Vinaya Pitaka

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.

Re: Vinaya Pitaka

Postby Paññāsikhara » Fri Jan 08, 2010 7:37 am

suanck wrote:
Bankei wrote:
Bhikkhuni Dhammananda (Chatsumarn Kabilsingh), wrote her Ph.D. thesis on a comparison of the six different vinayas and wrote a book including a translating them all, see:
The Bhikkhuni Patimokkha of the Six Schools
By Chatsumarn Kabilsingh Ph.D.
A translation the monastic rules of Buddhist nuns or the Patimokkha of the Six Schools.
http://www.buddhist-elibrary.org/librar ... adpath=112 (free download)


It should be noted that in the Introduction, Ven Dhammananda wrote that the 5 Chinese Vinayas were translated from Chinese to Thai by a Chinese-Thai scholar. Subsequently, she used the Thai translation for her research and later translated from Thai to English.

Suan.


Methodological crisis. From Indic to Chinese, from Chinese to Thai, and from Thai to English. Each step of the way is into a radically different language system. That's not good, one should really use the source languages for such a study. Who was the "Chinese-Thai" scholar?
My recently moved Blog, containing some of my writings on the Buddha Dhamma, as well as a number of translations from classical Buddhist texts and modern authors, liturgy, etc.: Huifeng's Prajnacara Blog.
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Re: Vinaya Pitaka

Postby suanck » Fri Jan 08, 2010 7:45 am

Paññāsikhara wrote:
Methodological crisis. From Indic to Chinese, from Chinese to Thai, and from Thai to English. Each step of the way is into a radically different language system. That's not good, one should really use the source languages for such a study. Who was the "Chinese-Thai" scholar?


Taken from her book:

Acknowledgement

I wish to express deep appreciation to Mr. Liang Sathiensut,
my teacher, who has kindly given an unfailing assistance in
providing and making possible the Thai manuscript of the
Bhikkhuni Patimokkha of the six schools from the Chinese
Version of the Tripitaka.


and from the Introduction:

As my Chinese is only fundamental, I had to search for
help which was not easy. But finally I took help from Mr.
Liang Sathiensut, a graduate from mainland China and a
very good Buddhist scholar. When I worked with him in
1971 he was already in his late sixties with a troubled eyesight.
He had to take the help of both reading glasses and
magnifying glass. So the translation went on slowly with his
reading of each sentence, translated it and I noted down
word by word. There were some obscured passages where
we would check the meanings in Vibhanga for correct
translations.

Our first manuscript in Thai language was completed
after some months of hard work, especially on the part of Mr.
Liang Sathiensut. As the Thais are neither concerned nor
ready for the knowledge about bhikkhunis, the manuscript
was utilised only as primary texts for my dissertation and was
never published in the Thai language.


Suan.
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