Sense Restraint

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Sense Restraint

Postby K.Dhamma » Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:17 pm

Is sense restraint worth doing as a layperson? How much is beneficial? and lastly Why do it as a layperson?
"Remember you dont meditate to get anything, but to get rid of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go. If you want anything, you wont find it." - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby kmath » Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:36 pm

K.Dhamma wrote:Is sense restraint worth doing as a layperson? How much is beneficial? and lastly Why do it as a layperson?


Well, what are your goals? What brings you to Buddhism in the first place?
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby befriend » Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:37 pm

it protects your virtue. by practicing renunciation your actually chipping away at the root of all evil, which is craving.
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby K.Dhamma » Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:14 pm

I don't know about goals. But an end to suffering would be a good start. But I am just asking in general. I plan on ordaining so I thought about starting on sense restraint early.
"Remember you dont meditate to get anything, but to get rid of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go. If you want anything, you wont find it." - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby daverupa » Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:49 pm

It's worth starting very early, in fact, coming just after the precepts in descriptions of the gradual training. It forms a wholesome and practical foundation at every step.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby kmath » Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:17 am

I forget the Pali word for it, but the Buddha described a few actions as "always wholesome:"

1. Sense Restraint
2. Moderation in Eating
3. Devotion to Wakefulness

If you keep the five precepts and do your best to adhere to 1-3, that's a great foundation for mindfulness and samadhi.

:anjali:
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby greenjuice » Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:26 am

It'd b great to have a referrnce for that, I'd be interested to read that sutta.
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:34 am

It's part of the Gradual Training.
E.g. MN 107
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .horn.html

:anjali:
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby kmath » Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:48 am

greenjuice wrote:It'd b great to have a referrnce for that, I'd be interested to read that sutta.


I'll make sure to get that to you, but it may be a couple days.

(finals week)
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby bodom » Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:53 am

greenjuice wrote:It'd b great to have a referrnce for that, I'd be interested to read that sutta.


Here:

"Endowed with four qualities, a monk is incapable of falling away and is right in the presence of Unbinding. Which four?

"There is the case where a monk is consummate in virtue, guards the doors to his sense faculties, knows moderation in eating, & is devoted to wakefulness.

"And how is a monk consummate in virtue? There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults. This is how a monk is consummate in virtue.

"And how does a monk guard the doors to his sense faculties? There is the case where a monk, on seeing a form with the eye, does not grasp at any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the eye — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the eye. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

"On hearing a sound with the ear...

"On smelling an aroma with the nose...

"On tasting a flavor with the tongue...

"On feeling a tactile sensation with the body...

"On cognizing an idea with the intellect, he does not grasp at any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the intellect — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the intellect. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the intellect. This is how a monk guards the doors to his sense faculties.

"And how does a monk know moderation in eating? There is the case where a monk, considering it appropriately, takes his food not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification, but simply for the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life, thinking, 'I will destroy old feelings [of hunger] & not create new feelings [from overeating]. Thus I will maintain myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.' This is how a monk knows moderation in eating.

"And how is a monk devoted to wakefulness? There is the case where a monk during the day, sitting & pacing back & forth, cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. During the first watch of the night,[1] sitting & pacing back & forth, he cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. During the second watch of the night,[2] reclining on his right side, he takes up the lion's posture, one foot placed on top of the other, mindful, alert, with his mind set on getting up [either as soon as he awakens or at a particular time]. During the last watch of the night,[3] sitting & pacing back & forth, he cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. This is how a monk is devoted to wakefulness.

"Endowed with these four qualities, a monk is incapable of falling away and is right in the presence of Unbinding."


The monk established in virtue,
restrained with regard to the sense faculties,
knowing moderation in food,
& devoted to wakefulness:
dwelling thus ardently,
day & night, untiring,
he develops skillful qualities
for the attainment of rest from the yoke.
The monk delighting in heedfulness
and seeing danger in heedlessness
is incapable of falling away,
is right in the presence of Unbinding.


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Sense Restraint

Postby kmath » Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:13 am

Don't you just love that phrase "devotion to wakefulness"? You're DEVOTED to it, like it's a quality of heart. I love that.
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