that after listening to BB's talk, though, some people will have a change of mind about this.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby jcsuperstar » Sat Jun 06, 2009 8:59 pm

i fear making education requirements for monastics.

though some teach, their "job" isnt to teach it's to find liberation, and although the buddha laid down a path, i dont think trying to grade that path like we do students in western schools will make the path more accessable, apealing, or easier to follow.
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby appicchato » Sat Jun 06, 2009 9:05 pm

jcsuperstar wrote:...their "job" isnt to teach it's to find liberation...


:thumbsup:

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Jun 06, 2009 9:28 pm

gavesako wrote:In fact Bhikkhu Bodhi has, many years ago, suggested such a graduated system of monastic education to be applied in the Western monasteries. However, it has never taken root there, although there have been occasional attempts at systematic study, mainly of the Vinaya and sometimes also Sutta classes. But somehow this kind of knowledge is not stressed in the Ajahn Chah tradition. I hope that after listening to BB's talk, though, some people will have a change of mind about this.


I think both are useful, different people and all that, different times different needs.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Jun 06, 2009 9:39 pm

jcsuperstar wrote:i fear making education requirements for monastics.

though some teach, their "job" isnt to teach it's to find liberation, and although the buddha laid down a path, i dont think trying to grade that path like we do students in western schools will make the path more accessable, apealing, or easier to follow.


where would you read requirements in my OP? certainly each level would have different minimum requirements, but for a monastic I would imagine it would depend on the person whether or not the course(s) are taken!

and it is my understanding it is not a monk who is in trainings job but a monk who is trained.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Hoo » Sat Jun 06, 2009 11:43 pm

JMHO, but a basic introduction is sorely needed. I just came down the path of looking for standardized, or even agreed, intro to Buddhism materials. There is a zoo of stuff, much of which explains very little. The advice is everywhere to postpone (or select) your tradition of choice, choose a teacher with due care, etc., yet there is no guideline for doing that. And people brand new to Buddhism lack the knowledge to make such decisions, the nearest teacher of any kind may be 100 miles away, yada yada yada. There is a very good case to be made for some standardized materials that are accessable everywhere. Maybe the internet will prove to be the university without teachers or walls for such an attempt.

However, graduated instruction can also become a slippery slope leading to the ills of modern "religious vocations" and hierarchies. Who will agree on the standards, who will enforce them. What kind of robins-and-sparrows hierarchies will emerge or be necessary to maintain the system, etc?

My guess is that it has been tried and failed somewhere in the last 2500 years. But now we have the internet.

Of course, with my preference for the Forrest tradition, I won't see whatever is agreed upon and published :meditate:

Steve

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby jcsuperstar » Sun Jun 07, 2009 5:35 am

well there are books for those starting out on the path, like bodhi's In the Buddha's Words and Walpola Rahula's what the buddha taught

also in our own little study group here on dhammawheel we discussed the budda's instructions for finding a teacher.

the forest tradition IMO couldnt have a structured training system as it's pretty much an individual's world, and one focuses on what is best for them to move along the path, which type of meditation works for them, which set of discourses, how much study vs practice etc, and from what i've read in the suttas this is how the buddha taught; "to each by what they need".
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby gavesako » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:04 am

Here are some general comments:

Ajahn Jayasaro - Buddhist Education

What is the purpose of Buddhist education?


http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p ... 128902C6C0
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby appicchato » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:39 am

jcsuperstar wrote:...it's pretty much an individual's world, and one focuses on what is best for them to move along the path, which type of meditation works for them, which set of discourses, how much study vs practice etc, and from what i've read in the suttas this is how the buddha taught; "to each by what they need".


:thumbsup:

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:57 am

appicchato wrote:
jcsuperstar wrote:...it's pretty much an individual's world, and one focuses on what is best for them to move along the path, which type of meditation works for them, which set of discourses, how much study vs practice etc, and from what i've read in the suttas this is how the buddha taught; "to each by what they need".


