Monks walking tudong in modern England

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom

Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby gavesako » Sat Aug 07, 2010 8:02 am

Blistered Feet – Blissful Mind

by Tim Price

http://blisteredfeet-blissfulmind.net/


TO FOLLOW THE STORY OF ‘TUDONG’

This site is offered as an information resource and discussion forum in response to numerous comments about the book “Blistered feet Blissful mind”. You can find insights into the actual people and places featured in the stories, reflections from the author, the artist and the publisher.

There are also contributions from other monks and nuns who have walked a similar path and information about the tradition we follow.

The real path is of course an inner one. To reveal and discover the way it really is. To open to the peace and brilliance of a mind that is truly awake.

May all beings be well and free from suffering.
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby retrofuturist » Sat Aug 07, 2010 8:10 am

Thanks bhante, inspiring stuff.

I read a short BPS Leaves booklet about someone who did this in England a while ago... very interesting.

May all beings be happy.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby gavesako » Mon Oct 04, 2010 9:53 am

BLISTERED FEET BLISSFUL MIND

Author: Tim Price

Illustrations: Victor Lunn-Rockliffe



This is a book written by a Buddhist monk, about the experiences of two monks on “Tudong” (that is, an extended walk relying entirely on alms for food, shelter and survival) during a South of England summer.

It portrays life that is lived on the edge of society, by people who never touch money, and who undertake to embody the 2,500 year old teaching of the Buddha in modern England.



Each themed chapter is based on true events and depicts the poignant encounters of the robed travellers as they meet with some extraordinary and ordinary people of England- the “Everyman” of the 21st century. Each persons individual reaction to the monks- whether it be benign, threatening, generous, mean, compassionate, seductive, enchanting, friendly, hostile or indifferent- inevitably contributes to the learning and wisdom of the journeymen.

The stories combine to present a clear picture of Buddhism ‘working’ in 21st century Britain, yet, there is no attempt to convince, convert, or argue for the ‘rightness’ of a belief system.



The author has written the stories as they are remembered, without gloss, editing or deliberate crafting. This lack of sophistication gives his accounts a raw and sometimes startling authenticity of the mendicant way of life: with its dangers, hardships and surprises.



Throughout the book the, sometimes disquieting, often beautiful, illustrations bring life and colour to the author’s accounts.



Blistered Feet Blissful Mind may act as an ideal key-text for teachers and students of Religious Education; each chapter would make a useful theme and/ or accompaniment for an RE lessons, at GCSE through to degree level.

The book would sit well alongside GCSE syllabuses as its exploration of Buddhism, meditation and ‘faith’ is uniquely contextualised by a Buddhist monk, within the contemporary world. It could also be a beneficial learning tool for the student in further/ higher education as it offers great insight, and opportunity for greater in-depth analysis, into Theravada Buddhism’s actions, values and beliefs.

This book should be in every school, college and university library- the living essence of Buddhism has never been explained so clearly in a modern work.



The author currently lives in a Theravadan Buddhist monastery in the UK.

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See http://blisteredfeet-blissfulmind.net/?p=406
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby Shonin » Mon Oct 04, 2010 11:56 am

I know a monk Than Manapo who walked the Cotswold Way recently with little more that his robe and bowl, collecting alms on his way. He had some very good stories to tell afterwards. I was impressed with people's generosity in a country which has no alms tradition.
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby Ytrog » Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:18 pm

I saw a good article about such a tudong by Ajahn Succito in the Forest Sangha Newsletter: http://www.fsnewsletter.amaravati.org/pdf/FSNL_89.pdf
Suffering is asking from life what it can never give you.


mindfulness, bliss and beyond (page 8) wrote:Do not linger on the past. Do not keep carrying around coffins full of dead moments


If you see any unskillful speech (or other action) from me let me know, so I can learn from it.
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby Cal » Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:27 pm

I'm currently reading 'Blistered Feet, Blissful Mind'. It's a real pleasure to read, though surprising and shockingly raw at times. I've been trying to eek it out by reading one story every few days, to give each time to settle. :thinking:

I would highly recommend the book :reading:

Cal
Right Speech: It is spoken at the right time. It is spoken in truth. It is spoken affectionately. It is spoken beneficially. It is spoken with a mind of good-will. [AN 5.198]

Personally, I seem to gain the most insight when I am under the most pressure, when life is at its most unpleasant. There is something in me on those occasions which feels that there is nothing left but to be aware of 'this'. Ajahn Sumedho - Don't Take Your Life Personally, p288
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby gavesako » Thu Jan 05, 2012 9:09 pm

Tudong in Dhammakaya style with flowers under feet
Dhammakaya monks walk tudong as a group with massive support from the laypeople in order to build their parami

http://www.dmc.tv/pages/en_news/Dhammac ... nga-3.html
:shrug:

* * *

I am sure they will not be getting any blisters on their feet! :P


Compare http://www.blisteredfeet-blissfulmind.net/
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby Bankei » Sat Jan 07, 2012 11:12 pm

gavesako wrote:Tudong in Dhammakaya style with flowers under feet
Dhammakaya monks walk tudong as a group with massive support from the laypeople in order to build their parami

http://www.dmc.tv/pages/en_news/Dhammac ... nga-3.html
:shrug:

* * *

I am sure they will not be getting any blisters on their feet! :P


Compare http://www.blisteredfeet-blissfulmind.net/


Hi Bhante

I cringe when I read about Dhammakaya and this is no exception. It seems they are trying to get people to place rose petals all the way on the path of 365km for the 'monks' to walk on.

