A different sort of meditation

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Re: A different sort of meditation

Postby Goofaholix » Wed Feb 08, 2012 6:13 am

Well that touched a raw nerve.

JWR wrote:Have you ever actually spent quality time in Bangkok?


Actually I spent six months there teaching english, in addition to the two years or so in other parts of Thailand, including 3 months as a monk, and marrying a Thai.

So I know a little bit about Thailand. I realise Muay Thai is the national sport but you'd hardly think so, there seems to be little interest in the national sport that I ever noticed (other than occasionally hearing it on the radio in taxis), not like national sports are in some countries (having just endured months on end of the much hyped Rugby World cup).

This is all of course besides the point, I don't see any relevance of Muay Thai to Theravada Buddhism, at least no more than Rugby has to Catholicism.
"Whenever we feel that we are definitely right, so much so that we refuse to open up to anything or anybody else, right there we are wrong. It becomes wrong view. When suffering arises, where does it arise from? The cause is wrong view, the fruit of that being suffering. If it was right view it wouldn't cause suffering." - Ajahn Chah
"Remember you dont meditate to get anything, but to get rid of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go. If you want anything, you wont find it." - Ajahn Chah
User avatar
Goofaholix
 
Posts: 1711
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:49 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: A different sort of meditation

Postby JWR » Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:45 am

Goofaholix wrote:Well that touched a raw nerve.

JWR wrote:Have you ever actually spent quality time in Bangkok?


Actually I spent six months there teaching english, in addition to the two years or so in other parts of Thailand, including 3 months as a monk, and marrying a Thai.

So I know a little bit about Thailand. I realise Muay Thai is the national sport but you'd hardly think so, there seems to be little interest in the national sport that I ever noticed (other than occasionally hearing it on the radio in taxis), not like national sports are in some countries (having just endured months on end of the much hyped Rugby World cup).

This is all of course besides the point, I don't see any relevance of Muay Thai to Theravada Buddhism, at least no more than Rugby has to Catholicism.


This being the case with your life, I obviously 'read' you all wrong. You never know who you're really talking to on a web-based forum. I surely didn't know.

We all have different backgrounds, different stories. My main interest in Theravada came through the people I met via Muay Thai. Yours obviously wasn't. No worries.

As for you being a monk three months: the temporary monk option is something really good about Thai Theravada, which (unless I'm mistaken) doesn't exist in other places, like Sri Lanka. What I'm not sure about is my situation. I'm married with kids, totally immersed in samsara. Can a married man take a few weeks or month from his life and be a temporary monk in Thailand? If so, what if I'm not proficient in Pali? Would I be totally lost?

Thanks,
JWR

P.S. Since you know Bangkok, I always stay in Bangkapi district when I'm there, next to the khlong. It's only six or so km from the tourist parts, but seems like a totally different city.
"You're a poor farmer, mind of mine!
You've let the precious field of human life sit fallow too long.
If only you had planted right, a golden crop would be yours by now!"

-Ramprasad Sen
JWR
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 7:43 am

Re: A different sort of meditation

Postby Goofaholix » Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:54 am

JWR wrote:As for you being a monk three months: the temporary monk option is something really good about Thai Theravada, which (unless I'm mistaken) doesn't exist in other places, like Sri Lanka. What I'm not sure about is my situation. I'm married with kids, totally immersed in samsara. Can a married man take a few weeks or month from his life and be a temporary monk in Thailand? If so, what if I'm not proficient in Pali? Would I be totally lost?


No worries, it was my fault for being a bit blunt.

Yes a married man can ordain, Thais do it sometimes, I'm not sure if it's a rule but you'd need to have your wife's blessing and be comfortable that your family will be ok without you for that time.

I'm not a fan of short temporary ordination, I think three months should be the absolute minimum.

You won't need to know any Pali, though you should practise the ordination chanting before you ordain. Speaking enough Thai to get by is important, other than that the main thing is to make sure you find a good monastery that keeps a good standard of vinaya and will be supportive of your meditation practise.
"Whenever we feel that we are definitely right, so much so that we refuse to open up to anything or anybody else, right there we are wrong. It becomes wrong view. When suffering arises, where does it arise from? The cause is wrong view, the fruit of that being suffering. If it was right view it wouldn't cause suffering." - Ajahn Chah
"Remember you dont meditate to get anything, but to get rid of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go. If you want anything, you wont find it." - Ajahn Chah
User avatar
Goofaholix
 
Posts: 1711
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:49 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: A different sort of meditation

Postby JWR » Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:01 am

Goofaholix wrote: No worries, it was my fault for being a bit blunt.

Yes a married man can ordain, Thais do it sometimes, I'm not sure if it's a rule but you'd need to have your wife's blessing and be comfortable that your family will be ok without you for that time.

I'm not a fan of short temporary ordination, I think three months should be the absolute minimum.

You won't need to know any Pali, though you should practise the ordination chanting before you ordain. Speaking enough Thai to get by is important, other than that the main thing is to make sure you find a good monastery that keeps a good standard of vinaya and will be supportive of your meditation practise.


Khaphunkrap!
"You're a poor farmer, mind of mine!
You've let the precious field of human life sit fallow too long.
If only you had planted right, a golden crop would be yours by now!"

-Ramprasad Sen
JWR
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 7:43 am

Previous

Return to Theravada Meditation

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: cooran and 3 guests