:thumbsup:


I Agree,
I had a thought before about this thread.

maybe there would be away for a course to be made that would be able to be done solo, ie not for credit or diploma, which would be helpful for those wishing to do self study out of interest in the area, wanting to find a new method to aid in difficulties in the practice (when they don't have a regulare teacher if at all), and for credit /diploma etc?
but that may be to difficult in some areas for a standard content, maybe a two level, one for the course and another for suplimentry part for the course which is also a practice aid?
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:01 am

just found this
unable to upload it so the full text is quoted so anyone can cut and paste it for review



PROGRAM OF BUDDHIST STUDIES
Introduction
The objectives of this program are threefold:

(1) To ensure that all monks and nuns acquire a broad overview of the Buddhist religion, including an outline of its principal schools and historical development.

(2) To provide them with an intensive course of instruction in the fundamental principles of the Theravàda tradition, based primarily on the discourses of the Buddha.

(3) To indicate the areas of advanced study that may be pursued by those wio wish to obtain a wide scholarly understanding of the Theravàda tradition.

The program is organized into seven broad areas. A given area may have several subdivisions, which are determined by level. Within each area and subdivision a list of suggested readings is offered. For a more extensive bibliography of works on the Pali Canon and other scholarly writings pertaining to the Theravàda tradition, the student is referred to Russell Webb, Analysis of the Pali Canon (BPS Wheel No. 217/220), 2nd BPS edition 1991 which also provides a helpful overview of the entire Canon.

The core of the program is the course in Sutta Study: i) instructional aspect. Because the recommended readings for this area are too numerous to incorporate within the outline of the program, I have placed them in an appendix to the outline.

Unless alternative translations are mentioned, it should be understood that all translations of canonical works are those of the Pali Text Society. Often these are inadequate, but at present in many cases better alternatives do not exist.
I have not made any suggestions concerning how theme courses are to be organized (whether as formal courses of instruction or as private stiudy) or even the duration of each course. Such decisions, it seems, would require further deliberation.


Prepared by Ven. Bbikkhu Bodhi in consultatio n with Ven. Nyanaponika Mahàthera Kandy- Sri Lanka August 1993




AREA I : BUDDHIST SCHOOLS

A. Basic

John Snelling, The Buddhist Handbook
Peter Harvey, Introduction to Buddhism

I have not read these books, but have heard them recommended as elementary surveys.

B. Advanced

A.K. Warder, Indian Buddhism
Edward Conze, Buddhist Thought in India
Paul Williams, Mahayana Buddhism

The first two works give a comprehensive survey of the development of Buddhism in India. Warder covers all aspects: philosophical, literary, social, organizational. Conze emphasizes the philosophical. I include Williams since I think Theravada monastics should also have some acquaintance with the Mahayana schools.


AREA II : FUNDAMENTAL THERAVADA TEACHINGS

Walpola Rahula, What the Buddha Taught
Piyadassi Thera, The Buddha’s Ancient Path
Nyanatiloka Thera, Word of the Buddha
Bhikkhu Bodhi, The Buddha’s Teaching As It Is (audio-cassettes)

The first two works are very basic intros to the Dhamma, both centering around the Four Noble Truths; the book by Ven. Piyadassi also includes an elaborate explanation of the Eightfold Path. Word of the Buddha is an excellent little anthology of excerpts from the Suttas, organized around the Four Noble Truths. The Bodhi work is a series of 10 cassettes covering the essential principles of the Dhamma (copies should be available at Amaravati).


AREA III : PALI LANGUAGE


A.K. Warder, Introduction to Pali

The New Pali Course is suggested because I do not know of another good Pali primer that can still be found (perhaps Narada's Elementary Pali Course or Ven. Balangoda ânanda Maitreya’s primer?). Warder is the standard work, though this may be tough for those who do not pick up languages easily. This is an area where students will have to experiment with what is available. (Another possibility is Rune Johansson,.Pali Buddhist Texts.)








