Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

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Re: Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

Postby phil » Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:20 am

Thanks for the comments and references, all. I suppose it's because my hindrances are so very strong that I have a less than intensive attitude towards meditation. I do meditate every morning, but the purpose is to support sila. (I find that having a meditation object that I can return to easily during the day conditions patience in various situations in which an akusala response is likely otherwise.) The other day someone posted about having trouble with a flickering eyelid and I thought, man, if that's your biggest concern. So for people out there whose hindrances or environmental circumstances do not permit an intensive meditation practice, don't worry, you can still be a devoted follower of the Buddha by following the precepts and developing awareness of mind states in daily life. (Which I guess can be called "satipatthana." or "guarding the sense doors.") My life is so very entirely devoted to the Dhamma, I feel that, but my meditation is very slack, more like a kind of feel-good yoga. But I will not accept being told that I am a non-practising Buddhist, I mean, water off my back, honestly.
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)
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Re: Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

Postby bodom » Sat Feb 19, 2011 2:55 pm

phil wrote:Thanks for the comments and references, all. I suppose it's because my hindrances are so very strong that I have a less than intensive attitude towards meditation. I do meditate every morning, but the purpose is to support sila. (I find that having a meditation object that I can return to easily during the day conditions patience in various situations in which an akusala response is likely otherwise.) The other day someone posted about having trouble with a flickering eyelid and I thought, man, if that's your biggest concern. So for people out there whose hindrances or environmental circumstances do not permit an intensive meditation practice, don't worry, you can still be a devoted follower of the Buddha by following the precepts and developing awareness of mind states in daily life. (Which I guess can be called "satipatthana." or "guarding the sense doors.") My life is so very entirely devoted to the Dhamma, I feel that, but my meditation is very slack, more like a kind of feel-good yoga. But I will not accept being told that I am a non-practising Buddhist, I mean, water off my back, honestly.


Let us not forget that there are two kinds of Eightfold Path: the "mundane," practiced by the "worldling" and the "supramundane," practiced by the "Noble Ones."

Buddha’s Teaching As It Is –Bhikkhu Bodhi

Lecture 7: Noble Eightfold Path


The Mundane Path

There are two kinds of Noble Eightfold Path. This is an important distinction to remember:

1. The mundane path
2. The supramundane path

The mundane path is developed when we try to purify our discipline,to develop concentration and to arouse insight either in day to day practice or in intensive periods of practice on retreats. The word "mundane" here does here does not mean a worldly path in the ordinary
sense, i.e. a path leading to wealth, fame or worldly success. This mundane path leads to enlightenment, and in fact we have to practice the mundane path to reach the supramundane path. This is called mundane path because even at its highest level of insight
contemplation, it still involves the contemplation of conditioned objects, that is, things included in the five aggregates.

The supramundane path is the direct seeing of Nibbana, the
unconditioned element.

People often mistake the Noble Eightfold Path for a mere path of ethical conduct. They think that as long as they are living within basic framework of morality, they are in accordance with the Noble Eightfold Path. This is not the case. The Noble Eightfold Path is the way leading to the cessation of Dukkha.When we practise the mundane path, our understanding gets deeper and deeper, sharper and sharper and when insight reaches its climax, at some unexpected moment a sudden
radical change can take place.

When wisdom stands at its highest point, if all the faculties of the mind are fully mature and the wish for enlightenment is
strong and steady, then the mind turns away from all conditioned phenomena and focuses on the unconditioned element. That is, the mind breaks through to the realisation of Nibbana. When this happens, all the eight factors of the path rise up simultaneously with great power of penetration,
focussing upon Nibbana. Therefore at this time the eight factors constitute the supramundane path or transcendental path.


http://www.scribd.com/doc/45730208/Noble-Eightfold-Path

:namaste:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

Postby Phra Chuntawongso » Sat Feb 19, 2011 2:57 pm

phil wrote:Thanks for the comments and references, all. I suppose it's because my hindrances are so very strong that I have a less than intensive attitude towards meditation. I do meditate every morning, but the purpose is to support sila. (I find that having a meditation object that I can return to easily during the day conditions patience in various situations in which an akusala response is likely otherwise.) The other day someone posted about having trouble with a flickering eyelid and I thought, man, if that's your biggest concern. So for people out there whose hindrances or environmental circumstances do not permit an intensive meditation practice, don't worry, you can still be a devoted follower of the Buddha by following the precepts and developing awareness of mind states in daily life. (Which I guess can be called "satipatthana." or "guarding the sense doors.") My life is so very entirely devoted to the Dhamma, I feel that, but my meditation is very slack, more like a kind of feel-good yoga. But I will not accept being told that I am a non-practising Buddhist, I mean, water off my back, honestly.

Phil, we are all at different places on the path.
It sounds to me like you are putting in effort where you can and I congratulate you on this.
My suggestion, meditation wise is to try and find some time, perhaps 10 minutes walking followed by 10 minutes sitting,twice a day whenever possible.With practise like this,with time you should find that you start meditating longer.
Sometimes our best meditation sessions are the ones we don't want to do.
Good luck in your practice.
With metta
And crawling on the planets face,some insects called the human race.
Lost in time
Lost in space
And meaning
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Re: Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

Postby phil » Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:44 pm

Phra Chuntawongso wrote:
phil wrote:Thanks for the comments and references, all. I suppose it's because my hindrances are so very strong that I have a less than intensive attitude towards meditation. I do meditate every morning, but the purpose is to support sila. (I find that having a meditation object that I can return to easily during the day conditions patience in various situations in which an akusala response is likely otherwise.) The other day someone posted about having trouble with a flickering eyelid and I thought, man, if that's your biggest concern. So for people out there whose hindrances or environmental circumstances do not permit an intensive meditation practice, don't worry, you can still be a devoted follower of the Buddha by following the precepts and developing awareness of mind states in daily life. (Which I guess can be called "satipatthana." or "guarding the sense doors.") My life is so very entirely devoted to the Dhamma, I feel that, but my meditation is very slack, more like a kind of feel-good yoga. But I will not accept being told that I am a non-practising Buddhist, I mean, water off my back, honestly.

Phil, we are all at different places on the path.
It sounds to me like you are putting in effort where you can and I congratulate you on this.
My suggestion, meditation wise is to try and find some time, perhaps 10 minutes walking followed by 10 minutes sitting,twice a day whenever possible.With practise like this,with time you should find that you start meditating longer.
Sometimes our best meditation sessions are the ones we don't want to do.
Good luck in your practice.
With metta


Thank you kindly, Bhante.

(edit - I removed a description of my meditation practice that need be of no interest to anyone and was irrelevant to the point of this thread, my point in posting was that newcomers to the Dhamma should not feel that Buddhism equals meditation though it is wonderful if they have the inclination and environment for it! And if they do not, it doesn't mean they can't "be Buddhists." By keeping the precepts and being mindful in daily life it is possible to challenge and weaken the power of harmful defilements even without a meditation practice, and that is a fantastic boon to oneself and the people around us.)
Last edited by phil on Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)
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Re: Practising and non-practising Buddhists?

Postby phil » Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:46 pm

Let us not forget that there are two kinds of Eightfold Path: the "mundane," practiced by the "worldling" and the "supramundane," practiced by the "Noble Ones."


Thanks Bodom :smile:
Kammalakkhano , bhikkhave, bālo, kammalakkhano pandito, apadānasobhanī paññāti
(The fool is characterized by his/her actions/the wise one is characterized by his/her actions/Wisdom shines forth in behaviour.)
(AN 3.2 Lakkhana Sutta)
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phil
 
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