Nibbana as Khandha-Vimutti

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Bakmoon
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Nibbana as Khandha-Vimutti

Postby Bakmoon » Sun Jan 20, 2013 9:39 am

I remember hearing somewhere that Nibbana is described as being "liberated from the aggregates" or Khandha-Vimutti, but I don't know where exactly that is said, and would like to be able to cite it. Is that in a Sutta, a Commentary, or somewhere else, and could someone cite the passage and possibly quote it for me please?
The non-doing of any evil,
The performance of what's skillful,
The cleansing of one's own mind:
This is the Buddhas' teaching.

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Cittasanto
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Re: Nibbana as Khandha-Vimutti

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:00 am

Bakmoon wrote:I remember hearing somewhere that Nibbana is described as being "liberated from the aggregates" or Khandha-Vimutti, but I don't know where exactly that is said, and would like to be able to cite it. Is that in a Sutta, a Commentary, or somewhere else, and could someone cite the passage and possibly quote it for me please?

All that comes to mind is the kāyasakkhi (Body Witness). see MN70

unless you are thinking of the Parinibbana of an arahant who is then released from the Khandha fully, I am not sure, the search didn't render anything in the canon anyway that I could immediately see.
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