AREA IV : SUTTA STUDY

A. Basic Level

1. Instructional: see Appendix

2. For inspiration & edification

The Dhammapada
The Mahàparinibbàõa Sutta (DN16 in Walshe, Thus Have I Heard; BPS - Last Days of the Buddha)

AREA IV : (CONTINUED)

B. Intermediate Level

1. Instructional: see Appendix

2. For inspiration & edification

The Udàna (BPS edition)
The Itivuttaka (BPS edition)
Sutta Nipàta (PTS edition, Norman’s translation., very accurate
with numerous notes)
Nyanatiloka Thera, The Buddha’s Path to Deliverance

The last-named work contains many Sutta passages dealing with the various subjects of meditation in the spheres of both samatha and vipassanà.

C. Advanced Level

1. Instructional: see Appendix

2. For inspiration & edification:

Theragàtha, Therãgàtha

The PTS edition, K.E. Norman's translation (Elder’s Verses, I & II), are very accurate with numerous valuable notes.


AREA V : VINAYA STUDY

A. Basic Level

The Patimokkha, with explanations

Ajahn Jeff Thanissaro, Buddhist Monastic Code. (A methodical explanation of the rules of the Patimokkha — very thorough and careful.)

B. Intermediate Level

The Book of Discipline (Vinaya Piñaka ), vols. 1-5

The only complete translation is that of I.B. Horner, which, while it must be admired for its pioneering efforts, contains numerous errors. Perhaps too: Entrance to the Vinaya, Part 2.




C. Advanced Level

Samantapàsàdika (Comy. to Vinaya Piñaka )

Kaïkhavitaranã (Comy. to Patimokkha rules only)

Vinaya Saïgaha (medieval Sinhalese work, in Pali, giving decisions on questions not resolved in the Vinaya Piñaka itself, according to the tradition of the Acariyas)

These works are available only in Pali and would have to be read in that language.

add: Parivàra (Vinaya Piñaka , vol. 69 in Horner’s translation)
perhaps too: Entrance to the Vinaya, Part 3.



AREA VI : ABHIDHAMMA STUDY

A. Basic Level

Bhikkhu Bodhi, ed. A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma (BPS)
Nyanaponika Thera, Abhidhamma Studies (BPS)

The former is the new version of the old manual, offering a translation of the Abhidhammattha Sangaha (as well as the Pali text) with a detailed explanatory guide. The latter is a series of essays based on the Dhammasaïganã VI. The first two essays discuss the basic principles of the Abhidhamma; the remaining essays should be read in conjunction with a study of Dhamma itself.

B. Intermediate Level

Nyanatiloka Thera, Guide through the Abhidhamna Piñaka (BPS)
Dhammasaïganã & Aññhasàlinã : the first book of the Abhidhamma Piñaka and its commentary.
Available in transl.from PTS as:
Buddhist Psychological Ethics (trans. C.A.F. Rhys Davids)
The Expositor (2 vols.) (trans. Shwe Zan Aung)
Nyanaponika Thera Abhidhamma Studies, chaps. III-V

C. Advanced Level

Vibhaïga & Sammohavinodanã: second book of Abhidhamma.Piñaka and its Commentary.
PTS translations:
The Book of Analysis (trans. U Thittila)
The Dispeller of Delusion (2-vols.;trans. ¥àõamoli)

Patthana: The analytical exposition of conditions may be enough for an exposure to the method. Text of the Paññhàna is translated (in part) by U Nàrada, PTS ed. published as Conditional Relations. For clarification of the system, the following should be consulted:
U Nàrada, Guide to Conditional Relations, Part I (PTS)
Ledi Sayadaw, The Buddhist Philosophy of Relations
(BPS Wheel No. 331/333)




AREA VII : THE VISUDDHIMAGGA

Using the translation by Bhikkhu ¥àõamoli The Path of Purification (BPS).

