David's Book:The One Prerequisite To Being A Brahmin

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David's Book:The One Prerequisite To Being A Brahmin

Postby yawares » Sun Sep 16, 2012 12:35 pm

Dear Members,

:candle: The One Prerequisite to being a Brahmin :candle:
[By Dr.David N.Snyder]


The One Prerequisite to being a Brahmin;
Buddha on Equality
Middle Way Buddhism vs.
Fundamentalist Buddhism


As a religion / path that is a middle way, we would not expect to find fundamentalists in
Buddhism. But like any religion, there are those who take the literal word and use it to match
prevailing cultural tendencies and then it can become sexist. But this is not Buddhism. The
Buddha‘s teachings are about universal tolerance and acceptance of all. Everyone has the
capacity for enlightenment and no one person or gender is superior to another. Here is some
background information to confirm the ―middle way approach and the problems with the
extremist, fundamentalist approach:


Before enlightenment, the Buddha spent six years meditating in the Dungasiri Mountains in a
cave. He rarely ate food and underwent long fasts. He was practicing the ascetic practices which
to this day are still practiced by some Hindu ascetic sadhus (spiritual contemplatives). He
reached high level of trance and absorption, but not the ultimate insights of enlightenment. One
day he heard some people talking about their instruments. A teacher remarked that the strings
will not work if they are too tight or if they are too loose. The future Buddha continued his
meditation and realized that his extremist practices were not working to get him to the final
liberation. He realized that a ―middle way was necessary. He bathed in the river and then
accepted some rice cooked in milk from a local village woman named Sujata. It was only then
with the nourishment from food and after the relaxing bath in the river that the future Buddha
could sit under the Bodhi tree and later attain enlightenment.


By definition, this ―middle way cannot be a fundamentalist path. Fundamentalists in all
religions are very dogmatic, inflexible, uncompromising, and repeat and memorize scripture
references ad nauseam to attack those with progressive ideas and philosophies in their religions.
Often, fundamentalist views become authoritarian, dictatorial, and sometimes even violent. In
contrast, the Buddha‘s middle way is a progressive way, that is compromising, flexible, open to
other views, tolerant, unattached, and peaceful.


―Bhikkhus, there are these four knots. What four? The bodily knot of covetousness, the bodily
knot of ill will, the bodily knot of distorted grasp of rules and vows, the bodily knot of adherence
to dogmatic assertion of truth.Samyutta Nikaya 45.174


The Buddha also clearly did not say that the literal word of the discourses should be accepted.
This is most noted in the Kalama Sutta (Anguttara Nikaya 3.65) and also in the following
discourse:

Monks, these two slander the Tathagata. Which two? He who explains a discourse whose
meaning needs to be inferred as one whose meaning has already been fully drawn out. And he
who explains a discourse whose meaning has already been fully drawn out as one whose
meaning needs to be inferred. These are two who slander the Tathagata.

Anguttara Nikaya 2.25


Note the words in bold, which show that there are at least some discourses where the meaning is
to be inferred and the literal meaning will be wrong. And then, also, there are some discourses
which should be taken literally, but the point the Buddha makes, is that it is not all of them. This
is repeated throughout the Pali Canon, including, Anguttara Nikaya 8.62 and Aguttara Nikaya
9.19 where it states the competent or good monk is one who knows the teaching in ―letter and
spirit.


Ven. Dhammika, (2007) who has written several Dhamma books, had these wise words to say
about fundamentalism:

Because of Buddhism's generally open and explorative nature, it has only rarely produced
fundamentalists or fundamentalist movements. The Buddha said that while examining his
teachings one has to take into account the letter (vyanjana) but also the spirit (attha), implying
that there are dimensions and nuances of the Dhamma beyond the mere words and that knowing
just the words is not enough
. (Digha Nikaya 3.127, Vinaya 1.20).


Fundamentalists tend to be dogmatic in the practice of their religion and intolerant towards
other religions. If anything, they are often even more intolerant of their fellow religionists who
interpret the scriptures differently from how they themselves do.


********to be continued*************
yawares :anjali:
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Re: David's Book:The One Prerequisite To Being A Brahmin

Postby DAWN » Sun Sep 16, 2012 12:50 pm

Merci :anjali:
Sabbe dhamma anatta
We are not concurents...
I'am sorry for my english
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Re: David's Book:The One Prerequisite To Being A Brahmin

Postby yawares » Sun Sep 16, 2012 12:59 pm

DAWN wrote:Merci :anjali:

Dear DAWN,
I love the word MERCI...so Frenchy!

Merci beaucoup,
yawares
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Re: David's Book:The One Prerequisite To Being A Brahmin

Postby DAWN » Sun Sep 16, 2012 1:13 pm

This word is more common to me, so i can invest in it more large sense.
Sabbe dhamma anatta
We are not concurents...
I'am sorry for my english
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