Buddho

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:39 pm

An Amazing Hunter Hound Named “Buddho” by Phramick Ratanapanyo Bhikkhu

I once heard a Dhamma talk in Thai, a losely translated and summarised portion of the Tripitaka (Buddhist Canonical) by Venerable Phra Kasem Ajinasilo of Wat Sam Yaak, Thailand. Ven. Phra Ajahn Kasem is one of the disciples of Luongta Maha Bowa and he delivered some of the highest teachings in simplified formats, showing the great capacities of the Forest Theravadan Traditions in South East Asia…

On one cold winters day of 479BC in the town of Vanarasi, India. The lord Buddha sat in a serene lunch setting offered by the generosity of the town’s people. Beside him were Venerable Sariputta and Venerable. Moggalana.

Suddenly, The Lord or sages turned to Ven. Sariputta on his right “Sariputta… Do you recall a deer hunter who lives in the southern end of this forest?”

“Yes I do my Lord” Ven. Sariputta replied. “The one who hates Bhikkhus” (monks).

“He’s in trouble and may need your help.” The Buddha continued… “approximately a quarter yode (4 kilometers) north of his place, you should find him.”

“Yes Lord”. Replied the right hand Bhikkhu of great wisdom. “I shall leave at once”.

————————–
“Milindha! Milindha! Milinnnnndhaaaa!!!!!” Crying and sobbing in tears…
“Where are you my good Milindha?!!! Ho… ho…. Come baaaaaaaack my friend….” The hunter shouted out loud and continuously at his beloved hunter hound named Milindha, all the while his own body laid on the ground, with his stomache ripped open, fatally wounded from bear attack.

“Milindha! Milindha! Milinnn…”

“Who are you calling layman?” Ven. Sariputta approached the dying man…

“Piss off you bald-headed samana from hell! I don’t wanna see your face!” the hunter shouted in hatred as he saw a Buddhist practitioner approaching.

“Layman… it appears that you have been seriously wounded… let me help you”

“Get lost! You disgust me you robed up bald-head! Milindha! Milindha! Milinnn…”

“Layman! Who is Milindha?” Sariputta pushed the dying man.

“My dog! Now go back to where you came from!”

“I see… you lost your dog.” Sariputta said calmly.

“He followed the bear after it hit me… ohhhhh God! My Milindha… I hope he’s not hurt or dead…” the hunter sobs as the speaks of his beloved friend.

“Layman, I can help you… you see I know of three special Dogs. Huge and amazing hunter hounds that can track down anybody you want.”

“Really? Three great hunter hounds? You mean it?”

“Of course… I’m samana… I don’t lie” Sariputta replied.

“Well what’s their name?!!” the hunter barked the question at the monk.

“Buddho.. . the pack leader, then Dhammo the second, this one can take you anywhere just as good as Buddho, and finally the third… Sangho this one can easily take you to heaven.” The monk of great wisdom shortly explained.

“I can’t remember all of them three names!”

“Just call the leader of the pack!”

“Which one?!!!!”

“BUDDHO!” Sariputta shoved it in.

“Aha! BUDDHO! Buddho! Buddddddhhhhooooo!”

Venerable Sariputta watched as the man repeatedly called the name of the great hunter hound named Buddho, his voice reaching the far end of the forest, the calling went on and on until his body malfunctioned beyond repairs… death.
————————–

“BUDDHO! Buddho! Buddddddhhhhooooo!” the mind of the hunter continued on… as he lef his body, similar to a driver getting out of a dead car, still carying the same memory residue of himself… a male hunter… only without the fatal wounding and the new capacity to frequency shift in between different bandwidths of the quantum universe.

“BUDDHO! Buddho!”

The sound was heard by the low heaven frequency…
“BUDDHO! Buddddddhhhhooooo! Hell I’m so tired calling this name… “
Several men of the low heaven frequency surprised after hearing someone calling out this name or using this term…

“Are you lost?” The angels of the Jatumaharachikka – first heaven frequency asked.

“No! Looking for Buddho!!” the hunter shouted.

“Well come this way, let me take you…” said the angels.

“Buddho! Buddho!” looking left and right as he calls the head leader of the hound pack.

“Who is that?!!” asked the angel of the Tavatimsa – 2nd quantum frequency of heaven. “Are you looking for Buddho?”

“Yes! I am!!! I need him to find my…”

“This way please…” the angels guided the man still looking for a lost dog.

“Buddho!”

“Seems somebody looking for a samana named Buddho…” said the angel of the Yama – 3rd quantum frequency of heaven. “This way Mr.”

“Will I ever find this damn dog? Hell! Buddddddhhhhooooo!”

