Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

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Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Sun Mar 06, 2011 2:10 am

As many of you know, a large number of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma Talks have been translated and are available online. Which of these have you found most interesting, insightful and/or inspiring? I thought it might be helpful to have a discussion thread where we can talk about Ajahn Chah's teachings, share passages from talks and stories about Ajahn Chah, ask questions and gain a deeper understanding of his insights into the Dhamma. So basically anything that relates to his life would be on topic here, with the online talks providing a central anchor for our discussion.

:group:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby bodom » Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:52 am

Far and away the most inspirational Dhamma teacher to my practice. Though I never met the man, reading his words lights a fire under me too practice like no other. For me, his words are next only to the Budddhas own.

Thanks for starting this thread Chris I look forward to contributing.

About this mind... In truth there is nothing really wrong with it. It is intrinsically pure. Within itself it's already peaceful. That the mind is not peaceful these days is because it follows moods. The real mind doesn't have anything to it, it is simply (an aspect of) Nature. It becomes peaceful or agitated because moods deceive it. The untrained mind is stupid. Sense impressions come and trick it into happiness, suffering, gladness and sorrow, but the mind's true nature is none of those things. That gladness or sadness is not the mind, but only a mood coming to deceive us. The untrained mind gets lost and follows these things, it forgets itself. Then we think that it is we who are upset or at ease or whatever.

But really this mind of ours is already unmoving and peaceful... really peaceful! Just like a leaf which is still as long as no wind blows. If a wind comes up the leaf flutters. The fluttering is due to the wind — the "fluttering" is due to those sense impressions; the mind follows them. If it doesn't follow them, it doesn't "flutter." If we know fully the true nature of sense impressions we will be unmoved.

Our practice is simply to see the Original Mind. So we must train the mind to know those sense impressions, and not get lost in them. To make it peaceful. Just this is the aim of all this difficult practice we put ourselves through.


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... .html#mind

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Sun Mar 06, 2011 4:10 am

Thanks so much for responding, bodom. Those passages are brilliant.
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby bodom » Mon Mar 07, 2011 12:39 am

Traditionally the Eightfold Path is taught with eight steps such as Right Understanding, Right Speech, Right Concentration, and so forth. But the true Eightfold Path is within us-two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, a tongue, and a body. These eight doors are our entire Path and the mind is the one that walks on the Path. Know these doors, examine them, and all the dhammas will be revealed.

The heart of the path is so simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice.

Do not try to become anything. Do no make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing.

Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this-just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle.

Why not give it a try? Do you dare? - Achaan Chah


http://www.what-buddha-taught.net/Books ... t_Pool.htm

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:01 am



:smile:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby kirk5a » Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:27 pm

bodom wrote:Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this-just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle.

Why not give it a try? Do you dare? - Achaan Chah


Do I dare? That's a curious question. It doesn't sound too intimidating... I wonder if he was suggesting if we dare to give up our attachment to meditation techniques?

There's a story somewhere about Ajahn Sumedho, during a winter retreat, insist that the monks stop meditating. Hm, just posting that does sound radical, maybe it is rather daring.

Found it here: p. 57 http://www.abhayagiri.org/main/book/8/

From that time on, Ajahn Sumedho began to emphasize the same
principle: “Stop meditating.” Particularly at the beginning of the retreat,
he would talk repeatedly about being enlightened, rather than becoming
enlightened. “It is not about doing something now to become enlightened in the future.This is totally wrong. This kind of thinking is bound
up with self and time. Be awake now; be enlightened to the present moment.”
"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby Nyana » Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:55 pm

bodom wrote:
But the true Eightfold Path is within us-two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, a tongue, and a body. These eight doors are our entire Path and the mind is the one that walks on the Path. Know these doors, examine them, and all the dhammas will be revealed.

The heart of the path is so simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice.

Do not try to become anything. Do no make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing.

I first read this passage (or one very much like it) many years ago in A Still Forest Pool. A very memorable instruction.

All the best,

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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Tue Mar 08, 2011 1:54 am

Yes. Simple but clear and very helpful.
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:48 am

This is an excellent Dhamma Talk, imo...

