Charging Money For the Dhamma

A forum for beginners and members of other Buddhist traditions to ask questions about Theravāda (The Way of the Elders). Responses require moderator approval before they are visible.
User avatar
Kamran
Posts: 196
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:14 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1006

Charging Money For the Dhamma

Postby Kamran » Sun Aug 19, 2012 4:30 pm

Some of the books I am interested in reading are only available for sale and I am interested to know what others think of charging for the dhamma. Below is a relevant quote I found. Thanks.

Ajahn Thanissaro – No Donation Required

“How can I ever repay you for your teaching?” Meditation teachers often hear this question from their students, and the best answer I know is one that my teacher, Ajahn Fuang, gave every time: “By being intent on practicing.”

Each time he gave this answer, I was struck by how noble and gracious it was. And it wasn’t just a formality. He never pressured his students for donations. Even when our monastery was poor, he never acted poor, never tried to take advantage of their gratitude and trust. He was living a tradition in which, as he often put it, we weren’t reduced to hirelings, and the act of teaching the dharma was purely dana, purely a gift.....

Donors, for instance, should not see their gifts to monastics as payment for teachings. That would turn the gift into wages, and deprive it of its potential to gladden the mind. Monastics, in return, shouldn’t pressure the donor in any way, even with hints about what they’d like to receive. When asked where a prospective gift should be given, they’re told to say, “Give wherever your gift would be used, or would be well cared for, or would last long, or wherever your mind feels inspired.” This conveys a sense of trust in the donor’s discernment—itself a gift that gladdens the mind.

The same principles apply to the gift of dharma. The Buddha insisted that dharma be taught without expectation of material reward, perhaps because the best way to teach generosity is by being generous with the most valuable thing you have: the dharma itself


http://www.theravada-dhamma.org/blog/?p=8823
When this concentration is thus developed, thus well developed by you, then wherever you go, you will go in comfort. Wherever you stand, you will stand in comfort. Wherever you sit, you will sit in comfort. Wherever you lie down, you will lie down in comfort.

User avatar
David N. Snyder
Site Admin
Posts: 8310
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 1001
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Contact:

Re: Charging Money For the Dhamma

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun Aug 19, 2012 4:42 pm


User avatar
manas
Posts: 2192
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 3:04 am
Which number is larger than 1000 and less than 1002: 6
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Charging Money For the Dhamma

Postby manas » Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:36 am

There is a difference between charging for Dhamma instruction - which would be abhorrent - and charging for a book to cover the cost of paper, printing, etc, is there not?

:anjali:


Return to “Discovering Theravāda”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine