non-violence in extreme cases.

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Re: non-violence in extreme cases.

Postby tiltbillings » Fri May 28, 2010 10:35 pm

Mukunda wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:Read what I wrote, but first read what you wrote and try to see it from an-other's eye's.


Not poking either. Sorry you feel that way. Be well.
OK; then just an example from you of unskilful writing.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: non-violence in extreme cases.

Postby cooran » Fri May 28, 2010 10:51 pm

Hello all,

This thread is entitled "non-violence in extreme cases."
And
Zac asked: i've always wondered about the extent to which non-violence could be practiced in hypothetical situations.


I work with people who are subjected to domestic violence ~ and of the largest number of categories is Verbal Violence of one sort or another:

Verbal or nonverbal abuse may include:
threatening or intimidating to gain compliance
destruction of the victim’s personal property and possessions, or threats to do so
violence to an object (such as a wall or piece of furniture) or pet, in the presence of the intended victim, as a way of instilling fear of further violence
yelling or screaming
name-calling
constant harassment
embarrassing, making fun of, or mocking the victim, either alone within the household, in public, or in front of family or friends
criticizing or diminishing the victim’s accomplishments or goals
not trusting the victim’s decision-making
telling the victim that they are worthless on their own, without the abuser
excessive possessiveness, isolation from friends and family
excessive checking-up on the victim to make sure they are at home or where they said they would be
saying hurtful things while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and using the substance as an excuse to say the hurtful things
blaming the victim for how the abuser acts or feels
making the victim remain on the premises after a fight, or leaving them somewhere else after a fight, just to “teach them a lesson”
making the victim feel that there is no way out of the relationship


Maybe the definition of how we see non-violence in ourselves and others could be widened a little?

So .... maybe we could all do a stock-take of our verbal (posting behaviour) and see how it measures up to actually being non-violent ... even our responses to what we perceive as wrong speech by others?

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: non-violence in extreme cases.

Postby tiltbillings » Fri May 28, 2010 11:08 pm

This thread seems to have gone beyond anything new or of value.
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This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19559
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

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