Celtic Buddhism?

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.

Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Kusala » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:47 am

Hello Dhamma friends. Check out this interesting article. http://seanrobsville.blogspot.com/2009/ ... n-pre.html
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Homage to the Buddha
Thus indeed, is that Blessed One: He is the Holy One, fully enlightened, endowed with clear vision and virtuous conduct, sublime, the Knower of the worlds, the incomparable leader of men to be tamed, the teacher of gods and men, enlightened and blessed.

Homage to the Teachings
The Dhamma of the Blessed One is perfectly expounded; to be seen here and now; not delayed in
time; inviting one to come and see; onward leading (to Nibbana); to be known by the wise, each for himself.
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Re: Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Kim OHara » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:18 am

The cross-legged figure has been attributed to the Vikings and used as evidence for Viking Buddhism in a thread here ... maybe a year ago.
The rest? Coincidence, wishful thinking and natural similarities account for 99.9% of it, IMO. Sure, some very slight possibility that there was cultural contact between India and Ireland 2,000 years ago even if it did happen it can now never be proven, much less become useful to us.

:namaste:
Kim
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Re: Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Reductor » Fri Jun 10, 2011 3:32 am

Even freakier is a suggestion in "Twenty cases suggestive of reincarnation" that buddhist monks found their way to mexico and alaska.

For example, stevenson quoted findings that funeral hymes among the tlingit aboriginals contain chinese words. Also prominent is that the tlingit concept of 'reincarnation' resembles more buddhist 'rebirth', even in thr analogy of candle igniting candle (possibly the most common analogy).

Add an accounting from a buddhist monk of a sea journey where he traveled from island to island until reaching a very large country. These islands, and the description of the journey, resembles a possible route of immigration for peoples along an island chain that stretches across the pacific ocean.

I have since returned the book to the library. Probably I should have noted Stevensons references; although I haven't any means of aquiring the articles anyway. Tsk.

Fun to contemplate, yes.
Michael

The thoughts I've expressed in the above post are carefully considered and offered in good faith.

And friendliness towards the world is happiness for him who is forbearing with living beings. -- Ud. 2:1
To his own ruin the fool gains knowledge, for it cleaves his head and destroys his innate goodness. -- Dhp 72

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Re: Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Kusala » Sat Jun 18, 2011 12:02 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:The cross-legged figure has been attributed to the Vikings and used as evidence for Viking Buddhism in a thread here ... maybe a year ago.
The rest? Coincidence, wishful thinking and natural similarities account for 99.9% of it, IMO. Sure, some very slight possibility that there was cultural contact between India and Ireland 2,000 years ago even if it did happen it can now never be proven, much less become useful to us.

:namaste:
Kim


Hi Kim. You may or may not find this interesting...all is needed is approximately 4 minutes... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0HCs6PV ... ideo_title
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Homage to the Buddha
Thus indeed, is that Blessed One: He is the Holy One, fully enlightened, endowed with clear vision and virtuous conduct, sublime, the Knower of the worlds, the incomparable leader of men to be tamed, the teacher of gods and men, enlightened and blessed.

Homage to the Teachings
The Dhamma of the Blessed One is perfectly expounded; to be seen here and now; not delayed in
time; inviting one to come and see; onward leading (to Nibbana); to be known by the wise, each for himself.
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Re: Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Kim OHara » Sat Jun 18, 2011 12:03 pm

Kusala wrote:Hi Kim. You may or may not find this interesting...all is needed is approximately 4 minutes... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0HCs6PV ... ideo_title

That's a 49 minute lecture, not 4. And from the 4 that I watched, I learned nothing new. Prehistoric migrations? Sure. Indo-European language family? Sure. Probable cultural contact in mediaeval times? Different thing entirely.
:coffee:
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Re: Celtic Buddhism?

Postby Nori » Wed Sep 07, 2011 3:57 am

This is a very interesting article. Thanks.

It is interesting to think that Buddhist 'missions' traveled to very far off places in the times immediately following the Buddhas death. Their intentions (to spread the dhamma), I think, was stated somewhere in the Tipitaka.

I noticed that in the Nag Hammadi library, many of the sayings of the 'Savior', in the Gospel of Thomas spoke about things very similar to the Buddha's teachings. I often wonder whether that is because they discovered the same truths or whether the 'Savior' was influenced by the Buddha.
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