A. Level i)

Chapters 1-5: Virtue; the Dhutaïgas; Taking up a meditation subject; the Kasinas

B. Level ii)

Chapters 6-13: The other meditation subjects pertaining to samàdhi; the Direct Knowledges

C. Level iii) Chapters 14-17: The Soil of Understanding - Aggregates, Sense Bases & Elements, the Four Noble Truths; Dependent Origination

D. Level iv)

Chapters 18-23: The Insight Knowledges; the Paths and Fruits; Fruition Attainment and the Attainment of Cessation

Perhaps a concise version of the Visuddhimagga course could be prepared for those who do not wish to study the work in as much detail as the four-level course would entail.

The concise course would comprise: Chapts. 1, 3 &4; Chapt. 8, the section on ânàpànasati; Chapt. 9 on the Brahmavihàras;
Chapt. 14: first sections only (on the meaning of pa¤¤a)
Chapts. 18-23 selectively.




Appendix

SUTTA STUDY READINGS (AREA IV)

A. Basic Level

To cover this level I have selected two suttas from the Digha Nikaya and about fifty Suttas from the Majjhima Nikaya. These are intended to span a wide range of fundamental Dhamma teachings that should be within the frameof reference of any monk or nun who is to qualify as a dhammakathika, an expounder of the Dhamma.

I have divided the suttas into three general categories: Doctrine, Practice, and Monasatic Life. These categories, howtver, are by no means rigidly separable: the boundaries between them are highly porous, and many suttas assigned to one category might have also been assigned to one of the other two categories. The three categories should be seen as highlighting points of emphasis rather than as fixed types of contents.







From the Digha Nikaya:
(1) Sama¤¤aphala Sutta (DN2)
(2) Mahàsatipaññhàna (DN 22)


Both auttas may, of course, be found in Thus Have I Heard. The Sama¤¤aphala, with its Commentary, has been translated in Bhikkhu Bodhi. Discourse on the Fruits of Recluseship.(BPS). The Mahà¬satipaññhàna, within clear contemporary exposition, can be found in Nyanaponika Thera, The Heart of Buddhist Meditation (BPS); with an explanation that leans heavily upon the classical Commentary, in U Sãlànanda, The Four Foundations of Mindfulness. (Study of this same sutta with the actual Commentary and Sub-Commentary, will come again under Advanced Level Sutta Study.) Both these suttas belong to the category of Practice.

From the Majjhima Nikàya:
The complete translation by Bhikkhu ¥àõamoli, edited and revised by Bhikkhu Bodhi is published by Wisdom Publications. Suttas are listed by number only; those followed by an asterisk are also available in Wheel format from BPS.)

(i) Doctrine: 9* II* 12* 13 22* 26* 28* 38 4i* 44 . 63* 72 75 77 95 109 115 117 @135* 137 140 141 148
(ii) Practice: 2 7* 8* (10)* i6 19 20* 21 (27) 39 53 6i 62 64 107 118* 119
(iii) Monastic Life: 3 5 6 15 30 33 48 67 82* 104

Note: In the case of the suttas enclosed in parenthesis the nucleus of these suttas is already contained in the two Dãgha suttas listed above, but because of their sikx:gion recognized importance, they are listed again under the Majjhima.

B. Intermediate Level

The Suttas listed here are not more difficult than those listed at the Basic Level, but they are more detailed and specialized in their treatment of important Dhamma topics. For translations, at present the complete Sa§yutta and Aïguttara are available only in the PTS translations, which are desperately in need of replacement. I am currently working on a new translation of the Sa§yutta, but it will not be ready for a long time yet. An alternative to the PTS translations is mentioned below. It is to be hoped, though, that those students who wish to undertake Intermediate Level sutta study will have mastered Pali well enough to read the suttas in the original. Their grammar and vocabulary are not very difficult. From the Sa§yutta Nikàya:

Sa§yutta: 12 13 14 15; 22; 35 36 43 44; 45-56

from the Aïguttara Nikàya:
Nipàta: The Fours, The Fives, The Sixes
Although this may appear to be a formidable amount of material, it should be noted that many suttas in these collections are repetitive, with only minor variations.