Sammā Samādhi - Detachment Within Activity

Excerpts:

The Buddha's teaching can only enable us to get an initial understanding of the Dhamma, but the Dhamma is not yet within our hearts. Why not? Because we haven't yet practiced, we haven't yet taught ourselves. The Dhamma arises at the practice. If you know it, you know it through the practice. If you doubt it, you doubt it at the practice. Teachings from the Masters may be true, but simply listening to Dhamma is not yet enough to enable us to realize it. The teaching simply points out the way to realize. To realize the Dhamma we must take that teaching and bring it into our hearts. That part which is for the body we apply to the body, that part which is for the speech we apply to the speech, and that part which is for the mind we apply to the mind. This means that after hearing the teaching we must further teach ourselves to know that Dhamma, to be that Dhamma.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Before we can give up defilements we must change our perspective. We must begin to practice rightly and practice well. Previously we didn't practice rightly or well, and yet we thought we were right and good just the same. When we really look into the matter we upright ourselves, just like turning over one's hand. This means that the ''one who knows,'' or wisdom, arises in the mind, so that it is able to see things anew. A new kind of awareness arises.

Therefore cultivators must practice to develop this knowing, which we call Buddho, the one who knows, in their minds. Originally the one who knows is not there, our knowledge is not clear, true or complete. This knowledge is therefore too weak to train the mind. But then the mind changes, or inverts, as a result of this awareness, called wisdom or insight, which exceeds our previous awareness. That previous ''one who knows'' did not yet know fully and so was unable to bring us to our objective.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

When the Buddha really looked into the matter he saw that practice is not a concern of the body, it is a concern of the mind. Attakilamathānuyogo (self-mortification) - the Buddha had tried it and found that it was limited to the body. In fact, all Buddhas are enlightened in mind. Whether in regard to the body or to the mind, just throw them all together as transient, imperfect and ownerless - aniccam, dukkham and anattā. They are simply conditions of nature. They arise depending on supporting factors, exist for a while and then cease. When there are appropriate conditions they arise again; having arisen they exist for a while, then cease once more. These things are not a ''self,'' a ''being,'' an ''us'' or a ''them.'' There's nobody there, simply feelings. Happiness has no intrinsic self, suffering has no intrinsic self. No self can be found, there are simply elements of nature which arise, exist and cease. They go through this constant cycle of change.

All beings, including humans, tend to see the arising as themselves, the existence as themselves, and the cessation as themselves. Thus they cling to everything. They don't want things to be the way they are, they don't want them to be otherwise. For instance, having arisen they don't want things to cease; having experienced happiness, they don't want suffering. If suffering does arise they want it to go away as quickly as possible, but even better if it doesn't arise at all. This is because they see this body and mind as themselves, or belonging to themselves, and so they demand those things to follow their wishes.

This sort of thinking is like building a dam or a dike without making an outlet to let the water through. The result is that the dam bursts. And so it is with this kind of thinking. The Buddha saw that thinking in this way is the cause of suffering. Seeing this cause, the Buddha gave it up. This is the Noble Truth of the cause of suffering. The truths of suffering, its cause, its cessation and the way leading to that cessation... people are stuck right here. If people are to overcome their doubts it's right at this point. Seeing that these things are simply rūpa and nāma, or corporeality and mentality, it becomes obvious that they are not a being, a person, an ''us,'' or a ''them.'' They simply follow the laws of nature.

Our practice is to know things in this way. We don't have the power to really control these things, we aren't really their owners. Trying to control them causes suffering, because they aren't really ours to control. Neither body nor mind are self or others. If we know this as it really is then we see clearly. We see the truth, we are at one with it. It's like seeing a lump of red hot iron which has been heated in a furnace. It's hot all over. Whether we touch it on top, the bottom or the sides it's hot. No matter where we touch it, it's hot. This is how you should see things.

Mostly when we start to practice we want to attain, to achieve, to know and to see, but we don't yet know what it is we're going to achieve or know. There was once a disciple of mine whose practice was plagued with confusion and doubts. But he kept practicing, and I kept instructing him, till he began to find some peace. But when he eventually became a bit calm he got caught up in his doubts again, saying, ''What do I do next?'' There! The confusion arises again. He says he wants peace but when he gets it, he doesn't want it, he asks what he should do next!

So in this practice we must do everything with detachment. How are we to detach? We detach by seeing things clearly. Know the characteristics of the body and mind as they are. We meditate in order to find peace, but in doing so we see that which is not peaceful. This is because movement is the nature of the mind.



:anjali:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby Aloka » Wed Mar 09, 2011 6:49 pm

Hi Bodom,

Would it be possible to give links or references to the source of your quotes, please?


With kind wishes,

Aloka :anjali:
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby bodom » Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:25 pm

Aloka wrote:Hi Bodom,

Would it be possible to give links or references to the source of your quotes, please?


With kind wishes,

Aloka :anjali:


Hi Aloka

I edited my posts to include the sources.

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby old dead wood » Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:17 pm

christopher::: wrote: So basically anything that relates to his life would be on topic here, with the online talks providing a central anchor for our discussion.



