How Buddhist view Jainism

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

How Buddhist view Jainism

Postby barcsimalsi » Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:12 am

I try comparing Buddhism with Jainism and found many things similar, from believing in karma to the way to liberation.

Buddhism claims that there will only be 1 sama-sam-buddha at 1 time/era so Mahavira cannot be a Buddha but both Gautama and Mahavira taught about their unsurpassed goal of Nirvana.

My question is: what state exactly Mahavira of Jainism seems to attain makes him acquired the same view like Buddha but distinguished itself from Buddhism?

I understand that the attainment of holyman or Buddhahood is not to be conjecture but this topic concerns about the solid description of Buddhist goal.
barcsimalsi
 
Posts: 385
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:33 am

Re: How Buddhist view Jainism

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:14 am

barcsimalsi wrote:I try comparing Buddhism with Jainism and found many things similar, from believing in karma to the way to liberation.

Buddhism claims that there will only be 1 sama-sam-buddha at 1 time/era so Mahavira cannot be a Buddha but both Gautama and Mahavira taught about their unsurpassed goal of Nirvana.

My question is: what state exactly Mahavira of Jainism seems to attain makes him acquired the same view like Buddha but distinguished itself from Buddhism?

I understand that the attainment of holyman or Buddhahood is not to be conjecture but this topic concerns about the solid description of Buddhist goal.

Mahavira was a very intelligent, compassionate man; however, he had serious wrong view when it came to the self and the workings of kamma. India was, after all, filled to the brim with spiritual seekers at that time. Mahavira was just another who came close to the truth but still had defilements that left enlightenment impossible.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
User avatar
LonesomeYogurt
 
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: America

Re: How Buddhist view Jainism

Postby Cittasanto » Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:03 am

barcsimalsi wrote:I try comparing Buddhism with Jainism and found many things similar, from believing in karma to the way to liberation.

Buddhism claims that there will only be 1 sama-sam-buddha at 1 time/era so Mahavira cannot be a Buddha but both Gautama and Mahavira taught about their unsurpassed goal of Nirvana.

My question is: what state exactly Mahavira of Jainism seems to attain makes him acquired the same view like Buddha but distinguished itself from Buddhism?

I understand that the attainment of holyman or Buddhahood is not to be conjecture but this topic concerns about the solid description of Buddhist goal.

Hi,
The Jain are known as Nigantha in the canon. and although there is a shared acceptance or denial on general points such as Kamma, rebirth... within the canon the specifics are actually very different.

I do not know of where the Jain texts or detailed studies of the texts are easily found or detailed information on current jain views are to compare Jains and Buddhists today or historically other than what is in the Buddhist canon which shows only general similarities.

for example, the nigantha try to purify past Kamma through external aesthetic practises the Buddhists try to develop skillful states and remove unskilled states as they are present and the theory behind this is completely different.
I also have heard the jains have a seven-fold instead of four-fold view of things (sorry I do not like the italiced wording but can not think of better)
the tetralema is - is; is not; both is & is not; neither is nor is not. the jains have maybe-ism and others but this is only something I have heard although was quite interested in finding out more, just no idea where to look.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
User avatar
Cittasanto
 
Posts: 5840
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin

Re: How Buddhist view Jainism

Postby barcsimalsi » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:57 am

LonesomeYogurt wrote:Mahavira was a very intelligent, compassionate man; however, he had serious wrong view when it came to the self and the workings of kamma. India was, after all, filled to the brim with spiritual seekers at that time. Mahavira was just another who came close to the truth but still had defilements that left enlightenment impossible.


So it means that Mahavira didn't realize that he needs to be rebirth again.
barcsimalsi
 
Posts: 385
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:33 am


Return to Open Dhamma

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 6 guests