meditation in bad times

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom

meditation in bad times

Postby JamesNewell » Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:34 am

With the slowly growing military confrontation between China and the United States in the ocean areas near China, and the developing cyberwar, it would be a good idea to do as much meditation as one can.

Jim
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Re: meditation in bad times

Postby cooran » Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:05 am

Hello James,

Why is that?

With metta,
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: meditation in bad times

Postby Mkoll » Fri Jan 17, 2014 2:16 pm

Is it really worth dwelling on such things? What do they do to one's mind?

Bhikkhus, whatever a bhikkhu frequently thinks and ponders upon, that will become the inclination of his mind.
-MN 19

:anjali:
Peace,
James
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Re: meditation in bad times

Postby Babadhari » Fri Jan 17, 2014 4:15 pm

"Monks, these two are fools. Which two? The one who takes up a burden that hasn't fallen to him, and the one who doesn't take up a burden that has. These two are fools."
AN 2.98 Bala Suuta
:buddha1:
Aflame with the fire of passion, the fire of aversion, the fire of delusion.
Aflame, with birth, aging & death, with sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs ......

Seeing thus, the disciple of the Noble One grows disenchanted. SN 35.28
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Re: meditation in bad times

Postby culaavuso » Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:18 pm

JamesNewell wrote:it would be a good idea to do as much meditation as one can.


AN6.20
AN6.20: Maranassati Sutta wrote:Further, there is the case where a monk, as night departs and day returns, reflects: 'Many are the [possible] causes of my death. A snake might bite me, a scorpion might sting me, a centipede might bite me. That would be how my death would come about. That would be an obstruction for me. Stumbling, I might fall; my food, digested, might trouble me; my bile might be provoked, my phlegm... piercing wind forces [in the body] might be provoked. That would be how my death would come about. That would be an obstruction for me.' Then the monk should investigate: 'Are there any evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by me that would be an obstruction for me were I to die during the day?' If, on reflecting, he realizes that there are evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by him that would be an obstruction for him were he to die during the day, then he should put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness for the abandoning of those very same evil, unskillful qualities. Just as when a person whose turban or head was on fire would put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness to put out the fire on his turban or head, in the same way the monk should put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness for the abandoning of those very same evil, unskillful qualities. But if, on reflecting, he realizes that there are no evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by him that would be an obstruction for him were he to die during the day, then for that very reason he should dwell in joy & rapture, training himself day & night in skillful qualities.
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Re: meditation in bad times

Postby kmath » Sat Jan 18, 2014 7:42 am

culaavuso wrote:
JamesNewell wrote:it would be a good idea to do as much meditation as one can.


AN6.20
AN6.20: Maranassati Sutta wrote:Further, there is the case where a monk, as night departs and day returns, reflects: 'Many are the [possible] causes of my death. A snake might bite me, a scorpion might sting me, a centipede might bite me. That would be how my death would come about. That would be an obstruction for me. Stumbling, I might fall; my food, digested, might trouble me; my bile might be provoked, my phlegm... piercing wind forces [in the body] might be provoked. That would be how my death would come about. That would be an obstruction for me.' Then the monk should investigate: 'Are there any evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by me that would be an obstruction for me were I to die during the day?' If, on reflecting, he realizes that there are evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by him that would be an obstruction for him were he to die during the day, then he should put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness for the abandoning of those very same evil, unskillful qualities. Just as when a person whose turban or head was on fire would put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness to put out the fire on his turban or head, in the same way the monk should put forth extra desire, effort, diligence, endeavor, undivided mindfulness, & alertness for the abandoning of those very same evil, unskillful qualities. But if, on reflecting, he realizes that there are no evil, unskillful mental qualities unabandoned by him that would be an obstruction for him were he to die during the day, then for that very reason he should dwell in joy & rapture, training himself day & night in skillful qualities.



:goodpost: :goodpost:

In fact, excellent post in my opinion.
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