Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby bsmiley96 » Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:49 pm

Hi, my name is Brandon :hello: and i have an assignment for school in which i have to interview a person of another religion ( I am Roman catholic) and i would really like to interview someone of the Buddhist faith because the very little i do know about Buddhism, i think is extremely interesting and would absolutely love to learn more! :sage:

if you could please take a few minutes to answer the following and post them in the thread it would be a huge help!

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?
2- what do you want other to know about your religion
3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?
4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?
5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?
6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?
7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?
8- what do you believe about diety/ies?
8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?
9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism
10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?
11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?

For those of your who answer, Thaank you for your time!!!! :namaste:
bsmiley96
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:26 pm

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:00 pm

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?

"The avoidance of any evil,
the performance of what is good,
the purifying of one's own mind:
this is the teaching
of the Buddhas."

2- what do you want other to know about your religion

That Buddhism is rational, compassionate path to freedom from suffering.

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?

Buddhism rejects the idea of a soul or permanent self, which is fairly rare for most religions.

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?

The beautiful, reasonable, and compassionate teachings of the Buddha that have helped me find happiness and peace in my present life.

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?

Buddhism is not a religion that puts a heavy emphasis on ritual, but meditation is the core of Buddhist practice, and I enjoy it very much.

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?

We are known for our Dhamma Wheel, which symbolizes the Noble Eightfold Path of Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, and Right Concentration.

Image

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?

I'm not sure exactly what this means?

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?

Most Buddhists believe that heavenly beings, which we call Devas, exist, but they are just like us; subject to aging, death, suffering, and rebirth according to their deeds. We don't worship them.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?

I wouldn't say I pray, but I do meditate.

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism

I think Jesus was a very compassionate and wise man, but I think that theism is Wrong View and a path to suffering.

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?

My favorite concept would be emptiness - the idea that all things are dependent on each other, impermanent and lacking in essential self.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?
There are probably about 50 Buddhists in my Idaho town.

Let me know if I can clarify any of those answers!
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
User avatar
LonesomeYogurt
 
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: America

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby befriend » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:17 pm

1 virtue
2 it is hard work it is not hippy dippy/flakey
3 no God
4 if you study it you will develop a love for buddha, its the most extensive body of writing known to man
5 reciting the 5 rememberances
6 a lion with 4 heads looking in the 4 directions, symbolizes the fearlessness of buddha and the roar symbolizes the teachings and how powerful they are
7 i dont know what you mean
8 sometimes i do just wish people to get better if they are ill
9 no comment
10 the amount of information covers so much ground
befriend
 
Posts: 770
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:39 am

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby bsmiley96 » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:18 pm

LonesomeYogurt wrote:1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?

"The avoidance of any evil,
the performance of what is good,
the purifying of one's own mind:
this is the teaching
of the Buddhas."

2- what do you want other to know about your religion

That Buddhism is rational, compassionate path to freedom from suffering.

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?

Buddhism rejects the idea of a soul or permanent self, which is fairly rare for most religions.

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?

The beautiful, reasonable, and compassionate teachings of the Buddha that have helped me find happiness and peace in my present life.

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?

Buddhism is not a religion that puts a heavy emphasis on ritual, but meditation is the core of Buddhist practice, and I enjoy it very much.

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?

We are known for our Dhamma Wheel, which symbolizes the Noble Eightfold Path of Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, and Right Concentration.

Image

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?

I'm not sure exactly what this means?

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?

Most Buddhists believe that heavenly beings, which we call Devas, exist, but they are just like us; subject to aging, death, suffering, and rebirth according to their deeds. We don't worship them.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?

I wouldn't say I pray, but I do meditate.

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism

I think Jesus was a very compassionate and wise man, but I think that theism is Wrong View and a path to suffering.

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?

My favorite concept would be emptiness - the idea that all things are dependent on each other, impermanent and lacking in essential self.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?
There are probably about 50 Buddhists in my Idaho town.

Let me know if I can clarify any of those answers!