“Up here!” shouted the Tusita angels of th 4th quantum frequency of heaven.

“Oh God I’m so tired… will I ever find… OWWWWWWWWW!!!!!” so busy the hunter was, he did not care to mind his surroundings… until now. “Soooooo many beautiful women here! I can’t believe this place! What do you call it?”

“It’s called Tusita” The well dressed man replied… “Do you like it?”

“Oh yes I do….. think I’ll stay here for a while.”
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:15 pm

"All you have to study is the meditation-word, buddho. As for any other fields you might study, they never come to an end, and can't take you beyond suffering. But once you're come to the end of buddho, that's when you'll come to true happiness."
- Ajahn Fuang Jotiko
Last edited by bodom on Sun Sep 05, 2010 9:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:23 pm

From Ajahn Akincano:

Whatever our activity, be it drinking, thinking or talking, we have mindfulness, that is, clear recollection. Alternatively, we can establish the recitation of a mantra - 'Buddho', 'Dhammo' or 'Sangho' - to govern and guide our mind. Whether standing, walking, seated or reclining, we establish this internal recitation of 'Buddho' to govern the minds tendency towards distraction and diversity as it wanders about in the past and the future, continually proliferating.

Laypeople should firmly establish their lives in virtue and goodness, and try to cultivate mindfulness, samadhi, wisdom and samma-ajiva - ­Right Livelihood. Whatever our work or duties, we should endeavour to perform them with mindfulness using a mantra, Buddho - Dhammo - Sangho, to hold our attention. We have come together to practise Dhamma and so whatever bodily movement or wholesome activity we engage in, we can meditate at the same time by focusing upon the mantra 'Buddho' continuously.
Last edited by bodom on Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:26 pm

Ajahn Akincano:

We must focus on the mantra 'Buddho', establishing continuous awareness, whether standing, walking, sitting, reclining, working, talking, drinking or thinking. Right now, while listening to the Dhamma, we can direct our minds to peace and not allow our attention to wander to other things.

We can recite 'Buddho' continuously whatever our posture or activity, be it eating, coming or going, chanting or meditating. If we can keep this up, then our mindfulness will be firm and focused. Buddho and peace will become firmly and inseparably rooted in the heart.


:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 23, 2010 11:41 pm

When you meditate, don't send your mind outside. Don't fasten onto any knowledge at all. Whatever knowledge you've gained from books or teachers, don't bring it in to complicate things. Cut away all preoccupations, and then as you meditate let all your knowledge come from what's going on in the mind. When the mind is quiet, you'll know it for yourself. But you have to keep meditating a lot. When the time comes for things to develop, they'll develop on their own. Whatever you know, have it come from your own mind."The knowledge that comes from a mind that's quiet is extremely subtle and profound. So let your knowledge come out of a mind quiet and still."Have the mind give rise to a single preoccupation. Don't send it outside. Let the mind stay right in the mind. Let the mind meditate on its own. Let it be the one that keeps repeating buddho, buddho. And then genuine buddho will appear in the mind. You'll know for yourself what buddho is like. That's all there is to it. There's not a whole lot."
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby PeterB » Thu Jun 24, 2010 9:38 am

Thanks for the quotes Bodom.. :anjali:
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:29 am

bodom wrote:
When you meditate, don't send your mind outside. Don't fasten onto any knowledge at all. Whatever knowledge you've gained from books or teachers, don't bring it in to complicate things. Cut away all preoccupations, and then as you meditate let all your knowledge come from what's going on in the mind. When the mind is quiet, you'll know it for yourself. But you have to keep meditating a lot. When the time comes for things to develop, they'll develop on their own. Whatever you know, have it come from your own mind."The knowledge that comes from a mind that's quiet is extremely subtle and profound. So let your knowledge come out of a mind quiet and still."Have the mind give rise to a single preoccupation. Don't send it outside. Let the mind stay right in the mind. Let the mind meditate on its own. Let it be the one that keeps repeating buddho, buddho. And then genuine buddho will appear in the mind. You'll know for yourself what buddho is like. That's all there is to it. There's not a whole lot."

who said this one?
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby acinteyyo » Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:47 am

Ajahn Dune Atulo said it. It's from the book "Gifts He Left Behind" paragraph 17 "What buddho is like"
Pubbe cāhaṃ bhikkhave, etarahi ca dukkhañceva paññāpemi, dukkhassa ca nirodhaṃ. (M.22)
Both formerly, monks, and now, it is just suffering that I make known and the ending of suffering.
Pathabyā ekarajjena, saggassa gamanena vā sabbalokādhipaccena, sotāpattiphalaṃ varaṃ. (Dhp 178)
Sole dominion over the earth, going to heaven or lordship over all worlds: the fruit of stream-entry excels them.

