Suttas about not moving the body

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Suttas about not moving the body

Postby Dmytro » Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:18 pm

Hello,

Would someone kindly give a reference to sutta(s) about not moving the body in meditative practice?

Thanks in advance,
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Re: Suttas about not moving the body

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:35 pm

What about the Samaññaphala Sutta?
But when the king was not far from the mango grove, he was gripped with fear, trepidation, his hair standing on end. Fearful, agitated, his hair standing on end, he said to Jivaka Komarabhacca: "Friend Jivaka, you aren't deceiving me, are you? You aren't betraying me, are you? You aren't turning me over to my enemies, are you? How can there be such a large community of monks — 1,250 in all — with no sound of sneezing, no sound of coughing, no voices at all?"
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Re: Suttas about not moving the body

Postby cooran » Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:19 pm

Hello Dymtro,

[10] "And what is mindfulness of in-&-out breathing? There is the case where a monk — having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — sits down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect, and setting mindfulness to the fore. Always mindful, he breathes in; mindful he breathes out.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

This is the only subject of meditation for which the Buddha has recommended a definite posture, and it seems encompass the idea that movement ought to be kept to a bare minimum, as any movement would alter the posture.

metta
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Re: Suttas about not moving the body

Postby Paññāsikhara » Fri Dec 03, 2010 11:52 am

Dmytro wrote:Hello,

Would someone kindly give a reference to sutta(s) about not moving the body in meditative practice?

Thanks in advance,
Dmytro


I would recommend checking out some of Bronkhorst's writings where he compares Buddhist practices to those of the other sramana movements, such as the Jainas. The latter had a big emphasis on "no movement" in the physical sense. One could reference those terms to Buddhist texts.
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Re: Suttas about not moving the body

Postby Sanghamitta » Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:38 pm

Paññāsikhara wrote:
Dmytro wrote:Hello,

Would someone kindly give a reference to sutta(s) about not moving the body in meditative practice?

Thanks in advance,
Dmytro


I would recommend checking out some of Bronkhorst's writings where he compares Buddhist practices to those of the other sramana movements, such as the Jainas. The latter had a big emphasis on "no movement" in the physical sense. One could reference those terms to Buddhist texts.

Why....?
He has already been given good answers that correspond to the Theravada in this Classical Theravada Sub Forum.
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Re: Suttas about not moving the body

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Dec 03, 2010 6:46 pm

Sanghamitta wrote:Why....?
He has already been given good answers that correspond to the Theravada in this Classical Theravada Sub Forum.

It's true that this section is "Classical Theravada". However, in the same way as, for example, Gombrich's analyses of what exactly the Buddha was disagreeing (or agreeing) with in his discourses, the comparison might be interesting. We have an Early Buddhism section specifically for such discussion:
viewforum.php?f=29

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