Thank you A million! i'm sorry for missing this before but it seems i have a few more questions if you could answer them i would be very grateful!!!
1- According to your religion, what is the problem for humans (our dilema or flaw, etc) and what is the cause of this problem?
2- According to your religion what is the ideal state, goal or "ultimacy" for individuals?
3- What are the methods or means by which this ideal is achieved?
and i agree #7 did not make sense so just ignore it! :D
bsmiley96
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:26 pm

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:43 pm

bsmiley96 wrote:Thank you A million! i'm sorry for missing this before but it seems i have a few more questions if you could answer them i would be very grateful!!!
1- According to your religion, what is the problem for humans (our dilema or flaw, etc) and what is the cause of this problem?
2- According to your religion what is the ideal state, goal or "ultimacy" for individuals?
3- What are the methods or means by which this ideal is achieved?
and i agree #7 did not make sense so just ignore it! :D

The problem for human beings is suffering, and the cause of this problem is our desire or attachment. The Buddha taught that all things that exist, from mountains and mighty empires to thoughts and feelings and sensations, are all impermanent and uncontrollable. When we cling to these things, and mistake them for permanent and pretend they are under our control, then we suffer because of our ignorance. If we cling to and crave sensual pleasure, which is impermanent and out of our control, we suffer when we lose it; if we cling to and crave things like power or wealth or sex appeal, which are all impermanent and out of our control, we suffer when we lose them; if we cling to and crave the idea of "This is me, this is mine," then we suffer.

But if we can realize that all things really are just dependent on other things, like foam on the waves of an ocean, arising and ceasing in accordance with their conditions, then we can get rid of the ignorance that makes us run for one lump of foam or another. If you were building a house on what you thought was firm, solid concrete, and then slowly you chipped away at the paint until you saw that it was really just styrofoam, would you still want to build a house there or would you just naturally lose interest in doing so because you knew that it wouldn't turn out well? Buddhism is just that; slowly chipping away at our ignorance and seeing the true nature of things. Once you do, you naturally lose desire for the impermanent and unsatisfactory.

The ideal state is that of an Arahant, a person who has removed the unwholesome qualities of greed, hatred, and ignorance that make us suffer. The Buddha was an arahant, or Enlightened One. An enlightened person does not suffer because they are not attached to anything. They simply live, neither disliking or liking, just existing, full of joy and compassion and love and wisdom. Buddhists revere enlightened beings greatly, much like Catholics would revere saints.

The method to reach enlightenment is the Noble Eightfold path, which I described above. The Noble Eightfold Path can be broken up into three parts: Right Speech, Right Action and Right Livelihood make up the section on ethical living. Once you have a base in morality and your mind is not clouded by the unwholesome thoughts brought about by immoral actions, you can train your mind in mindfulness and concentration. This is where meditation comes in. Buddhist meditation is all about two things: samatha and vipassana, two words that mean "calm" and "insight." When we meditate, we are trying to make the mind still and sharp and clear, and we're also trying to use that sharpened mind to see the nature of reality clearly, so that we can see impermanence and non-self, the idea that there is no "me" or "you" but only a big heap of thoughts and feelings and emotions all playing off each other. This helps us develop wisdom, the third part of the Noble Eightfold Path, Right View. Once a wise person reaches this stage of the complete eradication of ignorance, they are enlightened and free from suffering.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
User avatar
LonesomeYogurt
 
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: America

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby bsmiley96 » Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:56 pm

Thanks so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :goodpost:
bsmiley96
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:26 pm

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Oct 28, 2012 8:28 pm

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?
From the Dhammapada
183.
Do not preform any unskilled acts, skilful acts are the way of a meditator.
So purify your own mind of defilements: this is the wisdom the Buddhas teach.

2- what do you want other to know about your religion
nothing, the question should be "What do others want to know?"

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?
the practicability.it is a fluid practice, able to move with life without being a hindrance when held correctly.

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?
the fruits of the practice, for myself and others

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?
Meditation, chanting the texts. I don't have a preference they are useful in my life in different ways.

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?
Dhamma Wheel symbolyses the eightfold path.

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?
it provides a path to a goal, and until that is reached there is a path to be walked.

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?
Although there are deities within Buddhism, no deity is considered useful to the path of practice within Theravada.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?
who would I prey to? I do reflect and use some Christian meditative techneques such as lecio Divina but no prayer in the way you would refer to.

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism
worldly.

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?
Do not preform any unskilled acts, skilful acts are the way of a meditator.
So purify your own mind of defilements: this is the wisdom the Buddhas teach.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?
Small, less than 10 in total.

