For convenience sake

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

For convenience sake

Postby greggorious » Tue Aug 27, 2013 9:46 pm

I was just wandering if any of you practice in a Buddhist tradition that may not exactly be your cup of tea but you go because it happens to be very convenient to you?
I ask this because I happened to bump into a Sri Lanka Buddhist monk virtually outside my house and he told me they've just built a Buddhist temple, walking distance from me. I don't know that much about Sri Lankan Buddhism but I've heard it's the most orthodox of the Theravada schools, which doesn't really thrill me. I'm more familiar with Zen, although it costs a bit to get there then and I also have to pay for it to, whereas this is walking distance and would be free.
Any thoughts? Anyone else encountered something similar?
"The original heart/mind shines like pure, clear water with the sweetest taste. But if the heart is pure, is our practice over? No, we must not cling even to this purity. We must go beyond all duality, all concepts, all bad, all good, all pure, all impure. We must go beyond self and nonself, beyond birth and death. When we see with the eye of wisdom, we know that the true Buddha is timeless, unborn, unrelated to any body, any history, any image. Buddha is the ground of all being, the realization of the truth of the unmoving mind.” Ajahn Chah
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Re: For convenience sake

Postby Ben » Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:55 pm

Greg,

Go check it out!
kind regards,

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Re: For convenience sake

Postby SarathW » Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:12 am

I consider every person I meet in my life as a messenger.
Sometimes they appear as strangers or even as enemies.
Just be open mind and see what message they are trying to convey to you.
:)
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Re: For convenience sake

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Wed Aug 28, 2013 5:22 am

We are all just wandering. Sri Lankans make a very nice cup of tea.

Go and check it out. Take from it whatever is helpful to your practice, and leave the rest.
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Re: For convenience sake

Postby Kim OHara » Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:52 pm

greggorious wrote:I was just wandering if any of you practice in a Buddhist tradition that may not exactly be your cup of tea but you go because it happens to be very convenient to you?

I sit with a Vajrayana group although I prefer Theravada. It's one of very few groups in my city (and the next nearest city with any kind of group is four hours' drive away), it is well run, friendly, and meets at a time that suits me. The only Theravada group is minuscule, with one visiting monk, and exists only because it serves one of our immigrant communities.
greggorious wrote:I ask this because I happened to bump into a Sri Lanka Buddhist monk virtually outside my house and he told me they've just built a Buddhist temple, walking distance from me. I don't know that much about Sri Lankan Buddhism but I've heard it's the most orthodox of the Theravada schools, which doesn't really thrill me. I'm more familiar with Zen, although it costs a bit to get there then and I also have to pay for it to, whereas this is walking distance and would be free.
Any thoughts? Anyone else encountered something similar?

I agree with previous responses - go for it, and get from it what you can.
One of the biggest advantages could be one that I value with my Vajrayana group: a bunch of nice folk who support and encourage my practice. Without that, I would have dropped away from it several times.

:namaste:
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Re: For convenience sake

Postby Jhana4 » Wed Aug 28, 2013 11:31 pm

I go to two different Sri Lankan viharas.

Most of the people at the meditation sessions, after the Americans, are Vietnemese and Cambodian immigrants. They don't have a problem with going to a Sri Lankan place.

FWIW, "orthodox" doesn't mean the same thing in regards to Buddhism, meditation, sutta study etc as what that word might mean with Christianity, Judiasm or Islam.
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.
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