The Buddha would be rolling in his grave (if he had one).
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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby gavesako » Sun Jan 08, 2012 6:34 pm

The Photo Collection of Dhammachai Dhutanga
In Six Provinces, 365 km long
To Welcome New Year 2012
Remove dangers and troubles
Make the big merit to Thailand
On January 5th, 2012

http://www.dmc.tv/pages/en/scoop/photo- ... -2012.html
http://www.dmc.tv/pages/en/scoop/photo- ... -2012.html
http://www.dmc.tv/pages/en/scoop/photo- ... -2012.html


Some of the captions below the photos are quite telling:

Mr. Tawee Narissirikul, deputy governor of Ayutthaya province, paved rose petals together at Tripharasimakhet Temple in the morning
The Most Ven. Phradhampidok, the Buddhist Ecclesiastical Provincial Governor of Saraburi, and the Most Ven. Phrarajpariyattisudhi, the Buddhist Ecclesiastical Provincial Governor of Lopburi, have led the monks to perform the Dhammachai Dhutanga
Let’s come to welcome the dhutanga monks together and then your life will be happy and smooth like walking on the rose way
This disciple flew from Norway to welcome the dhutanga monks
1,127 dhutanga monks are the real monks who have practiced and meditated well
Each congregation paving rose petals would receive a card to exchange for a small Buddha coin, as a gift, at the stop over point on that day
Congregations went to welcome the Dhammachai Dhutanga monks in the morning of January 5th, 2012



It is an interesting socio-religious phenomenon to observe, it shows the underlying ideas of the Thai Buddhist population and the deeply rooted belief in ritualistic communal merit-making activities following the pattern of the Apadana stories in the later section of the Tipitaka.

I think that these "dhutanga monks" are basically re-enacting the archetypal behaviour of a popular saint (the symbol of prosperity) and the masses of laypeople are using the opportunity to play their role in generating maximum merit for their future lives:

Phra Sivali Arahant


The monks soon noticed a strange phenomenon when they were with Phra Sivali as Phra Sivali always seemed to have an abundance of rich, fragrant food and the other requisites (robes, shelter and medicine). Monks who were with him also had the opportunity to share in the bounty. Wherever Phra Sivali went, people flocked around to prepare food for him. Donors offered Phra Sivali with all the requisites of a monk every time he went on his alms round.

Therefore, it was that wherever Phra Sivali travelled both people and devas supported him. He and his retinue of 500 monks were in an uninhabited forest for seven days, but they were not short of food. The Devas made sure that they fulfil all his requirements. Similarly, when Phra Sivali was travelling through the desert he was well provided with requisites. The Buddha, seeing that Phra Sivali was fulfilling a previous aspiration in His reign, declared that he was foremost among the monks in obtaining requisites. He also instructed monks who were travelling on long, tedious journeys through uninhabited terrain be accompanied by Phra Sivali, as with him by their side they would be ensured of the requisites. In fact, on one occasion when the Buddha and His retinue of 30,000 monks were travelling to visit Phra Khadhiravaniya Revata (Phra Sariputta’s younger brother) they had to cross an uninhabited forest. Phra Ánanda, fearing that they would not be able to obtain food in the jungle for such a large number of monks, questioned the Buddha about the logistics of the journey. The Buddha assured Phra Ánanda that they had nothing to worry about as Phra Sivali was with them. With Phra Sivali present, there would be no shortage of food because even the Devas reveled in taking care of his requirements.

In general, only the doer reaps the effects of one’s wholesome and unwholesome intentional actions. However, there are instances, as with Phra Sivali, that others too benefit from unusually strong actions of another. This overflow of the results of the effect of a persons strong kamma on others is known as nissandha pala (overflowing results of kamma). While vipaka pala, results of kamma are reaped only by the doer nissandha pala are experienced by others who happen to be with you. Nissandha pala could be both wholesome and unwholesome in accordance with the deed performed. For instance, Phra Sariputta did not obtain alms in one instance resulting from the nissandha pala of Losaka’s strong unwholesome deeds.

To seek the cause of this strange phenomenon we need to go back many aeons to the time of the Buddha Padumuttara. Phra Sivali, who had been born as a poor man, had the opportunity to see the Buddha Padumuttara confer on another monk the honor of being foremost among monks who obtain the requisites. Fascinated by the way, everyone desired to provide alms and robes to this monk; Phra Sivali had decided that he too would like to hold a similar position in a future birth. He had then performed many acts of generosity to the Buddha Padumuttara and His retinue and made an aspiration.

The Buddha Padumuttara, foreseeing that Phra Sivali’s aspiration would be fulfilled had prophesied that at the time of the Gotama Buddha he would be foremost among the monks who obtained requisites. From this point onwards, Phra Sivali had started in earnest to work toward his aspiration. At death, he was reborn in a heavenly realm where he enjoyed many years of heavenly bliss.

https://sites.google.com/site/watpalela ... li-arahant
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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Re: Monks walking tudong in modern England

Postby Bankei » Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:46 am

Very interesting.

notice that all the monks have identical coloured and type of robes on, all exactly the same. They are also all walking in military like formation with everyone holding the umbrella over their shoulders in the same manner. Also they are not wearing the robes over both shoulders while outside the temple.
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