Just War and Buddhism

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Re: Just War and Buddhism

Postby cooran » Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:20 am

Heyya kirk,

This is the Dhammic free-for-all forum. Mostly there is nothing particularly dhammic about it. Sometimes, if you are going to post in this forum, it is better just to post the Buddha's teachings and leave it at that, don't argue, or mostly stay in the other sub-forums like most members do. And as for insults, real or perceived - unless you accept them ... they still belong to the person who offered them. Remember the Akkosa sutta.

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: Just War and Buddhism

Postby kirk5a » Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:24 am

Thanks Chris. I think it's reasonable to ask the moderator what he meant with his comment.
"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230
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Re: Just War and Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Jan 08, 2011 3:38 am

kirk5a wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:If it is an insult, then don't accept, but it was hardly meant as such.

No? I took the implication that if others lives were to be dependent upon my choices, I would do nothing to save them or that they would surely come to harm.
Some years ago, being a Good Samaritan, I intervened in a situation which resulted me being attacxked by a knife weilding fellow who was quite intent in putting an unseemly hole or two in me. After the incident, as I played it back in my head, I was realized if I had to, I would have killed him, though during the incident there was no thought of that. There really wasn't much thought at all.

My point is, until you are actually in such a situation, you really do not know what you would do, and I would not wish it upon you or anyoner else. I hope you never find out what you would or would not do.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Just War and Buddhism

Postby clw_uk » Sat Jan 08, 2011 3:48 am

I think a good point would be to view it in terms of laymen and monks and nuns


Monks and nuns have made a dedication to the precepts and to nibbana, with a renouncement of wordly life, for them, killing wouldn't be an option


However laymen, while accepting the Buddha, have only taken the basic precepts and are very much a part of wordly life and being a part of worldly life would mean taking worldly action, in extreme situation, such as in the case of the Third Reich


I can think of a good thought experiment which is quite widely used in ethical philosophy - If you had a time machine, would you go back and kill Hitler as a baby, or as a teenager or at any point before he joined the German Workers' Party?
“ Your mind is likewise blocked. But the right road awaits you still. Cast out your doubts, your fears and your desires, let go of grief and of hope as well, for where these rule , then the mind is their subject." Boetius
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Re: Just War and Buddhism

Postby Virgo » Sat Jan 08, 2011 4:24 am

clw_uk wrote:I think a good point would be to view it in terms of laymen and monks and nuns


Monks and nuns have made a dedication to the precepts and to nibbana, with a renouncement of wordly life, for them, killing wouldn't be an option


However laymen, while accepting the Buddha, have only taken the basic precepts and are very much a part of wordly life and being a part of worldly life would mean taking worldly action, in extreme situation, such as in the case of the Third Reich


I can think of a good thought experiment which is quite widely used in ethical philosophy - If you had a time machine, would you go back and kill Hitler as a baby, or as a teenager or at any point before he joined the German Workers' Party?

Better off than going to hell and encouraging others to go to hell by killing for "defense" to refrain from it and go to heaven for having restraint in such situations, and schooling others on how killing leads to hell, so they can be pacifists too and go to heaven. At least then, a couple of people get a good rebirth out of it instead of none. We are so attached-- so attached to this life; there is so much more.

Kevin
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