From all the reports, Ajahn Chah was a wonderful teacher, as are / were many others that we've listened to, read of, and heard about.
It would be interesting to find out if anyone could tell how mindful Ajahn Chah was able to remain at the time of his stroke. Was he able to let go of the suffering and not be taken by surprise by such a radical change in mental functioning ? I remember Ram Dass said something to the effect that his practice was a bit overpowered at the time of his stroke (did he mention that he "failed"?). I know other advanced practitioners far superior to me that suffered just like regular human beings via stroke, disability, and depression. This is where the rubber meets the road. Can practice be effective at times like this, can ANYONE let go of overpowering pain, suffering, fear, and depression instantly, or is it always a flawed human long-term adjusting process, no matter HOW "advanced" someone is ?
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:21 am

I don't know anything about Ajahn Chah's final years. Perhaps someone else has knowledge of that. It's possible that even a highly awakened person might have difficulties if they had a stroke or something like Alzheimer’s disease. But the wisdom of Dhamma doesn't change, it's still effective - as long as one is able to practice. I think we can trust in that. Hopefully, in such situations the mental habits and practices of decades will kick in automatically and suffering will not be as great as it would have been if one had never practiced. And if not, there may be karmic reasons for that. In my view "the rubber meets the road" every single day, in every moment of our lives. Even if we knew that there were rare situations where the Dhamma may be less effective, is that a reason to stop practicing?
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Wed May 11, 2011 3:39 am

Excerpt from another excellent dhamma talk by Ajahn Chah, both insightful and challenging, imo...


"With even a little intuitive wisdom, we will then be able to see clearly through the ways of the world. We will come to understand that everything in the world is a teacher. Trees and vines, for example, can all reveal the true nature of reality. With wisdom there is no need to question anyone, no need to study. We can learn from nature enough to be enlightened, as in the story of King Mahajanaka, because everything follows the way of truth. It does not diverge from truth.

Associated with wisdom are self-composure and restraint which, in turn, can lead to further insight into the ways of nature. In this way, we will come to know the ultimate truth of everything being ''anicca-dukkha-anattā''. Take trees, for example; all trees upon the earth are equal, are One, when seen through the reality of ''anicca-dukkha-anattā''. First, they come into being, then grow and mature, constantly changing, until they finally die as every tree must.

In the same way, people and animals are born, grow and change during their life-times until they eventually die. The multitudinous changes which occur during this transition from birth to death show the Way of Dhamma. That is to say, all things are impermanent, having decay and dissolution as their natural condition.

If we have awareness and understanding, if we study with wisdom and mindfulness, we will see Dhamma as reality. Thus, we sill see people as constantly being born, changing and finally passing away. Everyone is subject to the cycle of birth and death, and because of this, everyone in the universe is as One being. Thus, seeing one person clearly and distinctly is the same as seeing every person in the world.

In the same way, everything is Dhamma. Not only the things we see with our physical eye, but also the things we see in our minds. A thought arises, then changes and passes away. It is ''nāma dhamma'', simply a mental impression that arises and passes away. This is the real nature of the mind. Altogether, this is the noble truth of Dhamma. If one doesn't look and observe in this way, one doesn't really see! If one does see, one will have the wisdom to listen to the Dhamma as proclaimed by the Buddha.

Where is the Buddha?
The Buddha is in the Dhamma.
Where is the Dhamma?
The Dhamma is in the Buddha.
Right here, now!
Where is the Sangha?
The Sangha is in the Dhamma.


The Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha exist in our minds, but we have to see it clearly. Some people just pick this up casually saying, ''Oh! The Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha exist in my mind''. Yet their own practice is not suitable or appropriate. It is thus not befitting that the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha should be found in their minds, namely, because the ''mind'' must first be that mind which knows the Dhamma.

Bringing everything back to this point of Dhamma, we will come to know that, in the world, truth does exist, and thus it is possible for us to practice to realize it. For instance, ''nāma dhamma'', feelings, thoughts, imagination, etc., are all uncertain. When anger arises, it grows and changes and finally disappears. Happiness, too, arises, grows and changes and finally disappears. They are empty. They are not any ''thing''. This is always the way of all things, both mentally and materially. Internally, there are this body and mind. Externally, there are trees, vines and all manner of things which display this universal law of uncertainty.

Whether a tree, a mountain or an animal, it's all Dhamma, everything is Dhamma. Where is this Dhamma? Speaking simply, that which is not Dhamma doesn't exist. Dhamma is nature. This is called the ''Sacca Dhamma'', the True Dhamma. If one sees nature, one sees Dhamma; if one sees Dhamma, one sees nature. Seeing nature, one know the Dhamma.

