Pali: MN 44. Cuu.lavedalla Sutta (8) (b)

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Pali: MN 44. Cuu.lavedalla Sutta (8) (b)

Postby yawares » Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:46 am

Dear members who love Pali,

:candle: MN 44. Cuu.lavedalla Sutta (8) (b) :candle:
[Presented by Dr.Han Tun,MD @sariputtadhamma/JTN]

Han Tun: In my last post, I had mentioned that I am interested in the underlying tendency
to lust that does not have to be abandoned in regard to all pleasant feeling;
the underlying tendency to aversion that does not have to be abandoned in regard
to all painful feeling; and the underlying tendency to ignorance that does not
have to be abandoned in regard to all neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling. And
as Bhikkhu Bodhi had made reference to MN 137, I am now looking at that sutta.

--------------------

MN 137 Sa.laayatanavibhanga Sutta is the Exposition of the Sixfold Base. The
Buddha expounds the six internal and external sense bases and other related
topics. I do not find much about latent tendencies, but I find some useful
information about

(i) six kinds of joy based on the household life (gehasita somanassa),
(ii) six kinds of joy based on renunciation (nekkhammasita somanassa),
(iii) six kinds of grief based on the household life (gehasita domanassa),
(iv) six kinds of grief based on renunciation (nekkhammasita domanassa),
(v) six kinds of equanimity based on the household life (gehasita upekkhaa),
(vi) six kinds of equanimity based on renunciation (nekkhammasita upekkhaa).

They are like the three pairs of vedanaa that I find in MN 10 Satipa.t.thaana Sutta: worldly pleasant feeling (saamisa sukha vedanaa), unworldly pleasant feeling (niraamisa sukha vedanaa), etc.

However, one interesting feature that I find is the following passage in MN
44.28 as well as in MN 137.13.

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"kudaassu naamaaha.m tadaayatana.m upasampajja viharissaami yadariyaa etarahi
aayatana.m upasampajja viharantii"ti? Iti anuttaresu vimokkhesu piha.m
upa.t.thaapayato uppajjati pihaappaccayaa domanassa.m.

"When shall I enter upon and abide in that base that the noble ones now enter
upon and abide in?" In one who generates thus a longing for the supreme
liberations, grief arises with that longing as condition.

----------

Han: This is the kind of grief (domanassa) that arises in a monk who wanted to
become an Arahant, and who tried very hard to achieve it, but still could not
attain it. For me, I cannot aim for Arahantship. But if I had wanted to become a
Sotaapanna in this very life, and if I tried very hard for that, and yet if I
could not attain it, and if I cried for that failure, then my tears would be an
indication of grief based on longing for liberation as condition (vimokkhesu
pihaappaccayaa domanassa).

On more simple terms, if a young man is crying with grief because his parents do
not allow him to become a bhikkhu, or if a young woman is crying with grief
because her parents do not allow her to become a nun, this kind of grief based
on renunciation (nekkhammasita domanassa) need not be abandoned.
****** :anjali:
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:
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