As an alternative to the PTS translations of the entire collections, one might try the BPS anthologies:

Sa§yutta Nikàya Anthology (bound volumes of three Wheels) Aïguttara Nikàya Anthology (also bound volume of three Wheels)

At this level, one mi.ght also include The Questions of King Milinda (Milindapa¤ha). The abridged edition issued by the BPS contains enough material from this work.




C. Advanced Level

Brahmajàla Sutta & Commentaries (= The All-Embracing Net of Views)
Målapariyàya Sutta & Commentaries (= Discourse on the Root of Existence)
Mahànidàna Sutta & Commentaries (= Great Discourse on Causation)
Satipaññhàna Sutta & c ommentaries (= The Way of Mindfulness)

All the above are published by BPS; the first three in translation by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the fourth in translation by Soma Thera.


BPS Wheel editions of recommended Majjhima Suttas:

MN 9: The Discourse on Right View- (Wh 377/379)
MN 22: The Discourse on the Snake Simile (wh 48/49)
MN 26: The Noble Quest (Wh 198)
MN 28: The Greater Discourse on the Elephant Footprint Simile (Wh 101)
MN 41: found in: The Buddha's Words on Kamma (Wh 248/249)
MN 63 : Cula Màluïkya Sutta (Wh 98/99)
MN 135: found in: The Buddha's words on Kamma (Wh 248/249)
MN 7: The Simile of the Cloth & the Discourse on Effacement (Wh 61/62)
MN 10: The Foundations of Mindfulness (Wh 19)
MN 20: The Removal of Distracting Thoughts (Wh 21)
MN 118: Mindfulness of Breathing (BP 502)
MN 82: The Raññhapàla Sutta (Wh 110)
MN 11, 12 : Both found in: The Lion's Roar Suttas




<<<  >>>
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby gavesako » Fri Jul 31, 2009 7:12 pm

Just to inform you that we are just thinking about starting a program of Buddhist education (Dhamma school) along these lines at the newly established Bodhi Vihara Freising, near Munich in Germany. Any support is welcome.

www.bodhi-vihara.org
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby cooran » Fri Jul 31, 2009 7:47 pm

Thanks for the website Ven. Gavesako.

I don't read or speak German ~ but I will print the Archive page and the current page and photos and take them to Ven. Dhammasiha this weekend.
I admire and understand his "no technology unless absolutely essential (i.e. phone and fax)" but, just sometimes ..... :smile:

metta and respect,
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby cooran » Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:13 pm

English language links to Ven. Gavesako's Buddhist Monastery of Freising in Germany:

English
http://bodhi-vihara.org/pages/english.php
About
http://bodhi-vihara.org/pages/english/about.php
Monastery Activities
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metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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Cittasanto
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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sat Aug 01, 2009 9:53 am

Hi Bhante, & Chris

I would be happy to provide any support I can Bhante (open invitation no time limits), although not a German Speeker (my english is bad enough and I'm a native speaker :( )
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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gavesako
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Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby gavesako » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:03 pm

Hello all,

Thanks for your interest, I will keep you posted and the website should also be updated soon. We may perhaps need some books for the library, although we already have a good number of them. The teachings may also be given in English, depending on the audience. Freising (and nearby Munich) has university students from all over the world and it is good to get them involved.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts

User avatar
Cittasanto
Posts: 5876
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1
Location: Ellan Vannin
Contact:

Re: Theravada Buddhist Education

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:53 pm

Please let me know if there are any books the project could do with

gavesako wrote:Hello all,

Thanks for your interest, I will keep you posted and the website should also be updated soon. We may perhaps need some books for the library, although we already have a good number of them. The teachings may also be given in English, depending on the audience. Freising (and nearby Munich) has university students from all over the world and it is good to get them involved.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."


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