What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"?

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EmptyCittas1by1
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What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"?

Postby EmptyCittas1by1 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 12:02 am

"Eat little! Sleep little! Speak little! Whatever it may be of worldly habit, lessen them, go against their power. Don't just do as you like, don't indulge in your thought. Stop this slavish following. You must constantly go against the stream of ignorance. This is called "Discipline." When you discipline your heart, it becomes very dissatisfied and begins to struggle. It becomes restricted and oppressed. When the heart is prevented from doing what it wants to do, it starts wandering and struggling. Suffering becomes apparent to us."

— Ajahn Chah

santa100
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Re: What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"

Postby santa100 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 2:21 am

The four modes of continuous oppression are defined on the previous page 667 in footnote #3.

About the pain of sensual pleasures, since we're still un-enlightened beings, we're still subjected to the "four perversions" as described in AN 4.49 ( http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html ). Also refer to the leper analogy in MN 75 ( http://suttacentral.net/mn75/en ) who, due to the disease, continues to scratch his open wounds with his nails, or causterise his body over a burning charcoal pit to "feel" better. For the leper, the only way to get to the truth is to take the "doctor"'s medicines to be completely cured, not to dwell on some illusional make-believe about his state.

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EmptyCittas1by1
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Re: What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"

Postby EmptyCittas1by1 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 3:53 am

"Eat little! Sleep little! Speak little! Whatever it may be of worldly habit, lessen them, go against their power. Don't just do as you like, don't indulge in your thought. Stop this slavish following. You must constantly go against the stream of ignorance. This is called "Discipline." When you discipline your heart, it becomes very dissatisfied and begins to struggle. It becomes restricted and oppressed. When the heart is prevented from doing what it wants to do, it starts wandering and struggling. Suffering becomes apparent to us."

— Ajahn Chah

santa100
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Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:55 pm

Re: What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"

Postby santa100 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 5:35 am

The Three Characteristics are: impermanence(anicca), suffering(dukkha), and not-self(anatta). Notice that the rendering of dukkha as "suffering" or "unsatisfactoriness" is probably better than "pain" (as Ven. Nanamoli used in the Vism. translation) for it's much deeper than simple painful or pleasant feelings. So for example, if we substitute "pain" with "unsatisfactoriness", it'll make it easier for us to see that sensual pleasures are "unsatisfactory" because of the continuous "sense of burning oppression". Ever heard of that common phrase "burning with desire"? So, there's no contradiction between Vism. and the suttas afterall.

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EmptyCittas1by1
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Re: What does by Buddhaghosa mean by "continuous oppression"

Postby EmptyCittas1by1 » Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:28 pm

"Eat little! Sleep little! Speak little! Whatever it may be of worldly habit, lessen them, go against their power. Don't just do as you like, don't indulge in your thought. Stop this slavish following. You must constantly go against the stream of ignorance. This is called "Discipline." When you discipline your heart, it becomes very dissatisfied and begins to struggle. It becomes restricted and oppressed. When the heart is prevented from doing what it wants to do, it starts wandering and struggling. Suffering becomes apparent to us."

— Ajahn Chah


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