Am I thinking or meditating?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Am I thinking or meditating?

Postby SarathW » Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:26 am

Am I thinking or meditating?
When I meditate I keep attention to my body and mind. Then I will see them in terms of 1st ,2nd,4th Noble truths. I think 3rd Noble Truth is a result of other 3 (however I think about the four stage of sainthood as well. (Not as an attachment, for the purpose of understanding)
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Re: Am I thinking or meditating?

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:28 am

Greetings Sarath,

MN 10 wrote:"Furthermore, the monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the four noble truths. And how does he remain focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the four noble truths? There is the case where he discerns, as it has come to be, that 'This is stress.' He discerns, as it has come to be, that 'This is the origination of stress.' He discerns, as it has come to be, that 'This is the cessation of stress.' He discerns, as it has come to be, that 'This is the way leading to the cessation of stress.'

"In this way he remains focused internally on mental qualities in & of themselves, or externally on mental qualities in & of themselves, or both internally & externally on mental qualities in & of themselves. Or he remains focused on the phenomenon of origination with regard to mental qualities, on the phenomenon of passing away with regard to mental qualities, or on the phenomenon of origination & passing away with regard to mental qualities. Or his mindfulness that 'There are mental qualities' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, unsustained by (not clinging to) anything in the world. This is how a monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the four noble truths...

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Am I thinking or meditating?

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:55 am

Hi Sarah,
SarathW wrote:Am I thinking or meditating?
When I meditate I keep attention to my body and mind. Then I will see them in terms of 1st ,2nd,4th Noble truths. I think 3rd Noble Truth is a result of other 3 (however I think about the four stage of sainthood as well. (Not as an attachment, for the purpose of understanding)

The Buddha taught all kinds of different meditations and reflections. Reflection of the qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, Devas, and so on. So your question is rather broad...

The fourth section of the Maha-Satipatthana sutta does contain:
5. The Four Noble Truths

And further, monks, a monk lives contemplating mental objects in the mental objects of the four noble truths.

How, monks, does a monk live contemplating mental objects in the mental objects of the four noble truths?

Herein, monks, a monk knows, "This is suffering," according to reality; he knows, "This is the origin of suffering," according to reality; he knows, "This is the cessation of suffering," according to reality; he knows "This is the road leading to the cessation of suffering," according to reality.

Thus he lives contemplating mental objects in mental objects internally, or he lives contemplating mental objects in mental objects externally, or he lives contemplating mental objects in mental objects internally and externally. He lives contemplating origination-factors in mental objects, or he lives contemplating dissolution-factors in mental objects, or he lives contemplating origination-and-dissolution-factors in mental objects.[27] Or his mindfulness is established with the thought, "Mental objects exist," to the extent necessary just for knowledge and mindfulness, and he lives detached, and clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk lives contemplating mental objects in the mental objects of the four noble truths.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nysa.html

However, it's hard to imagine doing that successfully without some extensive work on developing quite a lot of concentration, and developing mindfulness with respect to the body, feelings, and mind states.

:anjali:
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