The compassionate monkey

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Re: The compassionate monkey

Postby chownah » Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:11 am

I like this story better:

There once was a compassionate farmer who saw an aphid which fell to the ground so he carefully put it up on one of his plants....and then he found another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and having compassion for them all he put them all back onto his plants but then he found another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and being compassinate he put them all back up onto his plants.....but then he noticed another....(insert 200 pages of "and another" here)....then the book ends with the farmer dying of starvation but dieing happily in knowing that his dead body would provide a good life for countless creatures. THE END

Is there a moral here?

chownah
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Re: The compassionate monkey

Postby cooran » Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:45 am

Well …. if they're a variety of Lacewing aphid, maybe advise the farmer to take advantage of the Department of Agricultural Extension (DOAE)’s offer?
‘’Lacewings (Chrysopa sp.) can be mass-reared for use against a variety of pests. In Thailand, the Department of Agricultural Extension (DOAE) has developed rearing facilities and lacewings are made available to farmers for field release.’’
http://thailand.ipm-info.org/natural_en ... ewings.htm

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: The compassionate monkey

Postby Hanzze » Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:57 am

chownah wrote:I like this story better:

There once was a compassionate farmer who saw an aphid which fell to the ground so he carefully put it up on one of his plants....and then he found another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and having compassion for them all he put them all back onto his plants but then he found another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another......and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and another...and being compassinate he put them all back up onto his plants.....but then he noticed another....(insert 200 pages of "and another" here)....then the book ends with the farmer dying of starvation but dieing happily in knowing that his dead body would provide a good life for countless creatures. THE END

Is there a moral here?

chownah

"but dieing happily in knowing that his dead body would provide a good life for countless creatures."
a Buddha to be
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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