AN 4.8 Vesārajja : Self-Confidence

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AN 4.8 Vesārajja : Self-Confidence

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Apr 15, 2014 1:56 pm

AN 4.8 AN ii 8 Vesārajja : Self-Confidence
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi


http://suttacentral.net/an4.8/en

"Bhikkhus, there are these four kinds of self-confidence that the Tathāgata has, possessing which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the brahma wheel. [633] What four?

(1) “I do not see any ground on the basis of which an ascetic or brahmin or deva or Māra or Brahmā or anyone in the world might reasonably reprove me, saying: ‘Though you claim to be perfectly enlightened, you are not fully enlightened about these things.’ Since I do not see any such ground, I dwell secure, fearless, and self-confident.

(2) “I do not see any ground on the basis of which an ascetic or brahmin or deva or Māra or Brahmā or anyone in the world might reasonably reprove me, saying: ‘Though you claim to be one whose taints are destroyed, you have not fully destroyed these taints.’ Since I do not see any such ground, I dwell secure, fearless, and self-confident.

(3) “I do not see any ground on the basis of which an ascetic or brahmin or deva or Māra or Brahmā or anyone in the world might reasonably reprove me, saying: ‘These things that you have said to be obstructive are not able to obstruct one who engages in them.’ Since I do not see any such ground, I dwell secure, fearless, and self-confident.

(4) “I do not see any ground on the basis of which an ascetic or brahmin or deva or Māra or Brahmā or anyone in the world might reasonably reprove me, saying: ‘The Dhamma does not lead one who practices it to the complete destruction of suffering, the goal for the sake of which you teach it.’ [634] Since I do not see any such ground, I dwell secure, fearless, and self-confident.

“These, bhikkhus, are the four kinds of self-confidence that the Tathāgata has, possessing which he claims the place of the chief bull, roars his lion’s roar in the assemblies, and sets in motion the wheel of Brahmā.”

    These pathways of doctrine,
    formulated in diverse ways,
    relied upon by ascetics and brahmins,
    do not reach the Tathāgata,
    the self-confident one who has passed
    beyond the pathways of doctrine. [635]

    Consummate, having overcome everything,
    he set in motion the wheel of Dhamma
    out of compassion for all beings.
    Beings pay homage to such a one,
    the best among devas and humans,
    who has gone beyond existence.

Notes

[633] Mp glosses brahma here as “best, supreme, pure” (seṭṭhaṃ uttamaṃ visuddhaṃ) and identifies brahmacakka with dhammacakka, the wheel of the Dhamma.

[634] Yassa kho pana te atthāya dhammo desito so na niyyāti takkarassa sammā dukkhakkhayāyā ti. Mp takes yassa atthāya to mean “the purpose for which” the Dhamma is taught, identified as the destruction of lust, etc., and “the Dhamma” to be meditation on unattractiveness, etc. The verb niyyāti means “goes out” (to the complete destruction of suffering). Takkarassa is likely to be a sandhi formation: takkaro assa.

I have been able to track down two Chinese versions of the phrase (there may be more): (1) EĀ 27.6 (T II 645c10–11) reads (“It is impossible that this outward-going Dharma of the noble ones does not go out to the complete end of suffering”). (2) EĀ 46.4 (T II 776c28– 777a2) has (“By this Dharma taught by me the noble ones go out correctly to the complete end of suffering. It is impossible that any ascetic (etc.) could come and say: ‘[They] have not reached the complete end of suffering’”).

[635] Vanarata writes with regard to pāda c: “I think that patvā is a mistaken adaptation from an original early Pāli pattā, which can be both absolutive and past participle. When Pāli was reshaped, the wrong alternative was chosen. Pattā, being past participle, should have been left unchanged” (personal communication). I read pāda d with Be visāradaṃ vādapathātivattaṃ, a reading shared with older Sinhala manuscripts. Ce has visāradaṃ vādapathātivattīnaṃ, which is also plausible, but Ee visāradaṃ vādapathāti vuttaṃ is certainly mistaken.
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