Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:58 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Kim OHara » Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:06 pm

Hanzze wrote:back to topic with:

People with courage and character always seem sinister to the rest.
Hermann Hesse

Mother Teresa? Sinister??????????
:jawdrop:

Kim
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:08 pm

Just saw that he also likes trees:

"For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow.

Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.

A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. The attempt and the risk that the eternal mother took with me is unique, unique the form and veins of my skin, unique the smallest play of leaves in my branches and the smallest scar on my bark. I was made to form and reveal the eternal in my smallest special detail.

A tree says: My strength is trust. I know nothing about my fathers, I know nothing about the thousand children that every year spring out of me. I live out the secret of my seed to the very end, and I care for nothing else. I trust that God is in me. I trust that my labor is holy. Out of this trust I live.

When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! Be still! Look at me! Life is not easy, life is not difficult. Those are childish thoughts. Let God speak within you, and your thoughts will grow silent. You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all.

A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. If one listens to them silently for a long time, this longing reveals its kernel, its meaning. It is not so much a matter of escaping from one's suffering, though it may seem to be so. It is a longing for home, for a memory of the mother, for new metaphors for life. It leads home. Every path leads homeward, every step is birth, every step is death, every grave is mother.

So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness."
Hermann Hesse
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:10 pm

"When someone is seeking,” said Siddartha, “It happens quite easily that he only sees the thing that he is seeking; that he is unable to find anything, unable to absorb anything, because he is only thinking of the thing he is seeking, because he has a goal, because he is obsessed with his goal. Seeking means: to have a goal; but finding means: to be free, to be receptive, to have no goal. You, O worthy one, are perhaps indeed a seeker, for in striving towards your goal, you do not see many things that are under your nose."
— Hermann Hesse (Siddhartha)
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:19 pm

Like a modern day Jataka Tale...

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:03 pm

Annapurna wrote:Ouch....

;) Since when are poets "right" or "wrong", Sir Tilt?
When they make truth claims.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:05 pm

Hanzze wrote:It could be the translation as Hesse was not a native english speaker.
Probably is still drivel in it its native German.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:18 pm

Assiduous and busy, care-ridden and light-hearted, intelligent and yet thoughtless, these butterflies lived a life at once childlike and raffiné; independent, not to be bought by every one, finding their account in good luck and fine weather, in love with life and yet clinging to it far less than the bourgeois, always ready to follow a fairy prince to his castle, always certain, though scarcely conscious of it, that a difficult and sad end was in store for them."
— Hermann Hesse (Siddhartha)
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:28 pm

Hanzze wrote:Good morning tiltbillings :-)

I guess that makes you a real good day:
Nope, haven't ever been a day as far as I can remember.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby andre9999 » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:34 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
Hanzze wrote:Good morning tiltbillings :-)

I guess that makes you a real good day:
Nope, haven't ever been a day as far as I can remember.


There is no self to be a day.
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:36 pm

andrer9999 wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:
Hanzze wrote:Good morning tiltbillings :-)

I guess that makes you a real good day:
Nope, haven't ever been a day as far as I can remember.


There is no self to be a day.
Oh, happy day.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:44 pm

"...inasmuch as every man takes the sufferings that fall to his share as the greatest."
— Hermann Hesse (Steppenwolf)
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:50 pm

Hanzze wrote:"...inasmuch as every man takes the sufferings that fall to his share as the greatest."
— Hermann Hesse (Steppenwolf)
One's suffering does tend to be rather important to one, but I think "every man" is also quite capable of empathy, recognizing that the suffering next door could be a great deal worse.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Tue Jan 18, 2011 11:59 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:04 am

Hanzze wrote:Are you sure? Me not, I think it is the same problem with wisdom. Suffers more, suffers less - knows more knows less ...
Oh, dear. You have been reading way too much Hesse.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:09 am

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:12 am

Hanzze wrote:So what do you think? Are you suffering more as I? Or I am wiser as you?
Damdifino, since I can not see you, hear you, but I do see others whose suffering is far greater than mine. It is a basic human trait.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby Hanzze » Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:18 am

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:04 am

Hanzze wrote:What makes you believe that somebody else is suffering more than you?
What makes you think they are not? Are you so bereft of empathy, compassion that you would ask such a question?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Siddhartha (novel) & Herman Hesse

Postby alan » Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:03 am

Hi meindzai. I also read Alan Watts as a teen and oh boy did I think he had it all figured out. He was my hero for a year or two. Embarrassing to admit it now...but it did inspire me on towards more serious study later. There must be some value in that.

Sorry, no Hesse quotes. Back to you, Hanzze.
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