Do you also read Mahayana Sutras?

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Do you also read Mahayana Sutras?

Yes, all the time
14
20%
Sometimes, in passing
30
43%
No, I only read the Tipitaka
26
37%
 
Total votes : 70

Re: Do you also read Mahayana Sutras?

Postby Sanghamitta » Wed Dec 15, 2010 1:49 pm

Spiny O'Norman wrote:
Sanghamitta wrote:That the caose of Dukkha is Tanha.


And in dependence on tanha arises upadana, which is usually translated as grasping or clinging.

Spiny

It is Spiny just as Dukkha is usually translated as "suffering" its actually more nuanced than that. In both cases. Upadana is posited between Tanha and Bhava ...becoming. "Grasping" or "clinging" puts the emphasis on an action, the grasping of or clinging to objects that arise in the field of consciousness. It is possible and perhaps preferable to see upadana as the a priori tendency that informs the reaction to sense objects.
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.
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Re: Do you also read Mahayana Sutras?

Postby kirk5a » Wed Dec 15, 2010 3:12 pm

My working outlook is that craving is for things which are not present, and clinging is for things which are.

In either case, there is this fixation on something.
"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230
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Re: Do you also read Mahayana Sutras?

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Wed Dec 15, 2010 4:38 pm

kirk5a wrote:My working outlook is that craving is for things which are not present, and clinging is for things which are.

In either case, there is this fixation on something.


If we're talking about upadana arising in dependence on tanha then I'd suggest that upadana is more habitual, over a longer time scale. The underlying tendency seems to me to be about attachment.

Spiny
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