1- According to your religion, what is the problem for humans (our dilema or flaw, etc) and what is the cause of this problem?
Dukkha, the cause is npt seeing things as they really are in reality.

2- According to your religion what is the ideal state, goal or "ultimacy" for individuals?
Nibbana - Enlightenment.

3- What are the methods or means by which this ideal is achieved?
The Noble Eightfold Path.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
With Metta
Upāsaka Cittasanto
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
User avatar
Cittasanto
 
Posts: 5668
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby Jason » Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:47 pm

bsmiley96 wrote:1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?


Practice. To me, Buddhism is primarily a mental and moral training that's designed to lessen suffering and lead to long-term welfare and happiness. So the most fundamental aspect for me is the noble eightfold path, which encompasses the entire path of practice of virtue (morality), concentration (meditation), and discernment (seeing things as they are).

2- what do you want other to know about your religion


Never really thought about it, to tell you the truth. Buddhism, being more a way of life, isn't really about evangelism, so I don't really discuss it with people who aren't already interested in it. One thing I suppose I'd like other people to know about it is that the Buddhist practice itself has a lot of practical benefits, being akin to a spiritual or philosophical form of psychology and psychotherapy, and having the potential to help make one a more stable and happier individual.

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?


The teachings on dependent co-arising, the psychological chain of mental causation/interaction that gives rise to suffering. In The Place of Buddhism in Indian Thought, for example, Ananda Guruge writes:

    Lastly, the contributions to Indian thought made by the Buddha should be carefully borne in mind. It was no doubt the Buddha's admirable sense of humility, which led to his statement that he was not an original thinker. His theory of Dependent Causation or Origination was the most remarkable contribution to Indian thought. It is unique in the history of philosophy.

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?


My faith or conviction in Buddhism initially stemmed from the profound simplicity of the teachings, as well as the compelling anecdotes of monks and practitioners like Ajahn Chah. My conviction in their efficacy continued to grow after observing the beneficial changes in my own life after studying the teachings and adopting the practice of the noble eightfold path.

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?


Buddhism is critical of the idea that rituals in and of themselves can purify one's mind and deeds of unskillfulness, and clinging to rites and rituals (or rituals and observances) as being salvific in and of themselves is something we're advised to let go off (MN 9). Instead, we're pointed towards focusing on our actions and the intentions underlying them because that's where the real work of moral and spiritual purification takes place (MN 61).

That said, there are a lot of practices, traditions, and cultural aspects to be found in Buddhism, and one of my favourites is morning and evening chanting (the chants are essentially teachings, as ancient Indians generally didn't write down things of this nature but memorized them). At monasteries, monks and nuns chant every morning and evening. They also tend to mediate in the middle or after the chanting. The chanting itself is quite lovely, and I find that chanting and meditating like that helps to brighten and relax the mind.

Other than that, meditation and the development of mindfulness is something that one is supposed to continually practice, and meditation can be quite enjoyable at times.

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?


The Buddha is a symbol of what we're trying to achieve. Buddha is more of a title than a name; it means 'awake' or 'awakened one.' The statues of the Buddha that one often finds in homes and temples represents the potential for awakening, and show the peace and serenity of one who's removed the defilements of greed, hatred, and delusion from their minds. The Buddha isn't meant to be worshiped so much as looked up to as a model or teacher.

The other most recognizable is the already-mentioned Dhamma wheel, with the eight spokes representing the eight factors of the aforementioned eightfold path.

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?


I suppose one could say that it does. The Buddha often described the path as a gradual training, for example (e.g., MN 107, Ud 5.5).

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?


Buddhism generally doesn't posit an omnipotent, omniscient, creator god analogous to the Judeo-Christian God, and it seems to me that there are three main reasons why the question of God is basically a non-issue in Buddhism.

Reason #1: According to the texts, a beginning point to samsara (literally 'wandering on') isn't evident (SN 15.3). This can be interpreted two ways — that a beginning point to the continual cycle of death and rebirth of beings isn't evident, or that a beginning point to the continual cycle of death and rebirth of the conceit 'I am,' the self-identification that designates a being (satta), isn't evident — and they're not mutually exclusive. Either way, the point is the same: all that really matters in the here and now is whether suffering is present, and if so, how it can be overcome.

