Did I imagine this?

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom

Did I imagine this?

Postby texastheravadin » Sat Sep 25, 2010 2:38 pm

Okay for the life of me I cannot track down where I read or heard about this, but I'm almost sure it was not something that I imagined...

Is there or is there not a - for lack of a better term - class of lay Buddhists who are not novices or monastics, but who instead of taking the Five Precepts permanently take the Eight Precepts? As in for life? And if so, what's the term? And do they wear white robes, or is that something that all lay people do on special occasions? I ask because one of the first times I visited the local wat, the ladies that showed me around were householders, but they were wearing special white robes/dresses or something. They said that it was some kind of holiday or special time where they stayed at the wat to help out.

Maybe I'm just :cookoo: but I swear I came upon this practice before...

Josh
"Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened, blessed." — AN 11.12
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Re: Did I imagine this?

Postby bodom » Sat Sep 25, 2010 2:43 pm

Hi texastheravadin

Are you thinking of an Anagarika?

In Theravada Buddhism, an anagarika(Pali: anāgārika/ā; lit., "homeless one") is a lay attendant for nuns or monks. The monastic rules of Vinaya restrict nuns and monks from many tasks that might be needed, including the use of money, driving, cooking, digging and cutting plants, so lay attendants help bridge this gap. All anagarika take the Eight Precepts, and often have the intention of becoming a nun or monk at a later point, though not always. In some monasteries a period as an anagarika, often one year, is required in order to take novice ordination.


:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Did I imagine this?

Postby bodom » Sat Sep 25, 2010 2:50 pm

They said that it was some kind of holiday or special time where they stayed at the wat to help out.


They are referring to the Uposatha.

Uposatha days are times of renewed dedication to Dhamma practice, observed by lay followers and monastics throughout the world of Theravada Buddhism....

Lay people observe the Eight Precepts on Uposatha days, as a support for meditation practice and as a way to re-energize commitment to the Dhamma. Whenever possible, lay people use these days as an opportunity to visit the local monastery, in order to make special offerings to the Sangha, to listen to Dhamma, and to practice meditation with Dhamma companions late into the night. For those not closely affiliated with a local monastery, it can simply be an opportunity to step up one's efforts in meditation, while drawing on the invisible support of millions of other practicing Buddhists around the world.


:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Did I imagine this?

Postby Ytrog » Sat Sep 25, 2010 6:48 pm

In some monasteries a period as an anagarika, often one year, is required in order to take novice ordination.


I thought that some monasteries required a year as a samanera before ordaining as a bhikku. Am I mistaken or is this yet another way some monasteries handle ordinations?
Suffering is asking from life what it can never give you.


mindfulness, bliss and beyond (page 8) wrote:Do not linger on the past. Do not keep carrying around coffins full of dead moments


If you see any unskillful speech (or other action) from me let me know, so I can learn from it.
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Re: Did I imagine this?

Postby BlackBird » Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:23 pm

Ytrog wrote:
In some monasteries a period as an anagarika, often one year, is required in order to take novice ordination.


I thought that some monasteries required a year as a samanera before ordaining as a bhikku. Am I mistaken or is this yet another way some monasteries handle ordinations?


Supposing you fit the bill, in the Ajahn Chah group it's:
1. A few months as a lay person
2. 1 year as an Anagarika (some exceptions for WPN due to visa issues)
3. 1 year as a Samanera

After that you can take higher ordination as a Bhikkhu.

There are similar (although often less) requirements for monastic sects which uphold a similar level of Vinaya.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
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Re: Did I imagine this?

Postby Ytrog » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:21 am

BlackBird wrote:
Ytrog wrote:
In some monasteries a period as an anagarika, often one year, is required in order to take novice ordination.


I thought that some monasteries required a year as a samanera before ordaining as a bhikku. Am I mistaken or is this yet another way some monasteries handle ordinations?


Supposing you fit the bill, in the Ajahn Chah group it's:
1. A few months as a lay person
2. 1 year as an Anagarika (some exceptions for WPN due to visa issues)
3. 1 year as a Samanera

After that you can take higher ordination as a Bhikkhu.

There are similar (although often less) requirements for monastic sects which uphold a similar level of Vinaya.


I've heard about the year as a Samanera, but never about the year as an Anagarika. Good to know.
Suffering is asking from life what it can never give you.


mindfulness, bliss and beyond (page 8) wrote:Do not linger on the past. Do not keep carrying around coffins full of dead moments


If you see any unskillful speech (or other action) from me let me know, so I can learn from it.
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