:anjali:
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 12:06 pm

thank you!

and this thread should be in the meditation section dont you think?
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby Ben » Thu Jun 24, 2010 12:32 pm

jcsuperstar wrote:and this thread should be in the meditation section dont you think?

What a great idea!
Done
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:08 pm

If you hold buddho close to the heart, and use your mindfulness to keep the mind with nothing but buddho, no dangers will come your way. So have firm faith in buddho. I guarantee that there will be no dangers at all — unless you've done bad kamma in the past, which is something beyond anyone's power to protect you from. Even the Buddha himself can't protect you from it.


Buddho is something cool and calm. It's the path for giving rise to peace and contentment —


When people begin meditating, their confidence tends to be weak. No matter what their meditation subject, these sorts of defilements are sure to interfere, because these defilements form the basis of the world and of the mind. The minute we meditate and make the mind one-pointed, the defilements see that we're going to get away from them, so they come thronging around so that we won't be able to escape from the world.

ajaan Tate
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:14 pm

We say that in all postures, you should keep the meditation on Buddho in mind. Buddho means that “the one who knows:’ is arising continuously. When objects come, you know them. You can resolve things and can expound the truth. This is the fruit of Buddho. Let there be the one who knows; practice Buddho just for this. This is called hearing Dhamma and realizing fruition, knowing Dhamma and practicing it. You should be practicing and seeing it so you become it in your mind. This is called one who understands and sees. This is the way that the Buddha’s teaching bears fruit.


Ajahn Chah

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:15 pm

ajahn Sumedho
The Mantra 'Buddho'
If you've got a really active thinking mind, you may find the mantra[2] 'Buddho' helpful. Inhale on 'Bud' and exhale on '-dho' so you're actually thinking this for each inhalation. This is a way of sustaining concentration: so for the next fifteen minutes, do the anapanasati, putting all your attention, composing your mind with the mantric sound, 'Bud-dho'. Learn to train the mind to that point of clarity and brightness rather than just sinking into passivity. It requires sustained effort: one inhalation of 'Bud' -- fully bright and clear in your mind, the thought itself raised and bright from the beginning to the end of the inhalation, and '-dho' on the exhalation. Let everything else go at this time. The occasion has arisen now to do just this -- you can solve your problems and the world's problems afterwards. At this time this much is all the occasion calls for. Bring the mantra up into consciousness. Make the mantra fully conscious instead of just a perfunctory passive thing that makes the mind dull; energise the mind so that the inhalation on 'Bud' is a bright inhalation, not just a perfunctory 'Bud' sound that fades out because it never gets brightened or refreshed by your mind. You can visualise the spelling so that you're fully with that syllable for the length of an inhalation, from the beginning to the end. Then '-dho' on the exhalation is performed the same way so that there's a continuity of effort rather than sporadic leaps-and-starts and failures.

Just notice if you have any obsessive thoughts that are coming up -- some silly phrase that might be going through your mind. Now if you just sink into a passive state, then obsessive thoughts will take over. But learning to understand how the mind works and how to use it skilfully, you're taking this particular thought, the concept of 'Buddho' (the Buddha, the One Who Knows), and you're holding it in the mind as a thought. Not just as an obsessive, habitual thought, but as a skilful use of thought, using it to sustain concentration for the length of one inhalation, exhalation, for fifteen minutes.

The practice is that, no matter how many times you fail and your mind starts wandering, you simply note that you're distracted, or that you're thinking about it, or you'd rather not bother with 'Buddho' -- 'I don't want to do that. I'd rather just sit here and relax and not have to put forth any effort. Don't feel like doing it.' Or maybe you've got other things on your mind at this time, creeping in at the edges of consciousness -- so you note that. Note what mood there is in your mind right now -- not to be critical or discouraged, but just calmly, coolly notice, if you're calmed by it, or if you feel dull or sleepy; if you've been thinking all this time or if you've been concentrating. Just to know

The obstacle to concentration practice is aversion to failure and the incredible desire to succeed. Practice is not a matter of will-power, but of wisdom, of noting wisdom. With this practice, you can learn where your weaknesses are, where you tend to get lost. You witness the kind of character traits you've developed in your life so far, not to be critical of them but just to know how to work with them and not be enslaved by them. This means a careful, wise reflection on the way things are. So rather than avoiding them at all costs, even the ugliest messes are observed and recognised. That's an enduring quality. Nibbana[3] is often described as being 'cool'. Sounds like hip talk, doesn't it? But there's a certain significance to that word. Coolness to what? It tends to be refreshing, not caught up in passions but detached, alert and balanced.