Reason #2: The idea of a creator God is incompatible with certain aspects and teachings that, if taken to their logical conclusion, seem to reject the idea of, or a need for, a creator God. For one thing, the logic of dependent co-arising, while primarily concerned with the psychological process by which suffering arises in the mind, negates the idea of a creator God in that it precludes a first cause or a causeless cause when applied to cosmology (think of oscillating universe theory).

Then there's this famous problem of evil passage from the Bhuridatta Jataka (although, to be fair, this is most likely a later addition that some date to the 13th century):

    We see those rules enforced before our eyes,
    None but the Brahmans offer sacrifice,
    None but the Khattiya exercises sway,
    The Vessas plough, the Suddas must obey.
    These greedy liars propagate deceit,
    And fools believe the fictions they repeat;
    He who has eyes can see the sickening sight;
    Why does not Brahma set his creatures right?
    If his wide power no limits can restrain,
    Why is his hand so rarely spread to bless?
    Why are his creatures all condemned to pain?
    Why does he not to all give happiness?

    Why do fraud, lies, and ignorance prevail?
    Why triumphs falsehood, truth and justice fail?
    I count your Brahma one of the unjust among,
    Who made a world in which to shelter wrong.
    Those men are counted pure who only kill
    Frogs, worms, bees, snakes or insects as they will,
    These are your savage customs which I hate,
    Such as Kamboja hordes might emulate.
    If he who kills is counted innocent
    And if the victim safe to heaven is sent,
    Let Brahmans Brahmans kill so all were well
    And those who listen to the words they tell.

Nevertheless, even in the earliest parts of the Pali Canon, there are references to devas (literally 'radiant ones') or what we might call 'heavenly beings.' Early Buddhism seems to have incorporated the Brahmnanic/proto-Hindu pantheon and myths, but gives them a unique spin, transforming immortal gods into non-human beings who are more powerful and long-lived than ordinary humans, but by no means eternal, omnipresent, omnipotent, etc. (e.g., see DN 1), and creation myths into Dhamma lessons (e.g., DN 27). But more importantly, they can also be viewed metaphorically as the indulgent and hedonistic aspects of our psychology (i.e., the parts that are addicted to sensual pleasures).

Personally, I'm skeptical about the existence of such beings; although I suppose it's possible they could exist, especially if string theory is correct and extra dimensions do exist, which could account for the various 'realms of existence' in Buddhist cosmology. But I tend to view them metaphorically, and as such, they don't really play much of a role in my practice besides being illustrative.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?


No. N/A

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism


The short version is, while I don't believe in a creator God, nor, as a consequence, that Jesus is the son of God/God in the flesh, I do have a soft spot for him as a spiritual teacher, and I think some of the things he's reported as saying in the New Testament are pretty cool. I especially like, "Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone" (John 8:7), the Sermon on the Mount, and his many teachings on forgiveness. I don't know much about Catholicism, but I've found certain aspects of Orthodox Christianity appealing. In addition, you can find some of my thoughts about Christianity here and here, if you're interested.

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?


That our actions have effects, and that happiness is something we can achieve through our own efforts.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?


Fairly large. There's a large community of Tibetans, for example. There's also a variety of temples and meditation sitting groups in my area. The meditation group I usually sit with has at least 15-30 that people show up, more if visiting monks are in town.

12 - According to your religion, what is the problem for humans (our dilema or flaw, etc) and what is the cause of this problem?


Suffering. The cause of suffering is craving, and the cause of craving is ignorance, specifically ignorance of the four noble truths.

The way I see it, craving (tahna, literally 'thirst') is a very subtle but powerful aspect of our psychology that's directly tied to suffering. It's there, latent in the mind, waiting to exert its influence through mental fabrications by directing or at the very least encouraging the mind to feed upon sensory experiences via the five clinging-aggregates in an unhealthy way. When we're hungry, for example, our mind has a tendency to attach itself to the desire for food and create an identity around it, which can then create suffering in a number of ways, e.g., if we don't get what we want; if it doesn't live up to our expectations that we create around the attainment of our goal; if, in our greed, we eat too much and feel sick and lament our physical discomfort; etc. Craving, then, isn't simply our desire to or for X; it's the beginning of a mental chain of events that turns our desires for things into the potential for suffering.

