AN 3.34/AN 3.35 Hatthaka Sutta

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AN 3.34/AN 3.35 Hatthaka Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:15 am

AN 3:35 Hatthaka
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

[Note that the numbering of Suttas in Bhikkhu Bodhi's new AN translation is sometimes different from other translations. This is numbered 3.34 at Access to Insight.]

http://suttacentral.net/an3.35/en/

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Āḷavī on a heap of leaves spread out on a cow track in a siṃsapā grove. Then Hatthaka of Āḷavī, [376] while walking and wandering for exercise, saw the Blessed One sitting there. He then approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to the Blessed One:

“Bhante, did the Blessed One sleep well?”

“Yes, prince, I slept well. I am one of those in the world who sleep well.”

“But, Bhante, the winter nights are cold. It is the eight-day interval, the time when snow falls. [377] The ground trampled by the hooves of cattle is rough, the spread of leaves is thin, the leaves on the tree are sparse, the ochre robes leave one cold, and the gale wind blows cold. Yet the Blessed One says thus: ‘Yes, prince, I slept well. I am one of those in the world who sleep well.’”

“Well then, prince, I will question you about this matter. You should answer as you see fit. What do you think, prince? A householder or a householder’s son might have a house with a peaked roof, plastered inside and out, draft-free, with bolts fastened and shutters closed. There he might have a couch spread with rugs, blankets, and covers, with an excellent covering of antelope hide, with a canopy above and red bolsters at both ends. An oil lamp would be burning and his four wives would serve him in extremely agreeable ways. What do you think, would he sleep well or not, or what do you think about this?”

“He would sleep well, Bhante. He would be one of those in the world who sleep well.”

(1) “What do you think, prince? Might there arise in that householder or householder’s son bodily and mental fevers born of lust, which would torment him so that he would sleep badly?”

“Yes, Bhante.”

“There might arise in that householder or householder’s son bodily and mental fevers born of lust, which would torment him so that he would sleep badly; but the Tathāgata has abandoned such lust, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising. Therefore I have slept well.

(2) “What do you think, prince? Might there arise in that householder or householder’s son bodily and mental fevers born of hatred … (3) … bodily and mental fevers born of delusion, which would torment him so that he would sleep badly?”

“Yes, Bhante.”

“There might arise in that householder or householder’s son bodily and mental fevers born of delusion, which would torment him so that he would sleep badly; but the Tathāgata has abandoned such delusion, cut it off at the root, made it like a palm stump, obliterated it so that it is no more subject to future arising. Therefore I have slept well.”

    He always sleeps well,
    the brahmin who has attained nibbāna,
    cooled off, without acquisitions,
    not tainted by sensual pleasures.

    Having cut off all attachments,
    having removed anguish in the heart,
    the peaceful one sleeps well,
    having attained peace of mind. [378]

Notes

[376] Mp says that he was the son of the king of the state of Āḷavī. On hearing the Buddha teach he became a non-returner. In AN he engages the Buddha in conversation at 3:35 and, with Citta, is held up as a model lay follower at 2:132 and 4:176 §3 as well as at SN 17:23, II 235,20–25. He is praised by the Buddha at 8:23 and 8:24. After his rebirth as a deity, he comes to visit the Buddha at 3:127. The four means of attracting and sustaining others (saṅgahavatthu) are at 4:32.

[377] Antaraṭṭhako himapātanasamayo. Mp: “A period of eight days when snow falls. It is the last four days of the month of Māgha and the first four days of Phagguṇa (roughly in mid-February).

[378] Similar verses are spoken to Anāthapiṇḍika at SN 10:8, I 212
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Re: AN 3.34/AN 3.35 Hatthaka Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 20, 2013 6:33 pm

AN 3.34 PTS: A i 136 Thai 3.35; BJT 3.35
Hatthaka Sutta: To Hatthaka (excerpt)
On Sleeping Well in the Cold Forest
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Is a comfortable home the best guarantee for a good night's sleep?
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Alavi on a spread of leaves by a cattle track in a simsapa forest. Then Hatthaka of Alavi, out roaming & rambling for exercise, saw the Blessed One sitting on a spread of leaves by the cattle track in the simsapa forest. On seeing him, he went to him and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, "Lord, I hope the Blessed One has slept in ease."

"Yes, young man. I have slept in ease. Of those in the world who sleep in ease, I am one."

"But cold, lord, is the winter night. The 'Between-the-Eights'[1] is a time of snowfall. Hard is the ground trampled by cattle hooves. Thin is the spread of leaves. Sparse are the leaves in the trees. Thin are your ochre robes. And cold blows the Verambha wind. Yet still the Blessed One says, 'Yes, young man. I have slept in ease. Of those in the world who sleep in ease, I am one.'"

"In that case, young man, I will question you in return. Answer as you see fit. Now, what do you think: Suppose a householder or householder's son has a house with a gabled roof, plastered inside & out, draft-free, with close-fitting door & windows shut against the wind. Inside he has a horse-hair couch spread with a long-fleeced coverlet, a white wool coverlet, an embroidered coverlet, a rug of kadali-deer hide, with a canopy above, & red cushions on either side. And there a lamp would be burning, and his four wives, with their many charms, would be attending to him. Would he sleep in ease, or not? Or how does this strike you?"

"Yes, lord, he would sleep in ease. Of those in the world who sleep in ease, he would be one."

"But what do you think, young man. Might there arise in that householder or householder's son any bodily fevers or fevers of mind born of passion so that — burned with those passion-born fevers — he would sleep miserably?"

"Yes, lord."

"As for those passion-born fevers — burned with which the householder or householder's son would sleep miserably — that passion has been abandoned by the Tathagata, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Therefore he sleeps in ease.

"Now, what do you think, young man. Might there arise in that householder or householder's son any bodily fevers or fevers of mind born of aversion so that — burned with those aversion-born fevers — he would sleep miserably?"

"Yes, lord."

"As for those aversion-born fevers — burned with which the householder or householder's son would sleep miserably — that aversion has been abandoned by the Tathagata, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Therefore he sleeps in ease.

"Now, what do you think, young man. Might there arise in that householder or householder's son any bodily fevers or fevers of mind born of delusion so that — burned with those delusion-born fevers — he would sleep miserably?"

"Yes, lord."

"As for those delusion-born fevers — burned with which the householder or householder's son would sleep miserably — that delusion has been abandoned by the Tathagata, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Therefore he sleeps in ease.

    "Always, always,
    he sleeps in ease:
    the brahman totally unbound,
    who doesn't adhere
    to sensual pleasures,
    who's without acquisitions
    & cooled.
    Having cut all ties
    & subdued fear in the heart,
    calmed,
    he sleeps in ease,
    having reached peace
    of awareness."

Note

1. The "Between-the-Eights" is a period in February, regarded in northern India as the coldest part of the year.

See also:
SN 10.8; http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
Ud 2.10; http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
Sn 1.2 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
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Re: AN 3.34/AN 3.35 Hatthaka Sutta

Postby jungblood » Sat Nov 23, 2013 12:25 am

Thanks Mikenz for your service in posting these translations... These lessons on the value and power of renunciation are so very pertinent to me today... much appreciated!

many bows,
Lucas
'Renunciation' http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... bl036.html
'Trading candy for gold': http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... candy.html

'The more we really know the Dhamma, the more we can let go. Those who know a little can let go of a little; those who know a lot can let go of a lot.' - Ajaan Lee
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