And so, what is the use of a lot of study when the ultimate reality of life, in its every moment, in its every act, is just an endless cycle of births and deaths? If we are mindful and clearly aware when in all postures (sitting, standing, walking, lying), then self-knowledge is ready to be born; that is, knowing the truth of Dhamma already in existence right here and now.

At present, the Buddha, the real Buddha, is still living, for He is the Dhamma itself, the ''Sacca Dhamma''. And ''Sacca Dhamma'', that which enables one to become Buddha, still exists. It hasn't fled anywhere! It gives rise to two Buddhas: one in body and the other in mind.

''The real Dhamma'', the Buddha told Ananda, ''can only be realized through practice''. Whoever sees the Buddha, sees the Dhamma. And how is this? Previously, no Buddha existed; it was only when Siddhattha Gotama realized the Dhamma that he became the Buddha. If we explain it in this way, then He is the same as us. If we realize the Dhamma, then we will likewise be the Buddha. This is called the Buddha in mind or ''Nāma Dhamma''.

We must be mindful of everything we do, for we become the inheritors of our own good or evil actions. In doing good, we reap good. In doing evil, we reap evil. All you have to do is look into your everyday lives to know that this is so. Siddhattha Gotama was enlightened to the realization of this truth, and this gave rise to the appearance of a Buddha in the world. Likewise, if each and every person practices to attain to this truth, then they, too, will change to be Buddha."

~Ajahn Chah
Dhamma Nature


Image



"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby Alex123 » Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:08 pm

christopher::: wrote:Excerpt from another excellent dhamma talk by Ajahn Chah, both insightful and challenging, imo...

"With even a little intuitive wisdom, we will then be able to see clearly through the ways of the world. We will come to understand that everything in the world is a teacher. Trees and vines, for example, can all reveal the true nature of reality. With wisdom there is no need to question anyone, no need to study. We can learn from nature enough to be enlightened, as in the story of King Mahajanaka, because everything follows the way of truth. It does not diverge from truth.


I like Ven. Ajahn Chah very much, and have four books of his wonderful teachings. The thing is that I have somewhat of a difficulty in understanding the above challenging teaching. I wonder how far this should be taken, and whether it is said in a very specific context.

Some people despite their advanced age, did not learn much, at least not a lot of Dhamma. So amount of pure and natural experience is not by itself a teacher. Sometimes some people have learned violent and aggressive things from nature. "It is a dog eat dog world. The Law of the Jungle, the fittest survive".
Some have learned deadly moves by imitating wildlife like snake, crane, tiger, monkey, etc... There are very deadly and vicious Kung Fu styles based on some animals. Some people have learned special moves like "monkey steals the peach" from monkeys, for example.


So I guess that certain amount of learning, wisdom and wholesome qualities is required in order to be able to learn proper Dhamma from nature.
I was not; I was; I am not; I do not care."
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby PeterB » Wed Jun 01, 2011 9:42 pm

When reading ANYTHING attributed to Ajahn Chah it is worth remembering that he wrote nothing. That his talks are edited versions of translations . And that he addressed the person or persons who were in front of him at the time...
It is therefore possible to find passages in which he appears to contradict himself....he isn't.
His remarks were specific to that person in those circumstances.
Given that he had a teacher and many scores of students he was certainly not saying that a human teacher was unneccessary.
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Jun 01, 2011 10:17 pm

I agree,

I've been reading "The Island" by Ajahns Passano and Amaro, and they throw in a few long passages from Ajahn Chah from which it is clear that he had plenty of book knowledge of the Pali terminology. He just didn't always express it that way...

:anjali:
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 01, 2011 10:49 pm

mikenz66 wrote:I agree,

I've been reading "The Island" by Ajahns Passano and Amaro, and they throw in a few long passages from Ajahn Chah from which it is clear that he had plenty of book knowledge of the Pali terminology. He just didn't always express it that way...

:anjali:
Mike


Excellent, excellent book!

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby christopher::: » Thu Jun 02, 2011 12:11 am

Concerning these ideas about learning from Nature and all things being a teacher- it may make more sense if seen in the context of many lifetimes of practice, usually involving human teachers and contact with more explicit dhamma teachings. On the other hand, if we observe the Natural world carefully i think one can get a glimpse of what Ajahn Chah was talking about.
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Ajahn Chah's Life & Dhamma Teachings

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 02, 2011 12:27 am

christopher::: wrote:On the other hand, if we observe the Natural world carefully i think one can get a glimpse of what Ajahn Chah was talking about.


See especially this talk:

Dhamma Nature
http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Dhamma_Nature1.php

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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