That's part of the reason I think the Buddha basically approached the problem of mental stress and suffering like a doctor, formulating the four noble truths in the same way that ancient Indian physicians formulated medical diagnoses, i.e., disease (stress), cause (craving), prognosis (a cure/cessation of craving is possible), and treatment (the noble eightfold path).

13- According to your religion what is the ideal state, goal or "ultimacy" for individuals?


A true and lasting happiness that's not dependent on causes or conditions, i.e., the complete cessation of human mental suffering (which I think is analogous to the absence of the mental dart in SN 36.6).

- What are the methods or means by which this ideal is achieved?


See my answer to question #1.
"Sabbe dhamma nalam abhinivesaya" (AN 7.58).

leaves in the hand (Buddhist-related blog)
leaves in the forest (non-Buddhist related blog)
User avatar
Jason
 
Posts: 453
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 1:09 am
Location: Earth

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby whynotme » Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:02 am

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?
It doesn't have negative, it is good no matter at micro or large scale, short term or long term

2- what do you want other to know about your religion
It doesn't have negative, it is good no matter at micro or large scale, short term or long term

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?
It doesn't have negative, it is good no matter at micro or large scale, short term or long term

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?
It doesn't have negative, it is good no matter at micro or large scale, short term or long term

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?
Seeking and learning, examining everything with an opened mind

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?
The wheel, it is the symbol of motion, the truth, the law of the universe

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?
Yes, it does

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?
Yes I believe in deities' existence, but they don't mean much in my life. My life, good or bad depends on my actions.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?
No, I don't pray

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism
It has some good teachings in it, it has some bad teachings in it. Catholicism is the largest religion by number of believers

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?
Be wise, open minded. Get the result of what is done, good or bad is depends on oneself.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?
Most people where I live are half buddhists
Please stop following me
whynotme
 
Posts: 369
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2011 5:52 am

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby DAWN » Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:00 am

bsmiley96 wrote:Hi, my name is Brandon :hello: and i have an assignment for school in which i have to interview a person of another religion ( I am Roman catholic) and i would really like to interview someone of the Buddhist faith because the very little i do know about Buddhism, i think is extremely interesting and would absolutely love to learn more! :sage:

if you could please take a few minutes to answer the following and post them in the thread it would be a huge help!

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?
2- what do you want other to know about your religion
3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?
4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?
5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?
6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?
7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?
8- what do you believe about diety/ies?
8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?
9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism
10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?
11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?

For those of your who answer, Thaank you for your time!!!! :namaste:


You have twice the question number 8

1- What do you think the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion is ?
Renunciation

2- what do you want other to know about your religion
That there is a way to live without suffering

3-what do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion is?
Antta. Not-self.

4- what makes you a strong believer in your faith?
Dhamma (the law of nature) can be directly seen and direclty observate in each fenomena.

5-what are some of your religious traditions, rituals? and which do you favor most?
Pindabat

6- what are some symbols of your religion, and what do they symbolize?
Dhamma Wheel.
That symbolyse the Eightfold Path to liberation

7- Does your religion provide a guide for your future path?

If there is enought of kammic link - yes

8- what do you believe about diety/ies?
They are just living beings like us, who knows birth,agging and death, like all fenomena.

8- do you pray? if so how do you pray?
Yes. I close my eyes when i seat down to meditate, i open my eyes when i stand up to continue the mouvement.

9- what are your thoughts on Christianity, specifically Catholicism
Jesus is an Saint ascetic. Good exemple to be follow.

10- what is your favorite concept in your religion?
All Buddhist concept can be experianced personaly, cant be observate directly, so there is no concept to belieave, but fenomenas to observate. I dont know what is my favorite fenomena, perharps Sun Dawn or Rainbow.

11- in the area that you live in, how large is the buddhist community?
There is nobody that practice Theravada.
Sabbe dhamma anatta
We are not concurents...
I'am sorry for my english
User avatar
DAWN
 
Posts: 801
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:22 pm

Re: Buddhist with good understanding of their religion needed!

Postby barcsimalsi » Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:40 pm

bsmiley96 wrote:8- what do you believe about diety/ies?

Image
Image
barcsimalsi
 
Posts: 337
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:33 am


Return to Open Dhamma

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests