Compassion in the Theravada

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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:18 pm

Hi Hanzze,
Hanzze wrote:Maybe the discussion in "Do vaporizers kill mosquitoes? " helps to explain what I mean.

Wisdom (in his present potential) has its end and seams to solve the problem practical. As it is not taught how to handle with modern things in the Teaching we tend to look at solve the problem with our wordly wisdom.
The motivation of the questioner is not to kill. Compassion. There is no intention to let the mosquito just be feed.
Compassion would not lead to a solution like to reject the being in this case. It would effort to look why I dislike, why I reject... So it would bring one back to the practice of dhamma.
Just as an example vowed with opinions :-)

I'm sorry Hanzze, but I really can't understand the point you are trying to make.

But if you are implying that Buddhist teachers don't teach compassion for mosquito's you're not listening to the same teachers that I do.

It would be helpful if you could explain exactly how you think that Buddha recommended practising compassion, backed up with some quotations from the Suttas, and how these methods are misunderstood today.

And I don't mean random examples of monks or laypeople doing things that are clearly against the Dhamma. I, too, could cite plenty of cases of that from experiences in Thailand and elsewhere, and if that's all you mean then there's not much to discuss. Clearly bad things happen all over the place.

But do you think that there are sincere and serious teachers and practitioners misunderstanding the Dhamma today?

:anjali:
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Individual » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:27 pm

If a crazy homeless man tries to steal food from you, the compassionate thing to do is to repel him by spraying him down with something stinky

Just kidding. Not humans, only insects
The best things in life aren't things.

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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:30 pm

Hi Invividual,
Individual wrote:If a crazy homeless man tries to steal food from you, the compassionate thing to do is to repel him by spraying him down with something stinky

Just kidding. Not humans, only insects

And your point is?

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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Hanzze » Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:06 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 06, 2010 9:31 pm

Sorry Hanzze,

I've really no idea what you are trying to say.

I agree with retro's post. I see no lack of compassion in the teachings that I have heard.
retrofuturist wrote:When you understand the causes of suffering and your own experiences with dukkha, you understand also that other people experience similar sufferings too.

Having compassion for your own suffering, it's hard to not extend that compassion to others who are suffering in their own way. Or so I find anyway. Unless they're a jerk - but even then, I'll try.

I won't go into discussion on 'limitless' or 'boundless' compassion here - I'm just referring to common concern for the sufferings and well-being of your fellow man.

Of such compassion, I do not see any vacuum within the Theravada tradition.


:anjali:
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Hanzze » Wed Oct 06, 2010 10:18 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Individual » Wed Oct 06, 2010 10:19 pm

mikenz66 wrote:Hi Invividual,
Individual wrote:If a crazy homeless man tries to steal food from you, the compassionate thing to do is to repel him by spraying him down with something stinky

Just kidding. Not humans, only insects

And your point is?

Mike

That it is ironic to regard insects as sentient beings along with humans and dogs, yet to regard human hunger as a global crisis, insect hunger as a nuisance or a threat, and dog hunger as something in between.
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 06, 2010 11:00 pm

Hanzze wrote:let me ask you an other question, did you understand thai while you have practiced there?

I understand some Thai, but not enough to discuss Dhamma.

Anyway, it's you who seem to be trying to make some point about how people are misunderstanding karuna in their practise of Dhamma. Until I can understand what that point is I have nothing to add.

:anjali:
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Hanzze » Wed Oct 06, 2010 11:02 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Hanzze » Wed Oct 06, 2010 11:27 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Hanzze » Sat Oct 09, 2010 1:49 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Location: Cambodia

Re: Compassion in the Theravada

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:34 am

retrofuturist wrote:When you understand the causes of suffering and your own experiences with dukkha, you understand also that other people experience similar sufferings too.



I agree - nobody wants to suffer. It seems to me that the greater personal insight we develop into the Noble Truths, the more compassionate we become.

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