Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby rowyourboat » Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:07 pm

Thank you for the replies to me questions- especially the quotes by Bikkhu Gavesako helped a lot- this is valuable to me- I did wonder if what is openly taught is what is deemed appropriate for his general audience - my question was not meant to cause any offence :anjali:
with metta
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby Guy » Fri May 22, 2009 7:26 pm

gavesako wrote:Dhamma teachings of Ajahn Sumedho
The five khandhas are all about death.



Mindfulness is the way out of insanity.
(Amaravati winter retreat 1999)


If consciousness is one of the five khandhas and is therefore all about death, what is the difference between consciousness and mindfulness? Isn't mindfulness only possible because of consciousness? I know that consciousness doesn't require mindfulness, but mindfulness always requires consciousness, right? or not?

When I hear things like "trust in awareness" I am not sure I understand what that is pointing to exactly.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jun 02, 2009 1:59 am

Greetings Guy,

Guy wrote:If consciousness is one of the five khandhas and is therefore all about death, what is the difference between consciousness and mindfulness?


The khandas are death, because they are conditioned, thus are impermanent, not-self and dukkha. Mindfulness is conditioned too. However, mindfulness is a tool that can help lead to the unconditioned, which is not all about death. Hence perhaps the analogy of the Dhamma as a raft.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby Guy » Tue Jun 02, 2009 2:42 am

Ah, thanks Retro, that clears things up a bit for me.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby jcsuperstar » Tue Jun 02, 2009 3:54 am

while the scholar monk vs meditation monk quote is cool and all, when dealing with matters of meditation i would trust the meditation monk over the scholar monk just as i would trust a surgeon over medical text book editor to perform my surgery
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby cooran » Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:28 am

Hello jcsuperstar,

And how do you think the surgeon graduated, became qualified and was employed in a hospital to practice and instruct others, without rigorous study on which to base his practical skills?

Similarly with Bhikkhus.

metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby adosa » Tue Jun 02, 2009 10:11 am

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings Guy,

Guy wrote:If consciousness is one of the five khandhas and is therefore all about death, what is the difference between consciousness and mindfulness?


The khandas are death, because they are conditioned, thus are impermanent, not-self and dukkha. Mindfulness is conditioned too. However, mindfulness is a tool that can help lead to the unconditioned, which is not all about death. Hence perhaps the analogy of the Dhamma as a raft.

Metta,
Retro. :)


Hi Retro

Plus, clinging to the khandas is death as doing so leads to re-birth, aging, sickness, and death.

Ron
"To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas" - Dhammapada 183
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Re: Ajahn Sumedho on Meditation

Postby jcsuperstar » Tue Jun 02, 2009 10:04 pm

Chris wrote:Hello jcsuperstar,

And how do you think the surgeon graduated, became qualified and was employed in a hospital to practice and instruct others, without rigorous study on which to base his practical skills?

Similarly with Bhikkhus.

metta
Chris

we dont need no book learnin!! :guns:

in my case i learned under a monk, i didnt really start reading about it till way after. and i suspect this is the case with most of those rag robed monks, you sit and you practice and your teacher either says youre on the right track or youre an idiot. and when the suttas were purely oral this was probably more so then now
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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