The word 'Buddho' is a word that you can develop in your life as something to fill the mind with rather than with worries and all kinds of unskilful habits. Take the word, look at it, listen to it: 'Buddho'! It means the one who knows, the Buddha, the awakened, that which is awake. You can visualise it in your mind. Listen to what your mind says -- blah, blah, blah, etc. It goes on like this, an endless kind of excrement of repressed fears and aversions. So, now, we are recognising that. We're not using 'Buddho' as a club to annihilate or repress things, but as a skilful means. We can use the finest tools for killing and for harming others, can't we? You can take the most beautiful Buddha rupa and bash somebody over the head with it if you want! That's not what we call 'Buddhanussati', Reflection on the Buddha, is it? But we might do that with the word 'Buddho' as a way of suppressing those thoughts or feelings. That's an unskilful use of it. Remember we're not here to annihilate but to allow things to fade out. This is a gentle practice of patiently imposing 'Buddho' over the thinking, not out of exasperation, but in a firm and deliberate way.

The world needs to learn how to do this, doesn't it? -- the U.S. and the Soviet Union -- rather than taking machine guns and nuclear weapons and annihilating things that get in the way; or saying awful nasty things to each other. Even in our lives we do that, don't we? How many of you have said nasty things to someone else recently, wounding things, unkind barbed criticism, just because they annoy you, get in your way, or frighten you? So we practise just this with the little nasty annoying things in our own mind, the things which are foolish and stupid. We use 'Buddho', not as a club but as a skilful means of allowing it to go, to let go of it. Now for the next fifteen minutes, go back to your noses, with the mantra 'Buddho'. See how to use it and work with it.
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:22 pm

if anyone knows how to contact Ajahn Jayasaro he may know where ajahn Chah learned it from as he wrote the (thai) biography on ajahn chah..
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:26 pm

also anyone know any good dhamma talks online to download that deal with this topic?
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:36 pm

jcsuperstar wrote:also anyone know any good dhamma talks online to download that deal with this topic?


Heres one from my favorite Dhamma teacher Ajahn Pasanno:

Buddho
http://www.abhayagiri.org/main/medium/666/

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:47 pm

Just keep breathing in and out like this. Don't be interested in anything else. It doesn't matter even if someone is standing on their head with their ass in the air. Don't pay it any attention. Just stay with the in-breath and the out-breath. Concentrate your awareness on the breath. Just keep doing it. Don't take up anything else. There's no need to think about gaining things. Don't take up anything at all. Simply know the in- breath and the out-breath. The in-breath and the out-breath. Bud on the in-breath; dho on the out-breath. Just stay with the breath in this way until you are aware of the in-breath and aware of the out-breath....aware of the in-breath....aware of the out-breath. Be aware in this way until the mind is peaceful, without irritation, without agitation, merely the breath going out and coming in. Let your mind remain in this state. You don't need a goal yet. It's this state that is the first stage of practice.


Ajahn Chah

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:48 pm

When you're practising walking meditation (cankama), have a walking path, say from one tree to another, about 50 feet in length. Walking cankamais the same as sitting meditation. Focus your awareness: ''Now, I am going to put forth effort. With strong recollection and self-awareness I am going to pacify my mind.'' The object of concentration depends on the person. Find what suits you. Some people spread mettāto all sentient beings and then leading with their right foot, walk at a normal pace, using the mantra 'Buddho' in conjunction with the walking. Continually being aware of that object. If the mind becomes agitated then stop, calm the mind and then resume walking. Constantly self-aware. Aware at the beginning of the path, aware at every stage of the path, the beginning, the middle and the end. Make this knowing continuous.


Ajahn Chah

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby bodom » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:51 pm

Keep doing it, keep doing it. Do it often. After the meal, air your robe on a line, and get straight out onto the walking meditation path. Keep thinking 'Buddho, Buddho'. Think it all the time that you're walking. Concentrate on the word 'Buddho' as you walk. Wear the path down, wear it down until it's a trench and it's halfway up your calves, or up to your knees. Just keep walking.

So, do it. Follow it until you know in pace with the breath, concentrating on the breath using the mantra 'Buddho'. Just that much. Don't let the mind wander off anywhere else. At this time have this knowing. Do this. Study just this much. Just keep doing it, doing it in this way. If you start thinking that nothing is happening, just carry on anyway. Just carry on regardless and you will get to know the breath.


Ajahn Chah

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Buddho

Postby Moggalana » Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:52 pm

Ajahn Chah is cool :thumbsup:
Let it come. Let it be. Let it go.
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