who has outflows dried up

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nathan
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Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 3:11 am

who has outflows dried up

Postby nathan » Sun Mar 15, 2009 2:18 pm

what kamma making ends all dhukkha?
what kamma making ends all kamma making?


"Bhikkhus, they do not savor the deathless who do not savor mindfulness of the body; they savor the deathless who savor mindfulness of the body." — A i 45

"A skeleton wrapped up in skin..." — M 82

Bag of Bones A Miscellany on the Body compiled by Bhikkhu Khantipalo
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el271.html
But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

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Cittasanto
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Re: who has outflows dried up

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Mar 15, 2009 9:14 pm

nathan wrote:what kamma making ends all dhukkha?
Noble Eightfold Path
what kamma making ends all kamma making?
Noble Eightfold Path

The Noble Eightfold path is the path leading to the cestation of Dukkha, to Nibbana which is the state of no more Kamma production.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.057.nymo.html
12. "What is neither-dark-nor-bright kamma with neither-dark-nor-bright ripening that leads to the exhaustion of kamma? As to these (three kinds of kamma), any volition in abandoning the kind of kamma that is dark with dark ripening, any volition in abandoning the kind of kamma that is bright with bright ripening, and any volition in abandoning the kind of kamma that is dark-and bright with dark-and-bright ripening: this is called neither-dark-nor-bright kamma with neither-dark-nor-bright ripening.
Blog, Suttas, Aj Chah, Facebook.

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.
John Stuart Mill


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